Walden Questions and Answers

Walden

The theme of Walden is that the simple life brings us more fully alive. Thoreau expresses this theme in chapter 2 of the book when he states the following: I went to the woods because I wished to...

Latest answer posted January 30, 2021 11:10 am UTC

5 educator answers

Walden

If you read the paragraph the quote was taken from, it's all there: I went to the woods because I wished to live deliberately, to front only the essential facts of life, and see if I could not...

Latest answer posted October 22, 2009 7:58 am UTC

2 educator answers

Walden

With the advent of Internet resources and e-books, page number references have become less useful. Further, Thoreau's Walden has appeared in countless editions over the decades, and each of these...

Latest answer posted May 4, 2021 3:41 pm UTC

3 educator answers

Walden

Thoreau lived on the shore of Walden Pond because he wanted to try living simply as a sort of experiment. He felt that most people lead very unhappy lives due to societal pressures to do too much...

Latest answer posted April 6, 2021 10:56 am UTC

3 educator answers

Walden

Thanks, mwestwood! That was some excellent detective work!

Latest answer posted January 26, 2012 9:12 am UTC

3 educator answers

Walden

Henry David Thoreau was himself a man who "marched to the beat of a different drummer." For him, and for the other Transcendentalists, individualism was of paramount important. Another...

Latest answer posted May 24, 2010 2:14 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Walden

This key and very famous chapter of Walden could be called Thoreau's manifesto on why he went to live in the woods by Walden Pond. He says that he goes there to find solitude and strip his life...

Latest answer posted December 21, 2020 1:45 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Walden

In Walden, Henry David Thoreau says that he moved to the woods at Walden Pond because he wished to live deliberately, to front only the essential facts of life, and see if [he] could not learn...

Latest answer posted December 20, 2020 3:21 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Walden

This sentence from Walden occurs in the context of criticizing technology for making our lives more complicated. Thoreau says we, as a society, believe we must have more railroad tracks so that we...

Latest answer posted September 5, 2018 1:14 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Walden

Thoreau is a Transcendentalist author. The best way to describe them is to more or less say that they are extreme Romanticism authors. Romanticism is a literary time period and genre that has...

Latest answer posted January 5, 2016 2:35 pm UTC

3 educator answers

Walden

Thoreau's quote is as follows: Simplicity, simplicity, simplicity! I say, let your affairs be as two or three, and not a hundred or a thousand; instead of a million count half a dozen, and keep...

Latest answer posted December 22, 2019 2:30 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Walden

In this quotation, Thoreau suggests that we do not live deliberately; that we allow our true natures to be disrupted and disturbed by minor occurrences. We care too deeply about small things that...

Latest answer posted October 20, 2019 7:09 pm UTC

4 educator answers

Walden

In a famous paragraph in Walden, Henry David Thoreau asserts the following: The mass of men lead lives of quiet desperation. What is called resignation is confirmed desperation. From the desperate...

Latest answer posted December 20, 2020 11:52 am UTC

1 educator answer

Walden

In Walden, Thoreau uses literary elements such as metaphor, simile, comparison, quotation of other texts, personification, and even sometimes satire to show that he grew closer to nature. For...

Latest answer posted January 19, 2020 12:24 pm UTC

3 educator answers

Walden

Thoreau concludes his Conclusion with the belief that the resurrection of humanity will occur. He speaks of the life within us that is like water that is about to rise higher than it ever has...

Latest answer posted December 29, 2016 1:48 am UTC

2 educator answers

Walden

I'm assuming that you don't quite understand the phrases and need some interpretion? If that's the case, I will try to help. "Walden" by Henry David Thoreau is a very thought-provoking account of...

Latest answer posted September 21, 2009 6:19 am UTC

1 educator answer

Walden

Knowing that Thoreau is a Transcendentalist helps a lot in understanding why he chooses to go out into the woods. Nature is supremely important to the Transcendentalists because they believe there...

Latest answer posted May 2, 2017 3:10 am UTC

2 educator answers

Walden

Thoreau was a philosopher, a nature-lover and naturalist, and a writer. These suggest the things that were important to him. One of his best-known quotes is: Rather than love, than money, than...

Latest answer posted December 26, 2015 7:41 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Walden

The other answers rightly quote Thoreau’s own stated reason for leaving the woods: because he had begun to fall into a rut in his forest existence, and he was no longer far from the beaten path but...

Latest answer posted January 27, 2018 2:30 pm UTC

3 educator answers

Walden

In the first chapter of Walden, Thoreau utilizes personification in his comparison of age and youth. He writes, "Age is no better, hardly so well, qualified for an instructor as youth, for it has...

Latest answer posted December 5, 2019 2:09 am UTC

4 educator answers

Walden

Thoreau manages to include several meanings in his brief reference to the Myrmidons, the warlike race who, according to Ovid in the Metamorphoses, were changed from ants to men by Zeus in order to...

Latest answer posted November 18, 2020 1:32 pm UTC

5 educator answers

Walden

Part of the reason why Thoreau is vitally important today is because he represents how the spirit of dissent is something that is an intrinsic component to American History. In a more globalized...

Latest answer posted March 8, 2010 7:15 pm UTC

4 educator answers

Walden

Thoreau's statement that you should "keep your accounts on your thumb-nail" in Chapter 2 of Walden can refer to the idea that one should not owe or be owed much, if any, money. However, this is...

Latest answer posted July 3, 2016 8:54 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Walden

What this quote is saying is that you should embrace your life even if it seems like it isn't such a great life. As he goes on to say, people who are complainers will make even a paradise seem...

Latest answer posted November 2, 2009 8:56 am UTC

2 educator answers

Walden

I think that the modern implications of Thoreau's quote is rooted in the idea that individuals must listen to their own sense of voice. Thoreau is zealous about the idea that individuals break...

Latest answer posted December 25, 2011 8:12 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Walden

Like his good friend and fellow transcendentalist Emerson, Thoreau believed that conformity was most often the path to misery. He argued that nonconformity was the way to find your truest and most...

Latest answer posted March 1, 2019 7:59 am UTC

2 educator answers

Walden

This metaphor means that rather than simply painting a scene, it is far more difficult and rewarding to paint the atmosphere or lens through which we see this picture. This metaphor can be applied...

Latest answer posted October 5, 2016 6:41 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Walden

Thoreau sees an army of red ants battle an army of black ants near the woodpile by his cabin on Walden Pond. He gets involved in the ferocity of their battle, and he compares it to the Battle of...

Latest answer posted January 15, 2021 12:11 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Walden

This is a good question. It comes down to the underlying structure of those chapters as they fit together. Thoreau condenses his two-year experience into just one here, and he uses a standard...

Latest answer posted May 31, 2016 12:00 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Walden

Thoreau believed that lives lived in civilisation resulted in unnecessary complexity. To truly live simply and to live in harmony with our surroundings it is necessary to do what he did, which was...

Latest answer posted August 30, 2011 8:43 pm UTC

4 educator answers

Walden

Likening the red ants and the black ants to "the republicans (colonists) and the imperalists (the British)," Walden compares the battling insects to humans: For numbers and for carnage it was an...

Latest answer posted June 27, 2010 7:11 am UTC

2 educator answers

Walden

Thoreau's attitude towards government is best expressed in his essay "Civil Disobedience." This essay starts with a phrase that is commonly heard today: "That government is best which governs...

Latest answer posted October 21, 2009 1:56 am UTC

2 educator answers

Walden

In Walden, as elsewhere, Thoreau extols the virtues of simple living, drawing on his own experiences to demonstrate to his readers that they, too, can follow his example. His chapter titled...

Latest answer posted June 11, 2021 9:56 am UTC

1 educator answer

Walden

The other answer gives a succinct description of Thoreau's cabin. I have seen its reproduction at Walden Pond, and a main takeaway is how tiny it is. Thoreau, however, talks expansively about the...

Latest answer posted February 14, 2018 12:28 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Walden

This quote is found in paragraph 5 of the “Where I Lived, and What I Lived For” chapter in Walden. It follows Thoreau’s recounting of a time when he considered buying a farm. He did not purchase...

Latest answer posted May 17, 2016 10:16 am UTC

1 educator answer

Walden

In what is probably the most famous passage in the book, Thoreau explains his reason for living by Walden Pond: I went to the woods because I wished to live deliberately, to front only the...

Latest answer posted December 20, 2020 11:25 am UTC

1 educator answer

Walden

Without the symbolism of Walden Pond, it's likely that Thoreau's book would be little more than a collection of essays lacking an overall sense of structure. But because Walden Pond is always...

Latest answer posted July 8, 2021 12:36 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Walden

For Thoreau in Walden, freedom means clearing life of the encumbrances that prevent one from living from one's soul's center. As he puts it: I went to the woods because I wished to live...

Latest answer posted March 16, 2019 10:25 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Walden

At the beginning of the chapter titled, "Economy," Thoreau himself says that one major reason for his writing Walden is because so many people were curious about his life, specifically the two...

Latest answer posted December 15, 2017 12:35 am UTC

2 educator answers

Walden

Thoreau discusses his search for the simple life, one that will allow him freedom for study and contemplation. He knows he needs to earn some amount of money to afford even the stripped-down life...

Latest answer posted February 2, 2018 12:58 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Walden

It's not surprising that Thoreau should use personification given his pantheistic worldview. Like all pantheists, he regards everything in this world—fauna and flora, rocks and trees, man and...

Latest answer posted June 30, 2019 8:53 am UTC

2 educator answers

Walden

According to Thoreau, Our life is frittered away by detail. An honest man has hardly need to count more than his ten fingers, or in extreme cases he may add his ten toes, and lump the rest....

Latest answer posted January 6, 2019 9:16 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Walden

Henry David Thoreau, a student of Ralph Waldo Emerson's, was a transcendentalist, who believed strongly in the power of nature and living simply. He believed that our lives were too complicated,...

Latest answer posted November 4, 2009 12:33 am UTC

1 educator answer

Walden

In Walden, Thoreau defines the necessities of life as follows: By the words, necessary of life, I mean whatever, of all that man obtains by his own exertions, has been from the first, or from long...

Latest answer posted December 20, 2020 12:37 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Walden

All of Walden can be understood as a passionate argument in favor of living a non-conformist, individualist life. This, according to Thoreau, is the only way to live life fully. Thoreau states in...

Latest answer posted October 28, 2018 6:44 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Walden

Getting meaning out of just that quote is possible, but it makes more sense when taken with the full sentence it came from. "I wanted to live deep and suck out all the marrow of life, to live so...

Latest answer posted April 20, 2015 11:12 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Walden

On the face of it, it may seem ridiculous to compare owning a farm with being locked up in prison. But not to a radical individualist like Thoreau. His personal experiences of trying to buy a farm...

Latest answer posted August 30, 2019 7:35 am UTC

3 educator answers

Walden

Thoreau brings up all circumstances of men. He encourages his readers to not necessarily compare their own life conditions to other men, but to value the circumstances they have themselves for the...

Latest answer posted October 13, 2010 9:57 am UTC

1 educator answer

Walden

Thoreau witnesses two sets of ants fighting on top of his woodpile. One set is black and the other is red. Thoreau has no idea why the ants are fighting, but it is clear that the two armies are...

Latest answer posted December 21, 2020 12:37 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Walden

Thoreau states that he left the woods because he had satisfied his mind by what he had always considered an experiment and he wanted to try something else. I left the woods for as good a reason as...

Latest answer posted May 17, 2015 7:19 am UTC

1 educator answer

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