Waiting for Godot Questions and Answers

Waiting for Godot

The significance of the title rests on the situational irony that the wait for Godot is entirely trifling. Yet, the collateral dynamics that result from this abortive task are as illogical as the...

Latest answer posted April 9, 2015, 1:41 am (UTC)

3 educator answers

Waiting for Godot

We never find out much about Godot; precisely who or what he is remains something of a mystery throughout Beckett's landmark absurdist play. What's more, he never makes an appearance on stage,...

Latest answer posted January 5, 2021, 10:46 am (UTC)

4 educator answers

Waiting for Godot

With Beckett, it's best not to get tied down to one particular meaning. At certain points, all that you can do is put forward your own interpretations and hope for the best. Having said that, some...

Latest answer posted December 6, 2017, 12:06 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

Waiting for Godot

Waiting for Godot presents life as absurd, a situation which can clearly be regarded as tragic or comic, or both. Vladimir and Estragon spend both halves of the play waiting for someone who never...

Latest answer posted May 21, 2020, 3:37 am (UTC)

3 educator answers

Waiting for Godot

If I understand you correctly, it appears that you wish for an analysis of the symbolism of the play as a whole and not an exploration of individual symbols as they appear in the play. A symbol, by...

Latest answer posted July 22, 2015, 8:58 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

Waiting for Godot

Waiting for Godot examines the problem of existentialism in some detail, without ever suggesting a solution. Although "existentialist" is a label applied to a wide range of thinkers, some of whom,...

Latest answer posted May 25, 2020, 11:09 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

Waiting for Godot

If we understand this play to be about existential despair, then this repeated line makes perfect sense as an illustration of the play's theme. Existentialism arose most vigorously after World War...

Latest answer posted June 24, 2017, 12:28 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Waiting for Godot

The relationship between Pozzo and Lucky in act 1 appears to be along the lines of slave and slave master. Pozzo treats Lucky like he is subhuman, keeping Lucky on a rope as if he is an animal. At...

Latest answer posted February 7, 2021, 4:13 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Waiting for Godot

The character of Vladimir is basically the main character, and the one who basically moves the plot forward, in Samuel Beckett's play Waiting for Godot. Vladimir is the strongest man inthe...

Latest answer posted September 6, 2011, 2:24 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Waiting for Godot

In this speech, Pozzo is expressing his frustration about the concept of time and the passage of time. When Pozzo first appears in the play he is able to see and has a servant named Lucky who he...

Latest answer posted April 14, 2011, 1:51 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Waiting for Godot

Estragon and Vladimir, or Gogo and Didi, are the two protagonists of this play. They live out their life waiting for man named Godot, believing that Godot will come to them. A boy comes at the...

Latest answer posted November 22, 2007, 11:30 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Waiting for Godot

In Beckett’s overall exploration of the meaning of existence, the Boy in Waiting for Godot and in Endgame are the same character type, and apparently each perform the same function: by entering the...

Latest answer posted March 18, 2019, 6:22 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

Waiting for Godot

There are three aspects to the existential Angst: anguish, forlornness, and despair. Beckett, trying to “eff the ineffable,” has found a way to “imitate the action” of our own forlornness (the...

Latest answer posted November 10, 2012, 4:47 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Waiting for Godot

As there are only four characters of any importance in Waiting for Godot, and as they appear before the audience in two pairs, it seems natural to compare the two relationships. To do so, however,...

Latest answer posted June 10, 2020, 3:47 am (UTC)

5 educator answers

Waiting for Godot

Lucky is a secondary character in Samuel Beckett's play Waiting for Godot. Lucky only speaks once. He begins his speech speaking about "the existence as uttered forth in the public works of Puncher...

Latest answer posted July 16, 2018, 7:33 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Waiting for Godot

Because Beckett was more interested in the stage as a presentation of a philosophical position rather than as “literature,” his techniques are more theatrical than literary—that is, he uses stage...

Latest answer posted January 5, 2013, 11:44 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Waiting for Godot

In Waiting for Godot, Lucky seems to be anything but lucky; he is a slave to the pompous Pozzo. Lucky must carry Pozzo's belongings, dance, and even think/recite on command. Otherwise, he seems...

Latest answer posted February 9, 2021, 12:51 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Waiting for Godot

Vladimir asks Estragon what they should do while waiting for Godot, who never arrives, leaving them in a state of stasis. Estragon responds by saying, "What about hanging ourselves." Vladimir says,...

Latest answer posted February 8, 2021, 12:24 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Waiting for Godot

In Samuel Beckett's play Waiting for Godot, the quote "There’s man all over for you, blaming on his boots the faults of his feet" means that man, or people, will blame outside factors rather than...

Latest answer posted February 1, 2020, 8:09 pm (UTC)

4 educator answers

Waiting for Godot

The play, Waiting for Godot, is at its heart, a play about what defines life and death. What does it mean to be alive? Existentially alive? Vladimir's quote is in reference to something that...

Latest answer posted April 14, 2011, 3:00 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Waiting for Godot

On the first day in Waiting for Godot, a boy who works for Godot tells Pozzo and Lucky that Godot won't be coming that day. We see the exchange in act 1. When the boy first approaches, he appears...

Latest answer posted February 8, 2021, 12:35 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Waiting for Godot

The posts above nicely sum up the variety of views that this play offers. We can say that the characters are waiting because, in a way, that is all there is to do. They are waiting for something...

Latest answer posted April 9, 2012, 10:26 pm (UTC)

3 educator answers

Waiting for Godot

Estragon (also found under the nickname GOGO), is one of the main characters of Samuel Beckett's absurd play Waiting for Godot. The most salient characteristics of Estragon in the play come from...

Latest answer posted September 6, 2011, 2:03 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Waiting for Godot

In notes that Beckett provided to producer, writer, and critic Michel Polac that were read during a 1952 radio presentation of his absurdist play Waiting for Godot, Samuel Beckett wrote, "I know no...

Latest answer posted May 3, 2021, 5:44 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

Waiting for Godot

Lucky's monologue appears to be on the subject of theology. He speaks of "a personal God . . . with white beard" and he speaks too of heaven and hell. However, whatever theological arguments he...

Latest answer posted June 8, 2019, 12:52 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

Waiting for Godot

The two tramps in Samuel Beckett's play, Waiting for Godot, are Estragon and Vladimir. They seem to represent "human potential." The men have obviously known each other for a number of years. They...

Latest answer posted August 31, 2011, 10:33 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Waiting for Godot

One interpretation of the character of Pozzo in Samuel Beckett’s Waiting for Godot views him as a symbol of the wretched excesses of capitalism. When the arrogant desire for money and power go...

Latest answer posted February 7, 2021, 8:27 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Waiting for Godot

The symbolism behind the lone tree in the landscape in Samuel Beckett's Waiting for Godot has been the subject of a great deal of speculation and analysis. The tree is described as bare when the...

Latest answer posted March 5, 2020, 1:23 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Waiting for Godot

This is probably the most essential question that drives the inquiry behind Beckett's work. On one level, I think that it is a misread to consider "Godot" as "God." It seems that it is to quick...

Latest answer posted February 5, 2010, 9:16 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

Waiting for Godot

I think that if we are examining "comic" in the way of bringing harmony and unity to a particular narrative, there will not be much to find. Perhaps, the only real "comedic" or "comic" end to the...

Latest answer posted June 9, 2011, 7:38 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Waiting for Godot

What makes this play a classic example of the Theatre of the Absurd is the way in which the play consists of nothing more than Estragon and Vladimir waiting for Godot to arrive. The term, Theatre...

Latest answer posted November 10, 2012, 6:40 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Waiting for Godot

It’s interesting to mention that the characters in Becket’s plays usually come in pairs. In Waiting for Godot, those pairs are Vladimir and Estragon, and Pozzo and Lucky. Didi and Gogo (Vladimir...

Latest answer posted November 21, 2018, 8:07 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

Waiting for Godot

Waiting for Godot is sometimes called "the play in which nothing happens twice." The fact that this is not quite true may be taken as a demonstration that there is no such thing as nothing or,...

Latest answer posted December 28, 2019, 7:06 pm (UTC)

5 educator answers

Waiting for Godot

Vladmir's little ditty about a dog that came into the kitchen and stole a crust of bread is a song that never ends. Repetitious, banal, and fundamentally absurd, the song fits in nicely with the...

Latest answer posted September 12, 2019, 10:25 am (UTC)

4 educator answers

Waiting for Godot

The passage of time is one of the central themes of Samuel Beckett's Waiting for Godot, which is understandable given that the characters spend the majority of the play doing just what the title...

Latest answer posted April 10, 2018, 5:40 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

Waiting for Godot

Vladimir and Estragon are waiting for Godot: some indication that life is meaningful or an escape. The name Vladimir can mean prince, man of the people or ruler of peace. Estragon has the...

Latest answer posted January 18, 2011, 4:26 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Waiting for Godot

In Waiting for Godot, the theme of "illusion versus reality" figures prominently. In one sense, the line between illusion and reality/truth is completely blurred. In a seemingly chaotic, illogical...

Latest answer posted January 2, 2013, 11:43 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Waiting for Godot

The elements of the absurd in Beckett's play revolve around the meaningless nature and lack of totality present. There is little in way of traditional character development or maturation in the...

Latest answer posted March 31, 2010, 9:01 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Waiting for Godot

Many readers believe that, in Waiting for Godot, Samuel Beckett promotes the idea that all life is meaningless and there is no point to existence. While there is certainly an absurd despair present...

Latest answer posted March 23, 2016, 10:32 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Waiting for Godot

Samuel Beckett’s tragicomedy Waiting for Godot is a drama of the absurd in which two tramps are wasting time while awaiting the arrival of a man named Godot. In this work, the traditional concept...

Latest answer posted February 28, 2020, 5:28 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Waiting for Godot

The play Waiting for Godotby Samuel Beckett treats the topic of loneliness from the perspective of social, mental, and spiritual isolation instead of treating it as a state of physical separation....

Latest answer posted September 12, 2011, 4:08 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Waiting for Godot

The two main characteristics of this excellent play that you need to know about are its black humour and the way it is an example of the Theatre of the Absurd. This latter term relates to the...

Latest answer posted September 1, 2011, 8:18 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Waiting for Godot

In Waiting for Godot, Lucky the slave is forced to give a speech after his feeble dancing fails to impress Estragon and Vladimir. As he begins his speech, he starts talking of a personal God...

Latest answer posted February 8, 2021, 12:46 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Waiting for Godot

When Pozzo first enters Samuel Beckett’s absurdist drama Waiting for Godot, at about fifteen minutes into the play, the characters Estragon (called “Gogo”) and Vladimir (called “Didi”) are waiting...

Latest answer posted April 27, 2021, 4:57 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Waiting for Godot

A distinction should be made: it is not an absurd play, but an absurdist play (and even that can be argued. Beckett's view of the universe is not absurd, but goalless. He dramatizes the...

Latest answer posted February 17, 2012, 1:35 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

Waiting for Godot

Not only is Waiting for Godot an absurdist drama, it is quite absurd in and of itself. The play has little in the way of plot, with extremely vague and confusing dialogue that is quite nonsensical...

Latest answer posted August 13, 2019, 12:38 am (UTC)

3 educator answers

Waiting for Godot

It is true that Waiting for Godot offers very few plot points and no comfortable resolution of the action. The two main characters, Vladimir and Estragon, spend the entire play waiting for the...

Latest answer posted May 27, 2018, 11:40 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

Waiting for Godot

When looking at the person that Samuel Beckett was, it is clear that he held some rather misogynistic beliefs. How these particularly influenced him in his plays is subject to interpretation. At...

Latest answer posted February 27, 2019, 6:32 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

Waiting for Godot

In Waiting for Godot, Vladimir and Estragon wait because they think there is some purpose to waiting. They think that Godot will bring them some good news, some important bit of information,...

Latest answer posted July 28, 2012, 10:57 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Waiting for Godot

Over the years, Waiting for Godot has been subject to a variety of allegorical readings. The most common tend to be philosophical or religious in nature, due to the story's themes regarding the...

Latest answer posted February 8, 2021, 11:59 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

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