Vanity Fair Questions and Answers

Vanity Fair

The plot of Vanity Fair primarily follows the lives of two women: Becky Sharp, a girl who is born poor and strives to gain money through cunning and social standing through marriage; and Amelia...

Latest answer posted May 23, 2016 3:50 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Vanity Fair

The main part of the title, Vanity Fair, refers to a town encountered in Bunyan's Pilgrim's Progress which is devoted to self-indulgence and sensual pleasure. The sense of vanity echoes the words...

Latest answer posted July 19, 2017 10:54 am UTC

2 educator answers

Vanity Fair

In John Bunyan's seventeenth-century allegory The Pilgrim's Progress, Satan builds a town called Vanity and founds a fair there where everything can be bought or sold for money, including "lust,...

Latest answer posted June 18, 2020 9:45 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Vanity Fair

The term "Vanity Fair" is most often associated in literary discussions with the novel Vanity Fair: A Novel Without a Hero by William Makepeace Thackeray, first published in 1847-8. It details the...

Latest answer posted April 10, 2015 8:30 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Vanity Fair

The narrator in Thackeray's Vanity Fair is a very interesting one. Unnamed and excluded from the story at hand, the narrator takes it upon themselves to critique and comment upon the unfolding...

Latest answer posted May 28, 2019 6:37 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Vanity Fair

Vanity Fair, written by William Makepeace Thackeray and published as a serial between 1847 and 1848, largely follows two female characters: Becky Sharpe, a poor orphan who seeks to obtain wealth...

Latest answer posted February 28, 2018 7:04 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Vanity Fair

While certainly Thackeray had moral and aesthetic reasons for writing the novel, he also had financial ones. He wrote it as a serial (installments in magazines) to make money. Although born into...

Latest answer posted October 25, 2007 7:16 am UTC

2 educator answers

Vanity Fair

The term values can be defined as any "accepted standards of right or wrong" (University of Cincinnati, UC Magazine, "What are Values?"). Values constantly change as societies and cultures change,...

Latest answer posted October 20, 2015 8:53 am UTC

1 educator answer

Vanity Fair

Vanity Fair, in Pilgrim's Progress, is a fair where "all that is there sold, or that comes thither is vanity." (The work is a Christian allegory. We follow the main character, Christian, through a...

Latest answer posted January 21, 2010 10:53 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Vanity Fair

To pinpoint how William Makepeace Thackeray presents Becky’s relationship with Rawdy (or little Rawdon), review the parts that pertain to their bond. Think about how Rebecca is depicted as a mother...

Latest answer posted May 5, 2021 3:35 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Vanity Fair

Nobody mentions this because Becky is no different than Osborne, and she had not cultivated any form of social acceptance that would put her in a position of "damsel in distress". Instead, Becky...

Latest answer posted May 19, 2010 1:39 am UTC

1 educator answer

Vanity Fair

"Futility" is, as per American Heritage Dictionary, The quality of having no useful result; uselessness. Lack of importance or purpose; frivolousness. Nothing I see in the quote above reflects on...

Latest answer posted October 27, 2011 2:28 am UTC

4 educator answers

Vanity Fair

I don't necessarily think that a cigar is just a cigar. One of the joys of literature is the way that we can read in to such tiny details, and Thackeray is of course a master novelist and such...

Latest answer posted November 3, 2011 2:24 am UTC

1 educator answer

Vanity Fair

In this scene, "the old gentleman" is Mr. Osborne, George's father. They are at supper and George is trying to placate him so as to be able to successfully ask for money. The old gentleman is...

Latest answer posted October 28, 2011 8:01 am UTC

5 educator answers