The Triumph of Life Questions and Answers

The Triumph of Life

Pessimism This, admittedly, is a paradox within Shelley's oeuvre, at least when looked at in the context of his most famous pieces such as "Ode to the West Wind," which seem buoyant and uplifting....

Latest answer posted August 3, 2019, 5:36 am (UTC)

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The Triumph of Life

The key to understanding the passage in lines 126 through 134 of Shelley's "The Triumph of Life" lies in the lines that surround the passage and give both background and explanation to the...

Latest answer posted October 4, 2011, 9:21 am (UTC)

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The Triumph of Life

In "The Triumph of Life," Shelley shows us how, throughout history, the human spirit has often been crushed by life itself. In ancient Rome, triumphs were large, lavish processions staged to...

Latest answer posted September 6, 2018, 6:29 am (UTC)

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The Triumph of Life

In Percy Bysshe Shelley's "The Triumph of Life," there are several similes used. Around line 290, Shelley writes about the Church rising "like shadows" between man and God. I take this to mean that...

Latest answer posted January 25, 2011, 2:06 am (UTC)

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The Triumph of Life

The Speaker The speaker appears to be a version of Shelley himself. As in other poems (such as "The Mask of Anarchy," for example), Shelley recounts a dreamlike vision in which a metaphorical...

Latest answer posted August 7, 2019, 4:29 am (UTC)

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The Triumph of Life

Percy Bysshe Shelley's poem "The Triumph of Life" is triumphant, at the very least in the scope of its ambition; in this poem, Shelley attempts to match and surpass the Bible, Dante's Divine...

Latest answer posted August 1, 2019, 2:29 pm (UTC)

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The Triumph of Life

The general tone of "The Triumph of Life" is despairing, if not completely despondent. Shelley presents us with a view of human history in which a succession of noble spirits has been crushed...

Latest answer posted August 1, 2018, 8:32 am (UTC)

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The Triumph of Life

Lines 469-80 of Percy Bysshe Shelley’s poem “The Triumph of Life” are particularly important, because these lines allude to the great Italian poet Dante. Dante, many centuries earlier, had written...

Latest answer posted November 6, 2011, 12:37 pm (UTC)

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The Triumph of Life

[eNotes editors are only permitted to answer one question per posting. Additional questions should be posted separately.] P.B. Shelley's "Triumph of Life," speaks a great deal about Rousseau, the...

Latest answer posted January 26, 2011, 2:56 pm (UTC)

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The Triumph of Life

In the first part of the poem, the speaker describes the morning, how the sun rises and drives the darkness away from the earth. He describes the mountains as flaming crimson altars that reflect...

Latest answer posted August 1, 2019, 3:28 pm (UTC)

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The Triumph of Life

[Poetry is, like all art, something that takes on new life in the face of each person who interacts with it, based on each individual's life experiences. There are many ways to interpret art,...

Latest answer posted January 25, 2011, 11:40 am (UTC)

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The Triumph of Life

In Percy Bysshe Shelley’s poem “The Triumph of Life,” a youth observes a ghostly procession of various specimens of humanity. He asks the spirit of Jean Jacques Rousseau to explain the procession...

Latest answer posted October 15, 2011, 9:41 am (UTC)

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The Triumph of Life

In Percy Bysshe Shelley's poem "The Triumph of Life," a group of people is referred to in lines 135-148. Outside of referring to "Athens or Jerusalem," Shelley never does distinctly define who he...

Latest answer posted October 10, 2011, 1:13 am (UTC)

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The Triumph of Life

This format does not accommodate a prose paraphrase of the entire selection from line 210 to 309, but I can render a portion of the selection into a prose paraphrase upon which you might draw to...

Latest answer posted October 4, 2011, 10:57 am (UTC)

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The Triumph of Life

This is the section of the poem to which you are referring: ..the fiery band which heldTheir natures, snaps--while the shock still may tingleOne falls and then another in the pathSenseless--nor is...

Latest answer posted January 19, 2011, 11:05 pm (UTC)

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The Triumph of Life

The simple explanation is that "little profit brings / Speed in the van & blindness in the rear," is military vernacular that refers to a speedy advance on the target by the van, or forward,...

Latest answer posted October 5, 2011, 10:20 am (UTC)

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The Triumph of Life

There is a poetic justice about Shelley's having left "The Triumph of Life" incomplete at his death. The content of the poem is like an unfinished puzzle in which Shelley poses questions about the...

Latest answer posted August 3, 2019, 3:17 am (UTC)

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The Triumph of Life

In Shelley's "The Triumph of Life," lines 248 to 291, there are only a few "similes." You may recall that a simile, defined by Dr. L. Kip Wheeler, is: ...an analogy or comparison implied by using...

Latest answer posted January 25, 2011, 3:14 am (UTC)

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The Triumph of Life

Percy Shelley's "Triumph of Life" was his last major poem. He drowned before he could finish it. It is, in a way, a tribute to the poet Dante Aligheri, written in terza rima, just as is Dante's...

Latest answer posted February 3, 2011, 11:44 am (UTC)

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The Triumph of Life

Romantic poetry was in large part a revisiting of Greek and Roman (thus “Romantic”) culture, philosophical literature, and moral values. This passage, and much of the whole poem, refers the...

Latest answer posted November 4, 2011, 4:04 am (UTC)

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The Triumph of Life

The quote you have identified comes as part of what Rousseau tells the speaker about his existence of life. It is always worth considering the quote in full before trying to establish its meaning,...

Latest answer posted November 29, 2011, 6:29 pm (UTC)

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The Triumph of Life

This is, in essence, a dependent clause, which is qualifying the independent clause in which it is contained. What this means is that these lines provide additional information about the greater...

Latest answer posted January 19, 2011, 1:38 am (UTC)

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The Triumph of Life

In lines 295 through 305, the poem’s speaker is continuing to converse with the spirit of the philosopher Jean-Jacques Rousseau, who is serving as his “leader” or guide. In the preceding lines, the...

Latest answer posted April 24, 2020, 9:21 pm (UTC)

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