This Be the Verse Questions and Answers

This Be the Verse

"This Be the Verse" is a blunt, in-your-face send up of parenthood. It's British colloquial ("mum") and modern vulgar ("They f*@# you up") in its conversational voice spoken by a swaggering male...

Latest answer posted April 22, 2010 8:14 am UTC

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This Be the Verse

Ibsen's A Doll's House and Larkin's "This Be the Verse" are both about the unhappiness in families. This might be a point of comparison that you can make between both works. However, A Doll's House...

Latest answer posted March 20, 2018 11:30 pm UTC

1 educator answer

This Be the Verse

In his poem "Requiem," Robert Louis Stevenson wrote: This be the verse you grave for me:Here he lies where he longed to be;Home is the sailor, home from sea,And the hunter home from the hill....

Latest answer posted April 13, 2021 8:42 pm UTC

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This Be the Verse

"This Be the Verse" is a short, trenchant poem which makes its point with great rhetorical force. One of Larkin's favorite techniques to create memorable phrases is alliteration. The m sounds in...

Latest answer posted April 14, 2021 12:34 am UTC

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This Be the Verse

"This Be The Verse" by Philip Larkin contains the infamous first line "They f*** you up, your mum and dad." On the face of it, Larkin's entertaining squib does not seem to have much in common with...

Latest answer posted March 19, 2018 8:01 am UTC

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This Be the Verse

In the poem "This be the verse," Phillip Larkin presents a very negative view of parents: They fill you with the faults they hadAnd add some extra, just for you. One might want to deduce from...

Latest answer posted April 27, 2010 10:44 am UTC

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This Be the Verse

The theme of Philip Larkin's "This Be the Verse" is best summed up by the first line of the poem's final stanza: Man hands on misery to man. More specifically, the theme is the way in which...

Latest answer posted April 13, 2021 7:58 pm UTC

1 educator answer