Their Eyes Were Watching God Questions and Answers

Their Eyes Were Watching God

Depending on what one emphasizes, one might settle on a different answer. The novel is easy to simplify as a coming-of-age story with Janie triumphing at the end. She is able to "sit on high" and...

Latest answer posted April 21, 2019 2:32 am UTC

2 educator answers

Their Eyes Were Watching God

The previous poster's comments are good. If you are indeed focusing specifically on Their Eyes Were Watching God and follow spottedslinky's very good suggestion to focus on the connections between...

Latest answer posted November 14, 2010 5:32 am UTC

2 educator answers

Their Eyes Were Watching God

The conflict centers on the varying opinions of what--if anything--should be done about Matt Bonner's mule. The mule is the subject that allows the town to do a great deal of teasing of Matt Bonner...

Latest answer posted May 28, 2010 2:49 am UTC

1 educator answer

Their Eyes Were Watching God

Janie gains self-knowledge as a result of her experiences with love and life. At the end of the novel, Janie understands what life offers. She has gained this insight because of her...

Latest answer posted August 21, 2015 10:43 am UTC

1 educator answer

Their Eyes Were Watching God

It's fair to say that Eatonville is a crushing disappointment for both Joe and Janie when they first arrive. It looks to all the world like the proverbial one-horse town—however, even the sole...

Latest answer posted April 9, 2019 6:44 am UTC

2 educator answers

Their Eyes Were Watching God

Like most novels, Their Eyes Were Watching God contains numerous metaphors. I do not have a list of all the metaphors in this work, though there are plenty to be found. The language throughout...

Latest answer posted October 28, 2010 2:30 am UTC

1 educator answer

Their Eyes Were Watching God

In "Their Eyes Were Watching God," Janie is ostensibly telling the story to her best friend, Pheoby Watson. The two have not seen each other in quite some time, and Janie not only tells Pheoby the...

Latest answer posted October 11, 2009 6:35 am UTC

1 educator answer

Their Eyes Were Watching God

In Their Eyes Were Watching God, Janie is on a quest for the romantic ideal—an idealized version of love that she believes will make her feel satisfied and whole. Janie wants to be swept off her...

Latest answer posted February 22, 2019 3:32 am UTC

1 educator answer

Their Eyes Were Watching God

Eatonville is a town run entirely by the black community in central Florida. It consists of only fifty acres of land, given to the blacks by Mr. Eaton, hence the name. It's the setting that frames...

Latest answer posted May 18, 2019 1:07 am UTC

2 educator answers

Their Eyes Were Watching God

Hurston's novel opens with a lyrical meditation on seeing. Men see "ships at a distance" carrying their dreams; when they do not achieve their dreams, they become broken or bitter. For women, the...

Latest answer posted November 18, 2019 4:26 am UTC

3 educator answers

Their Eyes Were Watching God

In responding to this question it seems to be that you need to analyse the various relationships that Janie has with her three husbands, and the kind of roles that are forced upon her or that she...

Latest answer posted August 11, 2011 8:45 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Their Eyes Were Watching God

In Chapter Four of Zora Neale Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God, because Janie's grandmother has been worried about Janie's "budding," she has given Janie to the much older Logan Killicks for...

Latest answer posted March 30, 2010 2:08 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Their Eyes Were Watching God

Short answer: Janie's need for love involves genuine passion and love, as well as a sense of equality and friendship. With these she is satisfied; without all of them, Janie is not happy and seeks...

Latest answer posted May 29, 2015 10:18 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Their Eyes Were Watching God

Zora Neale Hurston was strongly influenced by African American oral narrative traditions and the vernacular speech of black communities in her time. She incorporates elements from both of these...

Latest answer posted March 26, 2020 12:04 am UTC

1 educator answer

Their Eyes Were Watching God

Thematic to Their Eyes Were Watching God is the bringing of Janie's consciousness to life. Hurston's use of setting as symbol demonstrates Janie's various peregrinations as thematic of Janie's...

Latest answer posted May 21, 2014 11:08 am UTC

1 educator answer

Their Eyes Were Watching God

In Chapter 5, there is a passage in which Janie is told by Jody to "mind the store." Here we can see several aspects of African American culture in the 1920s: the mercantile, the...

Latest answer posted December 19, 2008 2:11 am UTC

1 educator answer

Their Eyes Were Watching God

We can pick out quite a lot of different literary techniques and devices at work in this passage. Think about the style of the writing, for example. The author doesn't always use full sentences;...

Latest answer posted January 12, 2021 10:25 am UTC

1 educator answer

Their Eyes Were Watching God

Collectively, the people of Eatonville create the framework through which Janie's story is told. When she first returns, she is greeted with hostility, gossip, and jealousy. Many of the citizens,...

Latest answer posted December 2, 2009 6:39 am UTC

1 educator answer

Their Eyes Were Watching God

Janie spends the grand majority of Zora Neale Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God attempting to find her own horizon. She grows up under the hand of Nanny, a former slave who looks for little...

Latest answer posted November 30, 2017 5:42 am UTC

1 educator answer

Their Eyes Were Watching God

This episode in which Janie speaks of her childhood is both comic and poignant, and it points to an important theme, which involves language and storytelling. The novel is a coming-of-age story,...

Latest answer posted January 2, 2019 3:14 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Their Eyes Were Watching God

When Janie says, "Ah been a delegate to de big 'ssociation of life," she means that she has indeed gone out into the world and experienced life on her own terms, and as a "delegate," or...

Latest answer posted March 6, 2010 6:58 am UTC

1 educator answer

Their Eyes Were Watching God

The first reason you'll like Their Eyes Were Watching God is because it reads fairly quickly, despite the colloquialisms and black southern dialect. It's a story that moves. Second, you'll enjoy...

Latest answer posted October 28, 2010 10:48 am UTC

4 educator answers

Their Eyes Were Watching God

As Chapter 1 opens, Janie Crawford returns to her home town after "burying the dead." The people of the town have come out onto their porches after having worked all day "for the man": These...

Latest answer posted December 5, 2013 6:13 am UTC

1 educator answer

Their Eyes Were Watching God

In Their Eyes Were Watching God, Janie's learning to shoot even better than Tea Cake foreshadows her having to shoot him at the end of the novel. In the setting of the novel, 1930's Florida, there...

Latest answer posted June 5, 2016 11:08 am UTC

1 educator answer

Their Eyes Were Watching God

In chapter 2 of Zora Neale Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God, Janie kisses Johnny Taylor over the fence. One spring day when Janie is still a young girl, she is under a pear tree in the yard....

Latest answer posted October 10, 2020 5:07 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Their Eyes Were Watching God

Society's expectations deeply affect Janie, the protagonist of Their Eyes Were Watching God. In a very general sense, she is subject to the judgments and biases of American society as an African...

Latest answer posted January 1, 2019 4:07 am UTC

1 educator answer

Their Eyes Were Watching God

While the timing is not precisely stated (because the novel describes seasons rather than months), clues throughout chapters 2–4 indicate that Janie's marriage to Logan Killicks lasted between one...

Latest answer posted June 2, 2019 6:58 am UTC

2 educator answers

Their Eyes Were Watching God

I don't mean to be rude by disagreeing with the previous teacher's post, but she is incorrect. Tea Cake does not use the 200 dollars gambling. Upon arriving in Jacksonville we learn that Janie has...

Latest answer posted October 11, 2009 6:53 am UTC

2 educator answers

Their Eyes Were Watching God

The opening scene offers a framing device for Janie's coming of age story. Janie is returning home, and the story offers commentary on her return as the porch sitters see her. This creates a point...

Latest answer posted April 15, 2019 3:01 am UTC

2 educator answers

Their Eyes Were Watching God

Zora Neale Hurston's Janie, in Their Eyes Were Watching God, spends the majority of the book searching for meaning and happiness. For much of the story, she is looking for a spiritual connection to...

Latest answer posted June 10, 2018 7:26 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Their Eyes Were Watching God

This question is good. It's possible to tell a lot about people (whether characters in a novel or in real life) by how they view money and how they treat other people. Zora Neale Hurston's novel...

Latest answer posted February 12, 2010 8:59 am UTC

1 educator answer

Their Eyes Were Watching God

Buzzards show up at the funeral for Matt Boner's mule. When the mule dies, the people drag it out to the swamps to have a mocking funeral. Starks actually stands on the belly of the mule as he...

Latest answer posted April 2, 2019 2:47 pm UTC

3 educator answers

Their Eyes Were Watching God

Janie's first husband, Logan Killicks is an older man whose marriage to Janie is arranged by the grandmother. Janie does not love this man. Janie's second husband is Joe Sparks, a man whom she is...

Latest answer posted April 30, 2009 2:22 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Their Eyes Were Watching God

The following sentence actually employs three different kinds of figurative language: The men noticed her firm buttocks like she had grapefruits in her hip pockets; the great rope of black hair...

Latest answer posted January 6, 2018 5:38 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Their Eyes Were Watching God

Essentially, the townspeople want to know where Janie has been and how she came to be back in Eatonville. They are a nosey bunch, used to knowing the goings-on with everyone in the town. Since...

Latest answer posted November 15, 2009 10:48 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Their Eyes Were Watching God

The novel opens with a more informal scene of judgment while the novel ends with a very literal trial scene. The opening scene describes Janie walking back into Eatonville after having spent some...

Latest answer posted December 19, 2017 7:32 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Their Eyes Were Watching God

This quotation comes at the very end of Chapter 11 when Janie and Tea Cake agree to attend the Sunday School picnic together and, in effect, announce their relationship to the town of Eatonville....

Latest answer posted May 28, 2010 3:43 am UTC

1 educator answer

Their Eyes Were Watching God

In Their Eyes Were Watching God, Zora Neale Hurston describes a social hierarchy where the white male reigns and the black female exists metaphorically as the lowly mule. Victimized at the bottom...

Latest answer posted May 26, 2015 10:57 am UTC

1 educator answer

Their Eyes Were Watching God

Joe is from Georgia, and he is a man with high ambitions. He heads out to Eatonville, Florida, because he has heard that the city will be run by Blacks, and he intends to become a big influence...

Latest answer posted March 3, 2009 2:00 am UTC

1 educator answer

Their Eyes Were Watching God

Throughout Their Eyes Were Watching God, men are physically attracted to Janie's beauty, her hair, and her light skin. We see this in the very first chapter when Janie returns to Eatonville: The...

Latest answer posted April 8, 2010 4:10 am UTC

1 educator answer

Their Eyes Were Watching God

Jim and Dave are arguing over which of them is more in love with Daisy. The boys are "act(ing) out their rivalry", and although their argument is for the most part light-hearted, "everybody...

Latest answer posted May 16, 2009 6:42 am UTC

1 educator answer

Their Eyes Were Watching God

The scenes that reveal Janie's sympathetic nature the most are the ones that involve her interaction with many of the minor characters and minor events of the novel. Unlike many of the residents of...

Latest answer posted September 5, 2010 5:30 am UTC

2 educator answers

Their Eyes Were Watching God

At first, it seems like Joe is exactly what Janie has been waiting for. He rescues her from Logan & takes her to Eatonville, where he can succeed in a way impossible in other towns. Although...

Latest answer posted March 15, 2010 6:42 am UTC

1 educator answer

Their Eyes Were Watching God

In the first few decades of her life, Janie is controlled by forces beyond herself, most notably her grandmother and Logan Killicks. Yet when Joe Starks comes along, she makes the choice to leave...

Latest answer posted March 28, 2010 2:31 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Their Eyes Were Watching God

Annie Tyler is a character mentioned in Janie's memory as she weighs her decision to disregard the warnings and opinions of the townsfolk and run away to a new life with Tea Cake. The eNotes...

Latest answer posted June 12, 2011 3:32 am UTC

1 educator answer

Their Eyes Were Watching God

In order to support such a statement, we would need to examine the motives of the various characters who do hurt Janie: her grandmother, Logan Killicks, Joe Starks, and Tea Cake. In all four of...

Latest answer posted September 4, 2010 4:40 am UTC

2 educator answers

Their Eyes Were Watching God

I assume by "here" you are referring to the portion of the novel when Tea Cake and Janie move onto the muck, the Everglades. On the porches of Eatonville, and in particular on the store's porch,...

Latest answer posted May 26, 2010 12:50 am UTC

1 educator answer

Their Eyes Were Watching God

Their Eyes Were Watching God is an American novel, yet the novel creates a universal—or “global”—atmosphere with its opening image of a ship at sea. The boundless ship suggests that the themes and...

Latest answer posted January 9, 2021 3:06 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Their Eyes Were Watching God

In Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God, Pheoby's moral code differs from that of the town in that she is genuinely concerned about what has happened to Janie. In the first chapter of the novel,...

Latest answer posted March 12, 2016 3:05 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Their Eyes Were Watching God

Jody Starks — who’s sometimes called Joe Starks — is not white. Jody is a person of color. Jody and his wife, Janie, move to Eatonville. Eatonville is an all-Black city. If Jody was white,...

Latest answer posted October 10, 2020 4:04 pm UTC

1 educator answer

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