The Son's Veto Questions and Answers

The Son's Veto

In the short story "The Son's Veto" by Thomas Hardy, the author uses several symbols and metaphors. For example, in the opening of the story, Hardy describes the mother's "nut-brown hair" which is...

Latest answer posted March 21, 2016, 2:31 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Son's Veto

Sophy is presented as an intricate, worthy character through the metaphor of her beautiful woven hair. One lack she may have as a character is a low emotional level: she doesn't seem to get very...

Latest answer posted November 25, 2012, 8:46 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Son's Veto

The ending of "The Son's Veto" is veiled in suggestion on purpose to give the reader a moment of mild horror at the reality of Sophy's situation and of Randolph's inner traits. The resolution is...

Latest answer posted December 7, 2011, 1:47 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Son's Veto

The question of responsibility is an interesting one. There is a real sense in which it might be said that none of the characters have responsibility for what happened to them, with two significant...

Latest answer posted May 14, 2012, 10:41 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Son's Veto

Social class is an important theme and background element of setting in Hardy's story. There are several comparisons he makes in very few words as he exposes and presents the divides of social...

Latest answer posted May 15, 2012, 2:22 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Son's Veto

[S]he seemed to be pining her heart away. 'Why mayn't I say to Sam that I'll marry him? Why mayn't I?'....Some four years after this date a middle-aged man was standing at ... [his ] fruiterer's...

Latest answer posted May 14, 2012, 2:23 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Son's Veto

Hardy uses description, setting and characterization in the beginning of the story to establish and develop Sophy as a character we readily sympathize with, this despite the fact she is "an...

Latest answer posted October 28, 2012, 3:22 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Son's Veto

Randolph veto's his mother's plan of marrying Sam, the sweetheart of her youth. After she is widowed by Vicar Twycott's death, she encounters Sam one day as if by chance, though he willingly...

Latest answer posted December 7, 2011, 1:02 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Son's Veto

The opening to Thomas Hardy's "The Son's Veto" could confuse readers as to what it is about. Compounding the reader's confusion is the man's confusion: "the nut-brown hair was a wonder and a...

Latest answer posted October 19, 2013, 6:10 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Son's Veto

Several moral lessons can be drawn from Hardy's intricate short story. One of these involves Sophy and Sam; one involves Vicar Twycott; one involves Twycott and Randolf. The moral lesson to be...

Latest answer posted May 15, 2012, 7:36 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Son's Veto

Situational irony can be defined as something happening that takes both the reader and the characters involved by surprise, as everything seemed to be leading up to a different outcome. This can be...

Latest answer posted April 30, 2013, 5:32 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Son's Veto

Are you asking for an essay question that you could use to respond to this text, or are you asking for possible essay questions that you may be given? If it is the former, you obviously have...

Latest answer posted January 22, 2012, 6:50 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Son's Veto

Both Sophy in "The Son's Veto" and the narrator in "Sandpiper" are women who are described as being profoundly dislocated by their current station and position in life. In "Sandpiper," the narrator...

Latest answer posted February 5, 2013, 7:03 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Son's Veto

Thomas Hardy's, "The Son's Veto," and the short story, "A Fly in the Ointment" by D. H. Lawrence both tell stories of boys and their mothers. In "The Son's Veto," the mother is a commoner who...

Latest answer posted September 4, 2011, 1:58 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Son's Veto

This is a difficult question because it is not at all clear from the text that the other characters do misunderstand Sophy and view her differently from what she really is. On the other hand, it is...

Latest answer posted November 25, 2012, 10:24 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Son's Veto

Detestable is a very strong word, even for Randolph. The synonyms of "detestable" are abhor, abominate, loath, hate. These describe appropriate reactions toward a mass murderer, but not toward...

Latest answer posted May 15, 2012, 6:41 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Son's Veto

Hardy presents the tragedy in "The Son's Veto" by presenting time, a compelled sworn oath, education and clerical practice, a neat black suit and a funeral procession, a black glowering cloud and a...

Latest answer posted September 12, 2011, 3:03 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Son's Veto

Predestination is the religious belief that states events in a person's life are ordered in advance by the divinity honored by the religious belief. Predestination is similar to Fate and Destiny in...

Latest answer posted October 14, 2012, 8:53 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Son's Veto

Readers feel very sympathetically toward Sophy right from the start. Hardy does a very interesting thing with (1) setting to build sympathy toward Sophy, which works in conjunction with the (2)...

Latest answer posted December 24, 2012, 10:43 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Son's Veto

Sam is an interesting character. There are three prominent sections where we find out the most about Sam. A good question that emerges is whether or not Sam underwent character development (change...

Latest answer posted June 20, 2013, 4:50 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Son's Veto

Sophy and Sam Hobson are certainly sympathetic characters, but Randolph is an interesting puzzle, making the story harder to understand. The story starts with a frame that includes the third person...

Latest answer posted May 14, 2012, 4:40 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Son's Veto

It might be said that the theme of "The Son's Veto" is introduced at the end of the first paragraph: "seemed a reckless waste of successful fabrication." Here, of course, the narrator is speaking...

Latest answer posted November 21, 2012, 2:38 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Son's Veto

Sympathy is felt for Sophy because she is an honorable person in a setting that does not seem to validate individual honor. Sophy is not a bad person. She is constantly being derided by her son,...

Latest answer posted August 16, 2013, 9:40 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Son's Veto

Hardy's introductory description of Sophy at the open-air park concert is in some ways simple yet, in other ways, complex. Some of the simple elements of Hardy's description are the details about...

Latest answer posted December 12, 2011, 12:13 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Son's Veto

We have two perspectives on Sam Hobson from which to draw elements for a character sketch. The first is when he is introduced in the flashback description of Sophy's early life while the second is...

Latest answer posted November 21, 2012, 3:29 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Son's Veto

As the main protagonist of the story, Randolph Twycott is a very memorable character, but what makes him the most interesting is his false sense of superiority and grandiose. His mother is poor and...

Latest answer posted August 18, 2019, 5:31 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Son's Veto

As in all literary questions, our ideas of what Sophy might think and write must be guided by the text and may be guided by what we know of the author's aesthetic theory, specifically the author's...

Latest answer posted March 10, 2013, 6:18 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Son's Veto

There are two main tacks Hardy uses to present Sophy's tragedy. The first is that he presents her as innocent of blame. The second is that he presents her as a victim of the Twycotts (name meaning:...

Latest answer posted December 24, 2012, 8:11 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Son's Veto

Hardy's chronologically told story starts with an event calculated to provide an in-depth character sketch of the heroine and her son Randolph. They are at a public concert in a "neighboring...

Latest answer posted December 7, 2011, 7:59 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Son's Veto

Sophy's upbringing has a lot to do with her sadness in the midst of this story. Growing up in a rural village in England isn't exactly an upper class existence, so Sophy marries into a better...

Latest answer posted July 22, 2011, 2:02 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Son's Veto

Randolf is a young man who has been given every advantage and who associates with the best of his own generation because of his enrollment in a prestigious English public school (which are...

Latest answer posted December 6, 2011, 1:29 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Son's Veto

Hardy develops Randolph's character in two very interesting though contradictory ways: (1) name symbolism for what Sophy hopes he will be; (2) behavior and surname symbolism for what he is....

Latest answer posted December 24, 2012, 11:19 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Son's Veto

That question of grammar bore upon her history, and she fell into reverie, of a somewhat sad kind to all appearance. It might have been assumed that she was wondering if she had done wisely in...

Latest answer posted October 23, 2013, 2:33 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Son's Veto

Hardy seems to have little problem in depicting the son in a very intensely cold manner. Sophy finds herself almost imprisoned by the wishes of her son. There is a fundamental collision between...

Latest answer posted September 4, 2013, 10:44 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Son's Veto

The character of Sophy is developed in terms of her relations with her setting and also in particular her son. As she was raised through marriage to a middle-class life from her humbler...

Latest answer posted February 4, 2013, 8:54 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Son's Veto

It is always very difficult to answer hypothetical situations of this nature. However, looking at the clues in the text, it becomes clear that Mrs. Twycott would have waited until her son had died...

Latest answer posted August 27, 2013, 7:34 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Son's Veto

Sophy made one very significant sacrifice for her son Randolph and it had very sad effects for her and perhaps also for Randolph. After the death of the Reverend Twycott, Sophy's learned and...

Latest answer posted July 6, 2011, 3:32 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Son's Veto

The theme of relationship revolves around Sophy's relationships: Sophy and Sam Hobson; Sophy and Vicar Twycott; Sophy and Randolph. A secondary but influential relationship is that inferred between...

Latest answer posted December 8, 2011, 2:08 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Son's Veto

Hardy isn't noted for writing satire, which is what "ridicule" is most commonly associated with. His characters are more noted for tracing reality, albeit painful reality. His characters are not...

Latest answer posted September 30, 2013, 1:49 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Son's Veto

I find this story incredibly sad. To me, it is about how a son became so selfish that all he cared about was himself. His mother sacrificed everything for him, and he would not let her have...

Latest answer posted October 24, 2012, 8:09 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Son's Veto

One important point about the three dominant characters is their names: Sophy, Mr. Twycott and Randolph Twycott. Sophy is a name from the Greek meaning 'wise' or 'wisdom'. This is very important to...

Latest answer posted November 2, 2012, 3:31 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Son's Veto

The summary of this excellent short story is one of the enduring power of class and how it can bring misery to our lives. The story centres on Sophie Twycott, who, at the beginning of the story, is...

Latest answer posted January 22, 2012, 3:40 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Son's Veto

I think that the statement is absolutely correct when one looks at Sophy's life. Hardy depicts Sophy as an individual whose will is crushed in many different ways. The institutions of marriage...

Latest answer posted November 10, 2013, 12:51 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Son's Veto

Hi there! I will suggest some angles you can pursue for questions 1 and 2. 1) How does Thomas Hardy make Sophy particularly memorable? Here, you could possible talk about how Hardy describes her....

Latest answer posted April 16, 2015, 6:08 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Son's Veto

You original question read "incapable poor woman who is able to shape her own life." This contradiction must be sorted out as either "incapable poor woman" and "unable to shape her own life" or as...

Latest answer posted March 10, 2013, 7:15 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Son's Veto

This question has been answered at the link below:

Latest answer posted December 7, 2011, 8:12 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Son's Veto

There are several reasons that Sophy is characterized by Hardy as a victim in this social protest short story (Hardy was a great champion against what he saw as entrenched social injustice toward...

Latest answer posted November 8, 2013, 1:49 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Son's Veto

The correct way to ask this question is "How does Hardy depict ..." or "How does Sophy represent ..." the telling moments in Sophy's life. "Depict" means to draw, describe, delineate. These are...

Latest answer posted August 20, 2013, 10:55 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Son's Veto

To write an empathetic account of Sam's thoughts as Sophy rolls by, forever out of his reach, you need to focus on the last information we have about his suit for Sophy's hand. You might also want...

Latest answer posted May 15, 2012, 3:56 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Son's Veto

The similar theme ("central idea") in Hardy's "The Son's Veto" and Pritchett's "The Fly in the Ointment" is parent-child relationships. In "The Son's Veto," Sophy (widow of Vicar Twycott, and...

Latest answer posted May 16, 2012, 5:42 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Showing 1-50 of 57