Questions and Answers for The Brook

The Brook

"The Brook" by Alfred, Lord Tennyson is written in what is called ballad or common meter, a form used for traditional ballads, hymns, and many narrative poems, especially in the Romantic and...

Latest answer posted June 16, 2015 10:18 pm UTC

2 educator answers

The Brook

Alfred, Lord Tennyson makes great use of personification in his poem “The Brook.” Personification is giving human qualities to inanimate objects. In Tennyson’s poem, he uses personification to...

Latest answer posted August 24, 2015 10:56 pm UTC

1 educator answer

The Brook

Tennyson's use of onomatopoeia throughout this poem helps to create the effect of a brook bubbling, like the titular brook, down a valley. Tennyson uses alliteration—a "sudden sally" and a...

Latest answer posted January 28, 2019 2:59 pm UTC

2 educator answers

The Brook

A refrain can be a phrase, a line or a couple of lines repeated at regular intervals in a piece of music or verse. Poets often employ this literary device to enhance the musical effect in their...

Latest answer posted May 9, 2016 6:56 pm UTC

2 educator answers

The Brook

Tennyson uses onomatopoeic language throughout the poem to mimic the sound of the brook. In the first stanza, the brook is described as "sparkl(ing)" and "bicker(ing)." The repetition of the "k"...

Latest answer posted November 5, 2019 9:55 pm UTC

1 educator answer

The Brook

Tennyson's poem "The Brook" is written from the perspective of an indefatigable brook which goes on "for ever" regardless of what it encounters on its travels. The speaker, the personified brook,...

Latest answer posted June 23, 2018 6:11 pm UTC

1 educator answer

The Brook

"The Brook" by Alfred, Lord Tennyson reveals various literary devices including alliteration, all of which contribute to its purpose. The poem expresses the benefits of perseverance and offers its...

Latest answer posted August 31, 2015 7:52 pm UTC

1 educator answer

The Brook

Coots are small water birds with large webbed feet. A brook would therefore be its natural habitat. Unfortunately for coots, they're also quite popular birds to hunt. In "The Brook" Tennyson uses...

Latest answer posted July 3, 2019 6:02 am UTC

1 educator answer

The Brook

"The Brook" describes the eponymous brook's journey through different landscapes, and the poem is narrated by the brook itself. The given quotation comprises the eleventh stanza. The first line...

Latest answer posted September 20, 2019 3:47 pm UTC

1 educator answer

The Brook

The "I" in the poem is the eponymous brook. In other words, the poem is narrated by the imagined voice of the brook. A brook is a small stream. Throughout the poem, the brook describes its journey...

Latest answer posted July 31, 2019 10:28 pm UTC

1 educator answer

The Brook

In Tennyson's "The Brook," the brook endures forever and ever. In the sunlight, it "sparkles out," meaning it glints brightly in the sunshine when it is not in the shadow of the ferns. The brook...

Latest answer posted March 21, 2019 10:43 am UTC

1 educator answer

The Brook

I would actually encourage you to see the poem as presenting the opposite idea: that the brook in this poem maintains its identity, asserting itself again and again as something permanent: "For men...

Latest answer posted May 3, 2016 2:58 am UTC

1 educator answer

The Brook

The meter of this poem, known as common meter or ballad meter, was actually very frequently used in ballads, hymns, and poetry of the Romantic and Victorian periods. Contra the second paragraph...

Latest answer posted September 25, 2018 6:23 pm UTC

1 educator answer

The Brook

The answer to your question lies in the second verse of the poem: By thirty hills I hurry down,Or slip between the ridges,By twenty thorpes, a little town,And half a hundred bridges. You've...

Latest answer posted August 11, 2019 9:07 pm UTC

1 educator answer

The Brook

In stanza one, the tinkling sound of the brook is onomatopoeically implied by the sibilance of the words "sudden sally . . . sparkle." In the last line of the same stanza, the brook is described as...

Latest answer posted August 13, 2019 5:33 pm UTC

1 educator answer