Tess of the d'Urbervilles Questions and Answers

Tess of the d'Urbervilles

It's difficult to know whether or not the term "fate" accurately describes the philosophy at the center of Tess of the d'Urbervilles and other works by Hardy. Fate implies a force beyond human...

Latest answer posted July 20, 2019, 1:27 am (UTC)

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Tess of the d'Urbervilles

If by justified we mean, does Tess deserve to be hanged for killing Alec, I would say no. The subtitle of the novel, which causes controversy at the time, is "A Pure Woman," and I agree that Tess...

Latest answer posted July 5, 2019, 12:42 am (UTC)

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Tess of the d'Urbervilles

One of the themes of the novel is the power and truth of nature and pagan religions over Christianity. At the beginning of the book, Tess is dancing in a May Day festival, and Hardy writes: "The...

Latest answer posted April 7, 2017, 12:40 pm (UTC)

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Tess of the d'Urbervilles

Hardy was a naturalist, part of a Darwinist-influenced literary movement at the end of the nineteenth and beginning of the twentieth century that saw nature as indifferent to humankind. He also was...

Latest answer posted December 3, 2017, 11:25 am (UTC)

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Tess of the d'Urbervilles

As you know, Thomas Hardy considered Tess in Tess of the D'Urbervilles a pure woman since the subtitle of the work is "A Pure Woman." I have not taught or researched the novel, so you may get a...

Latest answer posted February 17, 2010, 9:00 am (UTC)

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Tess of the d'Urbervilles

The subtitle of the novel, A Pure Woman Faithfully Presented, leads us to the heart of Hardy's intention. "Faithfully Presented" speaks to Hardy's naturalism: the phrase tells us that, in this...

Latest answer posted July 19, 2019, 3:58 pm (UTC)

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Tess of the d'Urbervilles

The subtitle is important to know about because it was part of a tremendous controversy that Hardy's book ignited surrounding what was called by his Victorian society "the Woman question." This...

Latest answer posted February 16, 2013, 2:18 pm (UTC)

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Tess of the d'Urbervilles

Hardy's feminist perspective can be seen on the very cover of the novel. The book's full title is Tess of the d'Urbervilles: A Pure Woman Faithfully Presented. His description of Tess as pure goes...

Latest answer posted June 9, 2016, 7:02 pm (UTC)

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Tess of the d'Urbervilles

As with any great author, it's hard to identify a single point or theme that is expressive of Hardy's overall vision. I would focus, however, on the "randomness" of the way the universe operates...

Latest answer posted July 2, 2018, 7:43 pm (UTC)

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Tess of the d'Urbervilles

Hardy's subtitle, A Pure Woman Faithfully Presented, gets to the heart of his intentions. First, even though Tess would be considered a fallen, impure woman by most of her society, Hardy wants to...

Latest answer posted November 25, 2018, 8:31 pm (UTC)

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Tess of the d'Urbervilles

In Thomas Hardy's poignant narrative of Tess of the D'Ubervilles, the plight of the repressed woman in Victorian Times is clearly evident. Women were expected to be frail and virtuous--Tess is...

Latest answer posted June 17, 2010, 1:08 am (UTC)

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Tess of the d'Urbervilles

Angel causes Tess more suffering because she loves and believes in him, only to be cruelly rejected. Alec, although he "ruins" her by "seducing" (raping) and impregnating her when she is very...

Latest answer posted June 12, 2019, 10:59 am (UTC)

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Tess of the d'Urbervilles

In a traditional tragedy, it is fate, sin, or a combination of the two that ushers in the tragic events. For example, in Oedipus Rex, the gods have decreed that Oedipus will kill his father and...

Latest answer posted August 9, 2019, 11:41 am (UTC)

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Tess of the d'Urbervilles

In Hardy's naturalism, nature is not full of signs of God's purpose or wonder, but is largely indifferent to the fate of Hardy's characters. Protagonists and antagonists alike are crushed as...

Latest answer posted April 16, 2017, 4:29 pm (UTC)

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Tess of the d'Urbervilles

Important literary elements in Tess of the D'Urbervilles are the pathetic fallacy, synesthesia, tragic irony, and omniscient narrative. A good starting point is examining the way Hardy's use of the...

Latest answer posted January 24, 2010, 4:05 am (UTC)

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Tess of the d'Urbervilles

Chance plays a big role in the story of Tess. In the first chapter, Tess’s father, John Durbeyfield, has a chance meeting with Parson Tringham in the road. The parson, as a joke, addresses him as...

Latest answer posted April 14, 2018, 1:01 pm (UTC)

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Tess of the d'Urbervilles

Alec is a rich and entitled man, who thinks he can take whatever he wants from the world and from the people around him. He tries to woo Tess when he first meets her, but she's too proud and...

Latest answer posted September 29, 2019, 3:25 pm (UTC)

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Tess of the d'Urbervilles

Tess's author, Thomas Hardy was a Fatalist, and Tess arguably more than any of Hardy's other novels demonstrates his literary philosophy. Most of the horrible events in Tess's life result not from...

Latest answer posted June 17, 2010, 6:50 am (UTC)

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Tess of the d'Urbervilles

Naturalism as a literary movement is distinct from Romanticism or Realism in that it takes a detached, dispassionate view of human life. As the eNote on naturalism puts it: Naturalism applies both...

Latest answer posted April 1, 2016, 1:01 am (UTC)

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Tess of the d'Urbervilles

The way in which the title of this novel by Thomas Hardy Tess of d'Ubrevilles may affect the readers is by giving a false impression that the main character is a well-to-do person with a strong,...

Latest answer posted October 5, 2011, 1:52 am (UTC)

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Tess of the d'Urbervilles

This phrase occurs in "Tess of the d'Urbervilles" when Angel remarks that Tess has the "ache of modernism" which seems to refer to Hardy's dislike, as Marcelle Clements writes in the introduction,...

Latest answer posted May 3, 2009, 3:57 am (UTC)

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Tess of the d'Urbervilles

The text does not confirm the idea that Tess's life was one of "constant movement between hope and despair." The definition of "constant" is something that is not changing, not variable; something...

Latest answer posted February 16, 2013, 10:31 pm (UTC)

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Tess of the d'Urbervilles

It seems in Hardy's novel that murder and betrayal are not controlled directly by the characters in the novel. The plot is mired by tragedy after tragedy, all of which appear to be completely out...

Latest answer posted November 5, 2008, 3:04 am (UTC)

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Tess of the d'Urbervilles

Among other language techniques, Hardy uses dialogue and dialect to characterize Tess and Angel. Hardy also evokes an indifferent universe and shows the seductive appeal of the dairy through his...

Latest answer posted November 3, 2020, 2:55 pm (UTC)

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Tess of the d'Urbervilles

The quotation refers to the main character of the novel, Tess. She is a victim of rape, and feels tremendous guilt because of the loss of her purity. She blames herself throughout the novel for the...

Latest answer posted December 8, 2008, 1:49 am (UTC)

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Tess of the d'Urbervilles

In "Tess of D'Urbervilles" the story is told with third person omniscient—meaning the narrator is outside of the story but can see and hear the thoughts and emotions of every character in the...

Latest answer posted May 12, 2019, 2:34 pm (UTC)

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Tess of the d'Urbervilles

Tess of the d'Urbevilles is a social tragedy in that it shows how, at that time in English history, one's fate was inextricably bound up with one's class. Tess may fondly imagine that she has blue...

Latest answer posted June 26, 2019, 6:31 am (UTC)

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Tess of the d'Urbervilles

Tess is seduced, not raped; although, it might as well be called rape due to the many variables that weakened her before succumbing to Alec's selfish desires. On page 45 on the enotes.com etext...

Latest answer posted May 3, 2012, 5:01 pm (UTC)

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Tess of the d'Urbervilles

Thomas Hardy’s 1891 novel, Tess of the d’Urbervilles: A Pure Woman Faithfully Presented, can be read as a cautionary tale that explores women as objects of male consumption. For instance, Hardy...

Latest answer posted June 19, 2013, 5:38 pm (UTC)

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Tess of the d'Urbervilles

In more modern criticisms of Hardy's novel, there are those who perceive Tess Duberyfield as a true Humanist, ...a human being free of supernaturalism...a part of nature [who] holds that values-be...

Latest answer posted April 8, 2014, 11:26 pm (UTC)

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Tess of the d'Urbervilles

The word "tincture" means to have a trace of something, or a small amount. In this quote, Tess is a carrier of surface-level emotion without a trace of life's experience to guide her through any...

Latest answer posted May 11, 2012, 5:57 pm (UTC)

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Tess of the d'Urbervilles

By the time Hardy wrote Tess of the D'Urbervilles, he was a successful novelist with an established reputation. Earlier in his career, under the advice of such mentors as Leslie Stephen, Virginia...

Latest answer posted July 5, 2019, 11:29 am (UTC)

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Tess of the d'Urbervilles

Realism, with regard to literature, is a relative term. Thomas Hardy's novels, in my view, exemplify realism more fully than other English writers of his time and earlier, but less than a...

Latest answer posted September 17, 2019, 10:44 pm (UTC)

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Tess of the d'Urbervilles

According to Veidemanis (see the source below), Polanski's 1979 film of the Hardy novel portrays Tess as passive, weak, and childlike. However, Hardy conveys the strength and unrelenting quality of...

Latest answer posted March 5, 2019, 12:37 am (UTC)

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Tess of the d'Urbervilles

Hardy shows aristocratic lineage to be a fraud in Tess of the D'Urbervilles. Although Tess's parents are delighted to discover what they believe to be aristocratic ("knightly") roots through their...

Latest answer posted October 30, 2019, 11:43 pm (UTC)

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Tess of the d'Urbervilles

In one of his novels, Thomas Hardy quotes the German author Hardenberg, declaring that "character is fate." Indeed, there may be no character in literature to whom this better applies than Hardy's...

Latest answer posted June 10, 2015, 5:22 pm (UTC)

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Tess of the d'Urbervilles

Clearly, Hardy believes that Tess is a pure woman. He says so in the subtitle to the work and he often refers to her as pure or innocent. So the author clearly sees Tess's purity. Scholars argue...

Latest answer posted December 22, 2010, 10:52 pm (UTC)

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Tess of the d'Urbervilles

If you are answering this question then you must consider the novel as a TRAGEDY - the outcome is already pre-determined, fated. Tess, of course, is a character but on a symbolic level she...

Latest answer posted May 30, 2010, 3:04 am (UTC)

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Tess of the d'Urbervilles

When you set out to write a close analysis of any text, you must first read the piece carefully, paying close attention to the details. After all, an analysis seeks to break down a text into its...

Latest answer posted October 5, 2020, 6:36 pm (UTC)

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Tess of the d'Urbervilles

This is certainly a theme that is explored within the text through the life of Tess. It is important to remember that the laws and customs that we accept as being so integral to our lives as humans...

Latest answer posted November 30, 2012, 6:52 am (UTC)

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Tess of the d'Urbervilles

Answering this question largely depends on how we perceive the role of women in the rural society of Hardy's day. According to the prevailing moral standards, Tess is to blame for her own...

Latest answer posted August 16, 2018, 8:52 am (UTC)

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Tess of the d'Urbervilles

Hardy depicts conventional religion and morality as cruel and destructive forces. Tess has a pure heart. She is a victim, raped by Alec, but she is morally condemned by her society for being...

Latest answer posted December 21, 2017, 12:40 pm (UTC)

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Tess of the d'Urbervilles

Bird symbolism can be important in Hardy. Tess is identified with herons not only in terms of The Heron Inn but also when she arrives at the dairy. It is worth quoting the passage below at length,...

Latest answer posted July 7, 2019, 1:21 am (UTC)

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Tess of the d'Urbervilles

The conflicts of the story include all that you list. Certainly one conflict is "man" vs. "woman" because Tess is raped by a man, which triggers the rest of the story. However,...

Latest answer posted November 1, 2007, 11:08 am (UTC)

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Tess of the d'Urbervilles

Tess of the d’Urbervilles was written by Victorian novelist and poet Thomas Hardy in 1891. It tells the story of poor farm girl Tess Durbeyfield whose father discovers that their family is...

Latest answer posted May 16, 2019, 1:52 pm (UTC)

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Tess of the d'Urbervilles

In "Tess of the d'Urbervilles," the quote "Remember my Lady, I was your master once! I will be your master again," is significant because it is a foreshadowing of what fate has...

Latest answer posted December 25, 2008, 3:12 pm (UTC)

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Tess of the d'Urbervilles

It is difficult to measure the intention of a novelist when writing a piece of literature, for their might be ostensible and subconscious motives involved. These are often referred to as the text...

Latest answer posted October 19, 2007, 4:16 am (UTC)

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Tess of the d'Urbervilles

[Please note that eNotes policy permits only one question and answer per post. I've edited your question accordingly.] The separation of Angel and Tess begins on their wedding night before they...

Latest answer posted February 16, 2013, 9:18 pm (UTC)

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Tess of the d'Urbervilles

Of the two men, Alec d'Urberville is obviously the worse one in his treatment of and general attitude toward women. He rapes Tess and later makes no apology or attempt to help her with their child....

Latest answer posted February 9, 2019, 4:06 am (UTC)

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Tess of the d'Urbervilles

Tess of the d'Urbervilles by Thomas Hardy focuses on how love and sex affect the life of a young woman, Tess, from a peasant family in the fictitious English county of Wessex. The basic plot of...

Latest answer posted June 9, 2015, 8:11 pm (UTC)

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