Tartuffe Questions and Answers

Tartuffe

French playwright Jean-Baptiste Poquelin, better known as Molière, first wrote Tartuffe in 1663–1664. This first version of the play was immediately banned by King Louis XIV in response to...

Latest answer posted September 28, 2020 3:05 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Tartuffe

French playwright Moliere, born Jean-Baptiste Poquelin (1622–1673), wrote his comic masterpiece Tartuffe in 1663–1664. The first version of the play—which was never published, and for which no text...

Latest answer posted August 19, 2020 3:28 am UTC

1 educator answer

Tartuffe

Moliere uses rhyming couplets in Tartuffe and each line of the play has the same number of syllables: twelve. Moliere uses rhyme because this is a madcap, fast-paced comedy, and the rhyme scheme...

Latest answer posted March 25, 2019 10:13 pm UTC

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Tartuffe

Farce is a comic style, signifying broad, unsubtle, uncharactered, often physical humor appealing to the “lower” audience appetite, often associated with vaudeville, slapstick routines, and raucous...

Latest answer posted March 26, 2013 6:27 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Tartuffe

In Tartuffe by Molière, the actual character Tartuffe does not enter the scene until the third act of the play. However, Molière is able to establish Tartuffe's hypocrisy beforehand through what...

Latest answer posted January 19, 2020 3:47 am UTC

4 educator answers

Tartuffe

Metaphors are figures of speech that make comparisons of two unrelated things. The comparisons are not literally true, but help to explain the ideas an author is attempting to relate to readers or...

Latest answer posted March 4, 2020 12:53 am UTC

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Tartuffe

As was traditional in the seventeenth century setting of Moliere's Tartuffe, in which the French aristocracy was in power, the society was a patriarchal one. As such, Orgon is clearly the head of...

Latest answer posted October 2, 2012 4:02 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Tartuffe

Tartuffe, or The Impostor, or The Hypocrite, was written by Molière in 1664, at a time when the Académie française was actively involved in regulating French language, grammar, and literature,...

Latest answer posted February 21, 2020 11:41 pm UTC

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Tartuffe

Dorine is very much a stock character: the "wise servant." In this role, she acts almost as a Greek chorus, supplying the audience with a running commentary on events. She highlights certain...

Latest answer posted May 5, 2019 5:10 am UTC

2 educator answers

Tartuffe

In Tartuffe, the conflict between Mariane and Valere comes about because of her father's, Orgon's, betrayal in reneging on his permission for Mariane's marriage to Valere and insistence that...

Latest answer posted March 26, 2010 1:37 pm UTC

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Tartuffe

In the first scene of Tartuffe, Molière sets out to introduce and define as many characters in the play as possible, while setting the scene and providing the audience with the information they...

Latest answer posted October 25, 2019 8:42 pm UTC

3 educator answers

Tartuffe

Tartuffe, by Jean-Baptiste Poquelin, known as "Moliere," is a satirical attack on religious hypocrisy. The first version of Tartuffe was banned by King Louis XIV of France in 1664. The second...

Latest answer posted September 25, 2019 8:20 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Tartuffe

The character of Tartuffe in Molière's Christian play Tartuffe is the prime example of deceit and deception. He passes himself off as a pious and religious man who is occupied with giving charity...

Latest answer posted July 19, 2010 3:46 am UTC

1 educator answer

Tartuffe

Like all successful con artists, Tartuffe is a master in manipulating others; however, only Orgon and his mother, Madame Pernelle, fall for his pious act, unable to see Tartuffe's selfish motives....

Latest answer posted February 14, 2010 6:54 am UTC

1 educator answer

Tartuffe

One of Moliere's most fully developed characters, Dorine is probably an audience's favorite. As the play turns upon the mutual confidence of the two figures who believe they have control of their...

Latest answer posted June 26, 2013 7:30 am UTC

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Tartuffe

The characters in Moliere's Tartuffe, or The Imposter use masks and deception in order to get what they want. As suggested by the title, Tartuffe is an imposter and hypocrite who pretends to be a...

Latest answer posted April 1, 2019 4:40 pm UTC

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Tartuffe

To paraphrase Samuel Johnson, substituting false piety for patriotism, hypocrisy “is the last refuge of scoundrels.” In Tartuffe, master of the house Orgon is overawed by all-around holy man...

Latest answer posted January 19, 2019 5:07 pm UTC

4 educator answers

Tartuffe

In Molière's comedy Tartuffe, we see women who challenge or support the traditional roles of women in terms of the power structures of Molière's time. After Orgon introduces Tartuffe—the scam...

Latest answer posted January 25, 2011 12:46 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Tartuffe

You clearly have been given some excellent advice relating to the answer. I will focus on the essay question: How are the other characters in "Tartuffe" employed to develop the theme of hypocrisy...

Latest answer posted October 16, 2010 2:44 pm UTC

3 educator answers

Tartuffe

The thinkers of the eighteenth century, the era that became known as the Enlightenment, emphasized the tensions between reason (intellect and logic) and passion, which included emotion and physical...

Latest answer posted September 28, 2019 8:10 pm UTC

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Tartuffe

Although the characters in Tartuffe mention Heaven quite a lot, seeming to use the word in reference to not just "God" but also "fate" and, of course, a literal afterlife, perhaps the most...

Latest answer posted June 21, 2016 9:11 pm UTC

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Tartuffe

In Tartuffe, Elmire, unlike her husband, perceives people realistically. In Act III, during her conversation with Tartuffe, Elmire confims her opinion of him: he is arrogant and lustful, although...

Latest answer posted May 6, 2010 8:21 am UTC

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Tartuffe

Adopting the stage name Molière, Jean Baptiste Poquelin composed a dozen satirical dramas, the most famous of which is Tartuffe. It should be noted that during his lifetime as a popular dramatist,...

Latest answer posted February 19, 2020 3:16 pm UTC

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Tartuffe

In Act I, Madame Pernelle, who uses stereotypes to characterize everyone around her as a "fool," "perfect rake," "nothing but a plague" and platitudes such as "still waters...are the deepest,"...

Latest answer posted June 26, 2013 1:34 am UTC

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Tartuffe

In Moliere's Tartuffe, socially, almost all hold the same position. Dorine is Mariane's lady's maid—and the exception. Dorine is "only" a lady's maid, but she is strong and sensible, and does not...

Latest answer posted May 8, 2012 8:22 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Tartuffe

Religious hypocrisy is satirized in Tartuffe through the character of Tartuffe, a con artist who pretends to be a particularly pious Christian. As other characters, like Cleante, who are not...

Latest answer posted January 13, 2021 11:57 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Tartuffe

In Moliere's seventeenth-century farce Tartuffe, the playwright does not formally introduce the title character until the second scene of the third act. Writers sometimes use this method,...

Latest answer posted June 17, 2010 3:46 pm UTC

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Tartuffe

In response to Madame Pernelle's worries about rumors and criticism directed at Orgon's family, Dorine names two acquaintances, "Daphne and her little husband," but more importantly identifies the...

Latest answer posted February 21, 2010 4:51 am UTC

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Tartuffe

Classical comedy is strongly normative. It is by its nature conservative, making fun of people who transgress social norms and expectations and coming to a happy ending or resolution when the...

Latest answer posted December 12, 2017 12:22 pm UTC

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Tartuffe

In Act III, Scene 3 of Tartuffe, the licentious Tartuffe, a stage imitator of a religious hypocrite, talks with Elmire, who wishes to discuss her husband's plans about having Tartuffe marry his...

Latest answer posted January 22, 2014 4:02 am UTC

1 educator answer

Tartuffe

Tartuffe represents religious hypocrisy. He cons Orgon by pretending to be a religiously devoted and pious person who denies himself and spends his time involved in charitable works to help the...

Latest answer posted March 9, 2019 8:12 am UTC

3 educator answers

Tartuffe

One of the biggest central motifs in this brilliant and hilarious play comes from the repeated allusions to the Tower of Babel, the story in the Book of Genesis in the Bible that comes to explain...

Latest answer posted November 13, 2011 7:39 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Tartuffe

Moliere's farce, Tartuffe, was twice suppressed by the Catholic Church, but it finally opened to packed houses in 1669 after the playwright revised it three times. The censorship of this play has...

Latest answer posted February 12, 2012 3:28 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Tartuffe

The first version of Tartuffe, by Jean Baptiste Poquelin, better known as Moliere, was performed at the Palace of Versailles in 1664, during the reign of King Louis XIV of France, who promptly...

Latest answer posted June 8, 2019 9:57 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Tartuffe

The romantic subplot of Mariane and Valere in "Tartuffe" contains the traditional difficulties of the father in a patariarchal society who demands that his daughter marry another man, and a lovers'...

Latest answer posted July 8, 2009 12:47 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Tartuffe

Molière's play Tartuffe, or The Impostor, first performed in 1664, is a satire on seventeenth-century Parisian society and religious hypocrisy. The dramatic structure that Molière uses in Tartuffe...

Latest answer posted December 24, 2019 4:52 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Tartuffe

The King appears only towards the end of the play. He is depicted as an all-wise, benevolent monarch who is only interested in dispensing justice. It is the King who is able to save the family from...

Latest answer posted March 7, 2012 11:26 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Tartuffe

Tartuffe is a French word. As both an adjective and noun, it means hypocrite. As for the proper noun usage of the word, Tartuffe refers to the character (by the same name) in Moliere's play...

Latest answer posted August 24, 2013 5:29 pm UTC

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Tartuffe

Tartuffe is the religious hypocrite and crook who deceives Orgon and Orgon's mother, Madame Pernelle, into thinking he is an exceptional, self-sacrificial holy man. He is so successful that Orgon...

Latest answer posted August 6, 2018 10:01 pm UTC

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Tartuffe

Two characters that lend themselves to comparison and contrast are Alceste and Tartuffe. Both are alike in being extreme versions of a personality type. Alceste is an overly honest misanthrope...

Latest answer posted March 19, 2021 5:27 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Tartuffe

Tartuffe, by Jean Baptiste Poquelin, better known as "Moliere," was banned from public performance by King Louis XIV of France in 1664 on religious grounds, banned again in a second version in 1667...

Latest answer posted June 23, 2019 12:01 am UTC

2 educator answers

Tartuffe

In both plays, the asides allow characters to reveal their true feelings to the audience. In Tartuffe, some of the asides come from Dorine, who is a sharp commentator on the weaknesses of her...

Latest answer posted March 15, 2021 9:16 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Tartuffe

In Moliere's Tartuffe, or The Impostor, Tartuffe is a professional in a world of amateurs. He's a professional conman, a hypocrite, and a high-functioning, psychologically astute sociopath. These...

Latest answer posted November 13, 2019 5:22 pm UTC

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Tartuffe

The vast discrepancy between words and deeds is obvious throughout the play. As Cleante puts it, “truly pious people… are not the ones who make the biggest show.” Tartuffe—who does make a big...

Latest answer posted December 22, 2019 1:43 am UTC

3 educator answers

Tartuffe

Comedy tends to rely on contrast. What makes something funny is the disconnect between the environment and the actions of the people in that environment. For instance, in the 2011 comedy...

Latest answer posted March 15, 2021 5:31 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Tartuffe

There is a definite sense that in both of these plays, the audience recognise a dangerous propensity in themselves to fall victim to precisely the same kind of faults that Orgon and Alceste give...

Latest answer posted March 24, 2013 12:56 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Tartuffe

Although he was always careful not to attack anything related to the monarchy since Louis XIV patronized him, Moliere's play Tartuffe, ou L'Imposteur certainly ridicules the ruling classes and...

Latest answer posted October 3, 2012 5:24 am UTC

1 educator answer

Tartuffe

There's precious little evidence to suggest that Tartuffe has changed by the end of the play. Indeed, if anything, he's become even more devious and hypocritical. In the penultimate scene, he...

Latest answer posted June 12, 2018 10:52 am UTC

1 educator answer

Tartuffe

The play Tartuffe is also known as Tartuffe or The Imposter, and at other times, Tartuffe or The Hypocrite. For this reason, at the outset, the audience should understand that Tartuffe is not the...

Latest answer posted September 23, 2018 12:17 am UTC

3 educator answers

Tartuffe

In Moliere's Tartuffe, certain characters contribute more to the author's comic points than others. The characters that stand out for me are Orgon and Tartuffe. Orgon is an idiot. He too easily...

Latest answer posted May 9, 2012 6:12 am UTC

1 educator answer

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