The Tables Turned Questions and Answers

The Tables Turned

As an arch-Romantic, Wordsworth doesn't just see the natural world as a place full of pretty objects such as beautiful trees, majestic mountains, and gorgeous flowers. He sees it, in a somewhat...

Latest answer posted May 17, 2021, 9:16 am (UTC)

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The Tables Turned

The speaker reacts against the dominance of science in the poem "The Tables Turned" by William Wordsworth by saying that people must get out from behind textbooks and experience the environment...

Latest answer posted March 31, 2016, 3:55 pm (UTC)

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The Tables Turned

The first line introduces the literary device of apostrophe, or addressing an absent person or object. In this case, the poem is a one-sided conversation with a friend in which the speaker urges...

Latest answer posted August 7, 2021, 2:51 pm (UTC)

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The Tables Turned

The speaker wants his friend to stop reading his books and head out into nature. This isn't so much because he wants him to take time out to smell the roses, as it were; it's more that he thinks...

Latest answer posted July 31, 2020, 12:54 pm (UTC)

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The Tables Turned

In the poem "The Tables Turned," the author presents a "carpe diem" message about the importance of getting out and enjoying life to the fullest. Specifically, the author encourages people to...

Latest answer posted April 19, 2012, 7:22 pm (UTC)

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The Tables Turned

There are several Romantic elements in Wordsworth's poem. The opening lines of the poem stresses the idea that individuals should abandon formalized study which seeks to eliminate emotional...

Latest answer posted November 11, 2009, 9:07 am (UTC)

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The Tables Turned

In his poem "The Tables Turned," Wordsworth encourages the readers to leave their desks and their books behind and to instead go outside and appreciate the wonders of the natural world. In the...

Latest answer posted March 19, 2021, 11:06 am (UTC)

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The Tables Turned

This particular poem discusses Wordsworth's belief that true understanding and knowledge does not exist in the cloistered worlds of academic learning and and books. Rather, if one is searching for...

Latest answer posted June 29, 2009, 10:03 pm (UTC)

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The Tables Turned

In this poem, the enthusiastic speaker extols the virtues of nature's ability to educate humankind, and he implores his friend -- this friend might even be the reader him or herself! -- to put down...

Latest answer posted September 3, 2019, 11:03 am (UTC)

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The Tables Turned

While the speaker does not state specifically who he is addressing, it appears to be a student. The speaker begins the poem by saying to him, Up! up! my Friend, and quit your books. Addressing...

Latest answer posted July 3, 2021, 11:53 pm (UTC)

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The Tables Turned

The main character of this poem is the speaker himself, who could very well be the poet, William Wordsworth. The speaker is enthusiastic about nature and all nature has to offer and teach people;...

Latest answer posted September 3, 2019, 11:23 am (UTC)

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The Tables Turned

William Wordsworth was an English Romantic poet. Romantic poets often wrote about and celebrated the natural world, which they thought of as beautiful and beyond compare. Romantic poets also often...

Latest answer posted July 6, 2019, 10:22 am (UTC)

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The Tables Turned

An analysis of a text's title can lead to illuminating interpretations and ideas. This poem's title—"The Tables Turned"—is a phrase that does not appear in the body of the poem at all. The...

Latest answer posted September 3, 2019, 11:13 am (UTC)

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The Tables Turned

Wordsworth's poems teach us that observing and appreciating nature can bring us closer to God and give us joy. Through interacting with nature, we can also build up a store of memories that sustain...

Latest answer posted September 13, 2021, 3:21 am (UTC)

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The Tables Turned

Before we begin to study the stanzas, let's recall some brief tenets of Romanticism and Wordsworth's affection for the movement. Romantic (capital "R") poets were determined to free...

Latest answer posted October 22, 2008, 12:49 am (UTC)

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The Tables Turned

In William Wordsworth's "The Tables Turned," Nature is portrayed as an entity in its own right. It is not merely a background to humanity, but rather a teacher of humanity. As the poem begins, the...

Latest answer posted June 21, 2021, 3:35 pm (UTC)

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The Tables Turned

The narrator of the poem is telling his friend to stop reading books; he'll become fat. The speaker then asks why he chooses to be so serious while outside there is a beautiful evening scene: “Up!...

Latest answer posted October 16, 2008, 1:03 pm (UTC)

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The Tables Turned

Part of the driving force of Romanticism was the belief that the deification of subjectivity and emotion can be more powerful than that of science and rational thought. The opening stanza sets up...

Latest answer posted October 16, 2009, 10:33 am (UTC)

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