Symposium Questions and Answers

Symposium

In his speech, Aristophanes tells the story of how Zeus split people long ago. He says that humans used to have four of each limb, instead of two, and that there were three genders. The gods felt...

Latest answer posted June 7, 2020, 12:27 am (UTC)

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Symposium

According to Diotima, spirits mediate between the mortal and the immortal. The gods, who are immortal, never speak directly to mortal humans. Humans pray through spirits, and gods send their...

Latest answer posted August 31, 2020, 10:33 pm (UTC)

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Symposium

In Plato's Symposium, eros occupies the lowest rung on the so-called ladder of love. It is the love for something one doesn't have—a love that manifests itself in a desire for another person's...

Latest answer posted October 17, 2019, 2:41 pm (UTC)

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Symposium

Without a doubt, there’s a big difference between eros and philia as defined in Plato’s symposium. Both words could be translated as “love,” but they describe different aspects of love. The ancient...

Latest answer posted November 19, 2019, 3:36 am (UTC)

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Symposium

Socrates agrees with Diotima that it’s human nature to express love through childbirth and art. In Plato’s Symposium, Socrates and Diotima debate love. The two discuss the acquisition of beautiful...

Latest answer posted September 5, 2021, 5:25 pm (UTC)

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Symposium

Diotima's speech on the ladder of love posits a way of progressing from love of physical beauty, which does not bring happiness, to love of the Form of Beauty, which does. The ladder begins with...

Latest answer posted October 20, 2021, 9:45 am (UTC)

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Symposium

In Plato's Symposium, Socrates recounts the lessons he learned about love and beauty from Diotima of Mantinea. Diotima claimed that it was nobler to give birth through the soul than through the...

Latest answer posted September 1, 2020, 8:33 am (UTC)

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Symposium

History records that Plato first met Socrates around 490 BC and from this meeting he began to develop his overall philosophy, which continued to evolve throughout his lifetime. Many of his beliefs...

Latest answer posted April 4, 2020, 5:17 pm (UTC)

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Symposium

Before discussing how Alcibiades experiences love in a way that counters Socrates’s idea of love, perhaps it’d be best to clarify what Socrates thinks of love. In Symposium, Socrates’s concept of...

Latest answer posted January 18, 2021, 6:30 pm (UTC)

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Symposium

Plato's Symposium is a dialogue that uses a comic setting of a dinner party to introduce a serious discussion of the question of love. It first should be noted that the prototypical model of love...

Latest answer posted August 3, 2011, 2:49 pm (UTC)

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Symposium

The answer to this question is primarily going to be shaped by your own evaluation of the various speeches in Symposium. Indeed, even before beginning to answer this question, you must first ask:...

Latest answer posted July 24, 2021, 7:05 pm (UTC)

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Symposium

In English we have only one word for love, but the ancient Greeks had several, all of which are critically discussed in Plato's Symposium. One kind of love for the Greeks was eros, which is erotic...

Latest answer posted November 21, 2019, 3:26 pm (UTC)

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Symposium

The "Introduction" to Plato's Symposium discusses the ideologies Phaedrus, Pausanias, Eryximachus, Aristophanes, Alcibiades, and Socrates regarding their personal understandings and beliefs about...

Latest answer posted November 19, 2019, 1:28 am (UTC)

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Symposium

In Plato's Symposium, a dialogue staged as a hybrid bacchanal/speaking contest, the speakers focus on the god of love, Eros, and the power of beauty as the object of human desire. Among the...

Latest answer posted November 22, 2019, 7:48 am (UTC)

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