A Streetcar Named Desire Questions and Answers

A Streetcar Named Desire

In order to determine whether the character of Blanche Dubois is rendered as a parody of the Southern Belle, the first thing to analyze is whether Tennessee Williams intended to use her character...

Latest answer posted March 31, 2013, 7:37 pm (UTC)

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A Streetcar Named Desire

Blanche would embody the idea of futility in seeking to change the deeply held opinions of others. She is unable to convince her sister to leave Stanley. She is unable to arouse the sense of...

Latest answer posted September 9, 2012, 12:34 am (UTC)

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A Streetcar Named Desire

In so many ways, the characters in Williams' work battle for their own vision of reality to be appropriated by another towards whom they have feelings. Blanche desperately seeks this out of...

Latest answer posted September 9, 2012, 12:23 am (UTC)

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A Streetcar Named Desire

Concerning A Streetcar Named Desire, the answer to your question depends on whether you're referring to the plot and the fates of the characters, or to the play as a work of art. You might see the...

Latest answer posted February 13, 2011, 2:50 am (UTC)

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A Streetcar Named Desire

In terms of construction of a thesis statement about truth, more information would be needed. Seeing that Blanche is included in the tags, perhaps there might be something to be said about...

Latest answer posted November 14, 2010, 7:03 pm (UTC)

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A Streetcar Named Desire

Tennessee Williams is renowned as a playwright. Not only was he known for his plays (such as A Streetcar Named Desire and Cat on a Hot Tin Roof), he wrote two novels and multiple short stories and...

Latest answer posted July 8, 2013, 8:11 pm (UTC)

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A Streetcar Named Desire

The color white is significant in that it is an allegory to Blanche's "clean slate". It is ironic, because Blanche had come to her sister's to possibly start over after leaving a life in shambles...

Latest answer posted August 7, 2010, 11:50 pm (UTC)

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A Streetcar Named Desire

Hi! Without a doubt Blanche must be held responsible for how she led her life, yet, her ultimate tragedy of being raped and sent to the sanatorium was not her fault. The part of which she should be...

Latest answer posted February 15, 2010, 3:29 am (UTC)

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A Streetcar Named Desire

I think that Williams is quite deliberate in concluding the play in a manner where there are no "winners." Blanche's institutionalization is not done for her own welfare, but to consolidate...

Latest answer posted March 1, 2011, 9:18 pm (UTC)

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A Streetcar Named Desire

I think that the video clip really speaks to how Stanley's animalistic approach would not be tolerated in the modern setting. Stanley is able to use his power, his sense of machismo, as a way to...

Latest answer posted August 22, 2012, 9:21 am (UTC)

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A Streetcar Named Desire

There are many ways that a writer can approach the character of Blanche DuBois in Tennessee Williams’s play. Her character is both an individual who has distinctive elements and changes over the...

Latest answer posted November 22, 2019, 10:31 pm (UTC)

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A Streetcar Named Desire

Probably the title says it all in this play. Williams focuses on the power of "desire," not only in a sexual sense, but as a ruling force by which the behavior of people is governed—often, if not...

Latest answer posted June 2, 2019, 6:18 pm (UTC)

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A Streetcar Named Desire

A Streetcar Named Desire is one of the most important plays in American history. Today, the play has significance in many ways. The first of these is that it defined an important genre in American...

Latest answer posted May 10, 2016, 10:36 pm (UTC)

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A Streetcar Named Desire

It's hard to say if Tennessee Williams was making any sort of conclusive statement about anything in "A Streetcar Named Desire"; the play ends with everything in a big mess and no-one getting what...

Latest answer posted January 29, 2010, 3:15 am (UTC)

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A Streetcar Named Desire

The crucial revelation in the play, made by Blanche to Mitch, is that Blanche had been married to a gay man. Blanche recounts her having told her husband, after discovering him together with...

Latest answer posted May 24, 2018, 1:45 am (UTC)

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A Streetcar Named Desire

In A Streetcar Named Desire, Tennessee Williams juxtaposes concepts of reality and illusion. The main character, Blanche DuBois, comes to stay at her sister’s house to escape her former life and...

Latest answer posted November 30, 2019, 12:59 am (UTC)

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A Streetcar Named Desire

The biggest desire in the play is Blanche's. She desires more than anything else to be accepted, find a place in the world, be loved, be cherished, and be cared for. Yet she is destined never to...

Latest answer posted March 15, 2018, 2:52 pm (UTC)

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A Streetcar Named Desire

Some questions you could consider investigating would be: do the characters grow at all from the beginning of the play to the end? Is what happens between Blanche and Stanley inevitably surprising...

Latest answer posted February 10, 2011, 10:05 pm (UTC)

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A Streetcar Named Desire

Naturalism is a literary movement which focuses on very specific aspects of life. The characteristics of Naturalistic texts contain the following ideals: 1. The text is written from an objective...

Latest answer posted July 20, 2011, 7:52 am (UTC)

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A Streetcar Named Desire

To develop a thesis for your essay, an important first step is deciding what you think the author’s intentions are in the play. Blanche DuBois is the main character, and she undergoes some major...

Latest answer posted November 21, 2019, 5:15 am (UTC)

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A Streetcar Named Desire

I tend to think that the historical context of 1947 America is highly significant to the drama. It becomes clear from an early point that Williams is writing about the collision of worlds between...

Latest answer posted September 16, 2012, 12:59 am (UTC)

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A Streetcar Named Desire

It is very important that you understand that this work is a play, a drama--not a novel. A good thesis would be "how does Tennessee Williams fulfill an American version of a tragedy as opposed to...

Latest answer posted December 2, 2009, 6:57 am (UTC)

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A Streetcar Named Desire

In the opening scenes of A Streetcar Named Desire, the setting and characters are portrayed as realistic. At the beginning of the play, Blanche arrives to visit her sister Stella and her husband...

Latest answer posted August 12, 2010, 2:57 am (UTC)

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A Streetcar Named Desire

The idea that "it is substantial that the people we adore comprehend our reality" would seem to apply more to the character of Stella in Tennessee Williams's A Streetcar Named Desire. This is so...

Latest answer posted September 8, 2012, 5:25 pm (UTC)

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A Streetcar Named Desire

It should be stated on the outset that it is going to be difficult in finding a flaw in Williams' work. He is a powerfully compelling writer in displaying human conflict and interactions that help...

Latest answer posted August 2, 2011, 2:16 pm (UTC)

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A Streetcar Named Desire

Wow! Great question, and I had to give it 5 stars. Stanley Kowalski is the epitome of misogynism and chauvinism. He treats and sees women as objects of sex and instant gratification, and he takes...

Latest answer posted May 3, 2010, 9:45 am (UTC)

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A Streetcar Named Desire

In addition to the themes of fantasy vs. reality, the destruction of the Old South, and the conflict between old and new in general (along with other themes discussed in the other answers to this...

Latest answer posted May 26, 2019, 11:15 pm (UTC)

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A Streetcar Named Desire

You might like to consider the way that the past intrudes on the present in this excellent play, in particular concerning Blanche's former husband and how he met his end. The device that Williams...

Latest answer posted September 25, 2011, 6:45 pm (UTC)

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A Streetcar Named Desire

I think that one can describe the role of women in Williams' work as complex. Tennessee Williams is such a challenging writer because he did not reduce human beings to simplistic, monochromatic...

Latest answer posted July 17, 2011, 2:19 am (UTC)

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A Streetcar Named Desire

You are perfectly correct in thinking that violence and softness, or violence versus softness, are important to Tennessee Williams' A Streetcar Named Desire. The primary conflict is between Blanche...

Latest answer posted January 8, 2016, 7:06 pm (UTC)

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A Streetcar Named Desire

There are a number of different ways that this question can be approached. I suppose the most obvious one would be to analyse this play as a comment on the roles of women in the society of the time...

Latest answer posted January 17, 2012, 3:53 am (UTC)

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A Streetcar Named Desire

A Streetcar Named Desire is a play written by American playwright Tennessee Williams. It tells the story of Blanche DuBois, a Southern woman in her thirties who leaves her hometown of Laurel,...

Latest answer posted September 22, 2020, 2:53 pm (UTC)

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A Streetcar Named Desire

Blanche Dubois is a New Orleans native, and member of a formerly well-to-do family who has now lost both its money and its prestige. This has not deterred Blanche from desperately trying to cling...

Latest answer posted January 13, 2010, 2:25 am (UTC)

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A Streetcar Named Desire

A key aspect of Blanche's character is her revlusion of death and what she does to avoid thinking about it and to try and combat it. A much neglected section of the play is when, in Scene 8, a...

Latest answer posted November 17, 2013, 6:07 am (UTC)

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A Streetcar Named Desire

Blanche Dubois in Williams' A Streetcar Named Desire could be called "The Queen of Denial," as you suggest, but the label probably doesn't do her justice and is probably like most labels:...

Latest answer posted June 26, 2010, 7:22 am (UTC)

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A Streetcar Named Desire

Blanche proves that "it's not just a river in Egypt." She does live in a state of denial about many things. The first and most pressing level of disconnect in her own consciousness is that she is...

Latest answer posted July 21, 2010, 2:14 pm (UTC)

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A Streetcar Named Desire

In scene 3, we're explicitly told that Blanche turns the radio to a station playing "Wien, Wien, nur du allein." This was a popular song in Europe, and means "Vienna, Vienna, you...

Latest answer posted January 4, 2008, 3:40 am (UTC)

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A Streetcar Named Desire

I think that there could be many different ways to read Foucault's notion of power in both of Williams' work. In the case of Blanche, Stanley uses the notion of insanity and mental illness to...

Latest answer posted October 23, 2010, 2:26 am (UTC)

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A Streetcar Named Desire

The concept of the Elysian fields as a final moratorium for the virtuous and the heroic is not proportional to the stories of the the characters of Tennessee Williams's play A Streetcar Named...

Latest answer posted December 12, 2011, 5:19 am (UTC)

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