Strange Meeting Questions and Answers

Strange Meeting

In this poem, the speaker wakes up and realizes he has died and gone to hell. The first sense in which war is depicted as tragic is through the speaker's sense that after warfare, hell is not so...

Latest answer posted August 4, 2020, 11:38 am (UTC)

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Strange Meeting

The meeting is “strange” because the person the poet meets is his enemy (“I am the enemy you killed, my friend…”). But that is not the only “strange” thing about this meeting. First, it takes place...

Latest answer posted October 2, 2016, 9:25 pm (UTC)

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Strange Meeting

"Strange Meeting" is one of Wilfred Owen's poems that illustrates the horror and futility of war. Owen fought in World War I and he quickly became horrified by the grim realities of war. In this...

Latest answer posted March 22, 2013, 5:17 pm (UTC)

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Strange Meeting

In his poem “Strange Meeting,” Wilfred Owen uses a variety of poetic devices and techniques. These include the overall narrative strategy, which employs a first-person narrator or speaker but also...

Latest answer posted July 17, 2021, 6:04 am (UTC)

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Strange Meeting

Owen was a serving soldier at the Front for several years during the First World War. His poem is set in one of many tunnels through which soldiers traveled on a daily basis—compare Siegfried...

Latest answer posted May 3, 2018, 7:17 pm (UTC)

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Strange Meeting

The first speaker in Wilfred Owen's poem "Strange Meeting" finds himself escaping from battle down "some profound dull tunnel" (line 2). He does not realize at first that he is dead, but he sees...

Latest answer posted August 7, 2020, 2:51 pm (UTC)

3 educator answers

Strange Meeting

You are of course refering to the final words of this powerful poem, where the alter-ego of the speaker of the poem says to the speaker that they are able to "sleep" together now after identifying...

Latest answer posted October 26, 2011, 7:50 pm (UTC)

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Strange Meeting

In "Strange Meeting," Owen very much wants to show that the soldiers fighting on the German side are really no different to those who, like himself, are fighting for the British Army—indeed, they...

Latest answer posted May 20, 2019, 9:11 am (UTC)

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Strange Meeting

You haven't specified which poems exactly you are asking about, but there are certainly many poems by both Owen and Sassoon which you could explore as examples of writing on "the pity of war." In...

Latest answer posted January 21, 2021, 9:17 am (UTC)

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Strange Meeting

Wilfred Owen wrote anti-war poems based on his horrible experiences in the trenches in World War I. In this fanciful poem, the narrator, a soldier, meets the ghost of another solider. The narrator...

Latest answer posted July 19, 2018, 7:49 pm (UTC)

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Strange Meeting

At the very beginning of Wilfred Owen's poem, "Strange Meeting," the speaker describes how he has escaped from battle into a "profound dull tunnel" which has been scooped out of the earth as a...

Latest answer posted March 1, 2021, 11:00 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Strange Meeting

Thank you for introducing me to this powerful poem. Wilfred Owen was one of the most important poets to write about World War I. "Strange Meeting," like many of his poems, expresses a very...

Latest answer posted May 15, 2010, 11:53 am (UTC)

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Strange Meeting

In his poem titled “Strange Meeting,” Wilfred Owen depicts a war-time encounter, in hell, between a soldier who has been slain and the enemy soldier who has slain him. The speaker of the poem is...

Latest answer posted February 9, 2012, 6:56 am (UTC)

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Strange Meeting

The Poem’ Strange Meeting’ is written as an elegy: traditionally a form used to lament or mourn the dead. Owen is mourning the death of the narrator, curiously a poet who we take to be Owen...

Latest answer posted November 25, 2010, 12:46 pm (UTC)

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Strange Meeting

In this poem, a soldier, the poem's speaker, finds himself in a "tunnel" where men groan in sleep. While there, the speaker meets another soldier he recognizes. The speaker says that from the other...

Latest answer posted August 19, 2021, 11:59 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Strange Meeting

You might like to consider the impact that the strange alter-ego that the speaker finds in the tunnel that he goes into has upon the speaker and in particular the comments that he makes about the...

Latest answer posted August 28, 2011, 9:37 pm (UTC)

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Strange Meeting

This is a broad question, and the poem gives you a lot of scope for argument. If we consider first what you are being asked to do here, this might give an indication of what the options are. The...

Latest answer posted July 25, 2018, 7:45 am (UTC)

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Strange Meeting

In an essay published in 1985, Edwina Burness argued that Wilfred Owen’s poem “Strange Meeting” was a significant influence on a poem by Robert Service titled “Bonehead Bill.” She noted that both...

Latest answer posted February 12, 2012, 7:56 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Strange Meeting

I am afraid not. Heroic couplets are a pair of rhyming iambic pentameters. Thus the rhyming is something that is a basic constituent part of heroic couplets. "Strange Meeting" is therefore a poem...

Latest answer posted February 10, 2012, 2:28 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Strange Meeting

In Owen's poem, form does relate to content. Language choices reflect the hard, harsh content discussing Hell: "I knew that sullen hall, / ... I knew we stood in Hell." This connection between...

Latest answer posted June 9, 2011, 4:31 pm (UTC)

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Strange Meeting

Yet also there encumbered sleepers groaned, Too fast in thought or death to be bestirred. Then, as I probed them, one sprang up, and stared With piteous recognition in fixed eyes, Lifting...

Latest answer posted January 10, 2019, 7:07 pm (UTC)

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