The Storm Questions and Answers

The Storm

I believe the ending is ironic, but more because the characters are mistaken in their happiness due to their ignorance of other events. At the end of the story, the storm did indeed pass, and...

Latest answer posted July 14, 2019 2:33 pm UTC

2 educator answers

The Storm

In "The Storm," Kate Chopin implies that sexual fulfillment—even outside marriage—is positive and can improve the strength and happiness of a relationship between two people. Chopin doesn't appear...

Latest answer posted November 9, 2017 2:53 pm UTC

2 educator answers

The Storm

Kate Chopin’s celebration of the alleged joys of adultery must have been pretty shocking to a contemporary audience. Actually, it’s still pretty shocking today, as we are now more clued-in than...

Latest answer posted July 17, 2020 10:36 am UTC

4 educator answers

The Storm

"The Storm" speaks to the belief that surrendering to passion need not have disastrous consequences, despite what conventional morality suggests. The tryst that Calixta and Alce indulge in is...

Latest answer posted February 11, 2017 1:40 pm UTC

2 educator answers

The Storm

A major theme in much of Kate Chopin's writing is that of women feeling unhappy and repressed in marriage. So, Calixta's tryst with Alcee represented Calixta taking control of her happiness,...

Latest answer posted July 21, 2009 12:51 pm UTC

1 educator answer

The Storm

The setting, especially the storm itself, is symbolic. Everything seems calm, knowable, before the storm, but then as the storm develops and grows more intense, so do the feelings of Calixta and...

Latest answer posted February 14, 2018 12:59 pm UTC

3 educator answers

The Storm

In Kate Chopin's 1898 short story, The Storm, it's the little things that show how much Bobinôt loves his wife, Calixta. Bobinôt arose and going across to the counter purchased a can of shrimps,...

Latest answer posted September 13, 2019 1:43 pm UTC

3 educator answers

The Storm

I agree with copelmat that the final line of the story would make an excellent title. That final line is extremely ambiguous and perhaps even ironic, and so that title would give you the chance to...

Latest answer posted July 7, 2011 9:32 am UTC

3 educator answers

The Storm

When we talk about the "tone" of a story, we are discussing the attitude taken by the narrator towards the subject, themes, and characters. It's the impression we get about the characters based...

Latest answer posted February 25, 2019 9:30 am UTC

2 educator answers

The Storm

There are symbols both prominent and small in Chopin's "The Storm." A small yet interesting symbol in this story is the can of shrimps Bobinot purchases for Calixta. The can of shrimps is a small...

Latest answer posted October 24, 2017 1:56 am UTC

2 educator answers

The Storm

In this "Sequel to the 'Cadian Ball," as the subtitle to Kate Chopin's story reads, the storm that "burst" is used in a metaphoric sense as well as a realistic one. The metaphor of the storm...

Latest answer posted July 16, 2017 11:06 pm UTC

2 educator answers

The Storm

The storm provides the reason for Bobinôt's not returning home, just as it allows for Alcée's stopping for shelter. In its charged energy, the storm also acts as a catalyst for the maelstrom of...

Latest answer posted October 15, 2017 11:59 pm UTC

2 educator answers

The Storm

It is of note that Kate Chopin's "The Storm" is a sequel to "The 'Cadian Ball" because the storm becomes a metaphor for the unleashed passions of Alcée and Calixta aroused in the previous story....

Latest answer posted December 4, 2013 6:47 am UTC

1 educator answer

The Storm

Kate Chopin uses colloquial speech to aid in the characterization of Bobinôt and Bibi, seen in Bibi's response to his father's suggestion that Calixta had Sylvie helping her: "No; she ent got...

Latest answer posted November 1, 2017 9:51 pm UTC

1 educator answer

The Storm

In Kate Chopin’s short story “The Storm,” the love of Bobinôt for his wife Calixta is suggested in a variety of ways, including the following: As the storm approaches, Bobinôt and his young son...

Latest answer posted February 26, 2012 1:33 pm UTC

1 educator answer

The Storm

A bolt of lightning strikes a tree in Calixta's yard, and its "blinding glare and the crash seemed to invade the very boards [Calixta and Alcée] stood upon." It is this flash of white light that...

Latest answer posted February 5, 2018 12:48 am UTC

3 educator answers

The Storm

In "The Storm," the storm itself could be interpreted as a character if the reader personifies the storm as such. In this interpretation, the personified storm comments on, or supplements, the...

Latest answer posted September 20, 2012 5:53 pm UTC

1 educator answer

The Storm

The storm functions as an excuse for husbands and wives to be separated. The storm also can be considered symbolic of pent-up desire and the natural power of Calixta’s long suppressed yearning for...

Latest answer posted September 27, 2018 11:54 am UTC

3 educator answers

The Storm

With "At the 'Cadian Ball" considered as a prequel to "The Storm," the relationships among the characters certainly assumes greater meaning. Alcee Laballiere is a Creole planter whose rice crop is...

Latest answer posted June 19, 2012 4:20 am UTC

2 educator answers

The Storm

The plot of a story is comprised of its main events. It refers, essentially, to what happens and the order in which the events take place. In order to give Calixta and Alcee Laballiere the chance...

Latest answer posted November 25, 2019 2:15 pm UTC

3 educator answers

The Storm

Clearly the title of this excellent story relates to both a literal storm and a figurative storm that rages during the course of this story. The two of course are very closely interlinked, and...

Latest answer posted July 29, 2011 7:45 pm UTC

1 educator answer

The Storm

The reader is immediately drawn into The Storm by Kate Chopin, even before it starts. The title introduces the reader to the metaphorical, symbolic storm that will follow. A storm is a...

Latest answer posted November 18, 2013 5:31 am UTC

1 educator answer

The Storm

The setting of “The Storm” by Kate Chopin plays a central role in the story in much the way a character would. The story, which was written in 1898, takes place in a small, southern Louisiana town....

Latest answer posted April 22, 2016 8:35 pm UTC

1 educator answer

The Storm

In addition to the relevance of the title "The Storm" above, this title also symbolizes the tumultuous nature of marriage and physical attraction to others during marriage. We are human...

Latest answer posted August 31, 2008 12:01 pm UTC

2 educator answers

The Storm

Kate Chopin makes use of symbols of fecundity early in the story; the imagery of the farm's "furrows," the chickens, the "plows and a harrow," and of course the "big drops of rain" all suggest...

Latest answer posted March 3, 2020 2:08 pm UTC

3 educator answers

The Storm

As far as the plot is concerned, the introduction of the treacherous storm in Part I explains why Bobinot and Bibi are marooned at Friedheimer's store for the afternoon. This stay keeps them away...

Latest answer posted April 15, 2016 9:41 pm UTC

3 educator answers

The Storm

”The Storm” by Kate Chopin takes place in southern Louisiana. It is possible to tell the setting based on the hints in the story. There is a story that is a prequel to this story: "At the Cadian...

Latest answer posted July 27, 2013 1:34 am UTC

1 educator answer

The Storm

Then he returned to his perch on the keg and sat stolidly holding the can of shrimps while the storm burst. It shook the wooden store and seemed to be ripping great furrows in the distant field....

Latest answer posted August 2, 2019 1:11 pm UTC

1 educator answer

The Storm

An extramarital affair, lust, lies--This story "The Storm" by Kate Chopin was not published in her life time because it was considered too risqué. Written in 1898, it was not published until 1969....

Latest answer posted January 11, 2013 2:09 am UTC

1 educator answer

The Storm

Chopin uses the storm as a foreshadowing of the coming stormy affair between Alcee and Calixta, and also, a symbol of Calixta's underlying unhappiness in her marriage. There is not much else to...

Latest answer posted July 22, 2009 12:40 am UTC

1 educator answer

The Storm

Chopin certainly puts the ingredients together for adultery to take place in "The Storm," but the foreshadowing is very subtle, so it definitely sets the reader up to be surprised by Calixta and...

Latest answer posted June 2, 2019 2:24 am UTC

2 educator answers

The Storm

You are right in identifying that "the storm" of passion that overcame Alcee and Calixta, both metaphorically and literally, has had a positive effect on all concerned. To see how this effect has...

Latest answer posted April 14, 2011 8:12 pm UTC

1 educator answer

The Storm

I agree with you that the tone of Chopin's "The Storm" is sympathetic. One place to find evidence to support your conclusion about tone is in the description. A speaker's description of...

Latest answer posted April 26, 2010 10:46 am UTC

1 educator answer

The Storm

In "The Storm," we see a woman who acts against all conventional boundaries associated with marriage, and breaks her marital vows in order to grasp what she feels is a moment of happiness for...

Latest answer posted October 15, 2009 10:50 am UTC

1 educator answer

The Storm

The narrator is an unnamed, third-person narrator. This narrator "matter-of-factly" relays the events of the story without passing judgment on any of the characters; therefore, the...

Latest answer posted September 16, 2008 2:44 am UTC

1 educator answer

The Storm

In Kate Chopin's short story, the storm itself only influences the characters' physical convergence, because Alcée has to find refuge inside Calixta's home as the storm approaches. Initially, Alcée...

Latest answer posted October 2, 2018 6:53 am UTC

1 educator answer

The Storm

Calixta has an illicit sexual affair with Alcee Labelliere because of the sexual tension and passion that seem to overwhelm her desire to be faithful to her husband. Just as the storm outside is...

Latest answer posted June 17, 2020 9:29 pm UTC

1 educator answer

The Storm

Kate Chopin's short story 'The Storm', although first written in 1898, was not published until 1969. There is a simple reason for this. Although tame by today's standards, the story's depiction of...

Latest answer posted November 24, 2013 9:37 pm UTC

1 educator answer

The Storm

Bobinot purchases the “can of shrimps” in part one of the story. Readers are not told much about the purchase other than the fact that Calixta is “very fond” of shrimp. Bobinot is unable to...

Latest answer posted March 4, 2017 2:55 pm UTC

2 educator answers

The Storm

The line comes from Chopin's short story, "The Storm." Naturally, there is much in way of passion and intensity contained in the line. The idea of the woman's passion being in "generous...

Latest answer posted July 28, 2010 5:54 pm UTC

1 educator answer

The Storm

In a sense the powerful thunderstorm of the narrative of Kate Chopin's story acts as character, an elemental force that exercises its power upon their emotions. Indeed, the storm is the embodiment...

Latest answer posted June 2, 2014 2:03 am UTC

1 educator answer

The Storm

The title of Kate Chopin’s short story “The Storm” functions as a symbol that comments on the theme of female sexuality. In the story, female sexuality is recognized as both a choice and an...

Latest answer posted October 31, 2017 9:25 pm UTC

1 educator answer

The Storm

In "The Storm", “Local Color” refers to the specific details of the story that might help the reader develop a better sense of the setting. Because we know that this short story takes place in...

Latest answer posted March 16, 2020 12:14 am UTC

4 educator answers

The Storm

Kate Chopin uses the construct of a storm as an extended metaphor to define gender roles in her short story "The Storm." The storm in this story is a violent torrent of wind and rain, unleashed by...

Latest answer posted June 21, 2012 3:21 am UTC

1 educator answer

The Storm

To add to the previous answer, Chopin also held the belief that there was a huge difference between sexual love for a single person and sexual love in a marriage. She questioned if there could...

Latest answer posted September 14, 2008 1:25 am UTC

2 educator answers

The Storm

This paragraph explains, in a rather straightforward way, Calixta's appearance as Alcee grabs a hold of her at her house during the storm. It is filled with imagery and vivid descriptions, written...

Latest answer posted October 15, 2009 10:58 am UTC

1 educator answer

The Storm

You might find it more interesting to ask what Chopin's views on marriage were based on this excellent short story. Clearly what is notable about this text is the way that Chopin presents sex...

Latest answer posted March 14, 2011 3:42 am UTC

1 educator answer

The Storm

In Kate Chopin's "The Storm," we are not meant to look at Calixta as a victim of Alcee's amorous attentions. They are both consenting adults who give in to their passions in the heat of a quite...

Latest answer posted March 8, 2012 5:33 am UTC

1 educator answer

The Storm

Another possible storm could be one of the ultimate meanings that Kate Chopin wanted readers to get out of this story...the difference between sex within a marriage and sex outside of a marriage....

Latest answer posted October 20, 2008 9:50 am UTC

2 educator answers

The Storm

Well, if you need help in identifying differences between the two characters, clearly a major difference between Calixta and Desiree is the way that Desiree is faithful to her husband and Calixta...

Latest answer posted February 13, 2011 7:23 pm UTC

1 educator answer

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