Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening Questions and Answers

Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

To understand what the speaker's "promises" symbolize in "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening," it is important to understand what the poem is about. The speaker has chosen to stop for a moment in...

Latest answer posted September 7, 2020, 11:20 am (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

These three poems are not directly connected. "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening" and "The Road Not Taken" are single poems, while "The Pasture" is part of a larger work and is more meaningful...

Latest answer posted September 11, 2012, 9:18 pm (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

"Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening," is one of Robert Frost's best known and best loved short poems. The simple narrative of a wintertime traveler on horseback who stops for a moment to watch...

Latest answer posted April 14, 2010, 4:29 am (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

This is a richly symbolic poem where things work on two levels - a literal level and a more symbolic level. This poem is usually used as an example of symbolism to help students explore symbolic...

Latest answer posted October 6, 2010, 8:27 pm (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

In this poem, isolation is something that the writer craves and desires, and attempts to chase and capture for a few brief moments for himself. If you look at the last lines, he ponders how he...

Latest answer posted October 14, 2010, 8:13 am (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

One of the central themes of this poem is that every person is, at some point, torn between what they want and what others expect from them. The speaker of the poem is clearly someone with...

Latest answer posted February 11, 2016, 12:42 am (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

In a sense, yes. The poem appears to be so simple, and yet it seems possible to come up with a figurative interpretation because of the final two lines: "And miles to go before I sleep, / And...

Latest answer posted June 16, 2016, 5:44 pm (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

I have always imagined that the speaker of the poem, whom I take to be Robert Frost himself, has driven into a little town for provisions, and possibly for a few Christmas presents, and is on his...

Latest answer posted October 22, 2014, 6:00 am (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

This is a poem with many levels. On the surface, it is basically a simple story about a man and a horse who stop by some woods on an evening when it happens to be snowing. However, the poem’s...

Latest answer posted September 20, 2012, 5:13 pm (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

This poem was included in New Hampshire, published in 1923. Even Frost himself was amazed at the many interpretations of this piece. However, historically, the 1920's was an era of change, a modern...

Latest answer posted June 9, 2008, 2:59 am (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

Your question is really asking about symbolism and how it is used in this great poem. Robert Frost in his poetry is a master of symbolism, and uses every day situations or events to suggest much...

Latest answer posted December 25, 2010, 6:43 pm (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

Robert Frost did not write a poem called "Snowflake." Since you are posting the question under "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening," you evidently meant this poem, which does speak about...

Latest answer posted May 4, 2016, 5:42 pm (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

You might also describe the rhyme scheme as: aaba, bbcb, ccdc, and dddd.

Latest answer posted January 18, 2012, 7:11 am (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

In Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening, the speaker's sense of purpose, direction, and meaning are full of ambiguity. The reader's own appreciation of the ambiguity of life helps the reader to...

Latest answer posted October 14, 2015, 7:59 pm (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

The second stanza of the famous Frost poem published (1923) in New Hampshire contains a highly significant allusion: My little horse must think it queerTo stop without a farmhouse nearBetween the...

Latest answer posted May 6, 2011, 4:56 am (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

Robert Frost wrote this poem in one night and, according to him, it just "came to him" rapidly, hence, this tells you that the poem is meant to be universal and has no definite meaning but the one...

Latest answer posted July 1, 2009, 3:19 am (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

The correct answer is 4) regular rhyme scheme with metrical pattern. The poem contains no unconventional syntax, that is, using words or sentence structure in unusual ways. Nor does it have...

Latest answer posted June 21, 2017, 3:22 am (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

I can see why someone would characterize this poem's tone as serious although "contemplative" might be the word I would choose. The narrator, whom I have always assumed was a man, has paused for a...

Latest answer posted March 4, 2016, 7:17 pm (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

The word "tone" is used in literary terms to describe the attitude of the writer towards his subject or theme—the attitude we, as the reader, detect while reading. Robert Frost himself was rather...

Latest answer posted January 7, 2019, 6:38 am (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

In "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening" by American poet Robert Frost, the importance of using the pronoun "I" is that this gives an intimate, personal touch to the poem. The reader can better...

Latest answer posted April 30, 2015, 6:36 pm (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

To examine the "woods" theme in Robert Frost's poem, it would be useful to first consider that the poet uses them both in the literal sense and metaphorically. To structure a critical analysis,...

Latest answer posted January 6, 2019, 7:59 pm (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

In Robert Frost’s “Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening,” the horse reacts to the driver’s pause in two places: My little horse must think it queer To stop without a farmhouse near (lines...

Latest answer posted September 18, 2016, 10:34 am (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

From a Judeo-Christian religious perspective, God can be said to be the "owner" of the woods to which the poet refers, but Frost explicitly identifies the wood's owner: His house is in the...

Latest answer posted June 27, 2013, 2:33 pm (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

While the familiar rhythm of iambic quatrameter and the simple rhyme scheme of Frost's poem connotes relaxation, the repetition of the last line as the reminder that the poet has obligations,...

Latest answer posted June 16, 2009, 9:30 am (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

To answer this question, the first thing we need to do is identify some themes of Robert Frost's poem “Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening.” Some scholars mention hesitation and choice,...

Latest answer posted December 5, 2020, 1:47 am (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

When the narrator of "Stopping by Wood on a Snowy Evening" pauses on a dark, snowy night to watch the snow fall in the woods, his horse, accustomed to stopping in the town, is confused. "He gives...

Latest answer posted June 25, 2016, 9:38 pm (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

There are at least two interpretations of the horse's purpose in the poem based on readers' differing interpretations of "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening." Some readers find that this is a...

Latest answer posted September 7, 2020, 11:54 am (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

In Robert Frost's "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening," the bells represent time and society's obligatory creations while the wind is representative of Nature. The horse gives "his harness bells...

Latest answer posted June 16, 2009, 2:19 am (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

By “the darkest evening of the year,” it is most likely that the speaker refers to the Winter Solstice, the shortest day of the year on which the evening would begin early. When it is snowing...

Latest answer posted June 3, 2019, 5:57 am (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

The aural elements of a poem are those that have to do with sound, rhyme, and tone. Reading a poem aloud is often useful in recognizing these patterns. In the famous poem "Stopping by Woods on a...

Latest answer posted July 15, 2020, 6:09 pm (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

The speaker of Frost's poem stops by the woods because the snow falling against the dark night sky is so beautiful. The speaker has people to see and places to be, but nevertheless, he is so taken...

Latest answer posted August 30, 2019, 7:39 pm (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

The poem explores the effect of nature's beauty on the human psyche. A one sentence summary might be: A man on horseback stops at the edge of the woods to watch the beauty of falling snow before...

Latest answer posted September 24, 2010, 9:12 am (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

The speaker explains the reason for not being able to remain for long in the woods in the last three lines of the final stanza: The woods are lovely, dark and deep,But I have promises to keep,And...

Latest answer posted November 18, 2015, 5:07 am (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

A symbol is something that has both literal and figurative meaning. In the case of the woods in "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening," this means that the woods are literally present in the poem...

Latest answer posted September 7, 2020, 11:50 am (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

With so much having been written on Frost's wonderful poem, there are many avenues of interpretation which the reader may take. For instance, in The Virginia Quarterly Review, James M. Cox...

Latest answer posted February 28, 2012, 6:34 am (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

The speaker of "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening" does not actually say exactly how far the woods are from the owner's house in the village. We can assume that it is quite some distance,...

Latest answer posted May 27, 2020, 3:11 pm (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

The woods are "lovely," but also "dark and deep." This darkness, which seems to exert a powerful attraction on the poet, takes on a vaguely ominous tone in the light of the final line, "And miles...

Latest answer posted May 26, 2009, 8:12 pm (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

In this poem, a man rides through the woods. It's dark and there is someplace he needs to be. However, he stops for a moment to watch the snow fall. He doesn't tell us why he stops, but we can...

Latest answer posted January 27, 2016, 9:54 pm (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

This question has already been asked and answered here on eNotes. Here is a link for you:...

Latest answer posted July 21, 2011, 12:36 pm (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

The speaker's horse is probably pulling a sleigh and knows a regular route that the owner takes; therefore, when the man stops in a deserted woodland, she gives the sleigh bells a shake in order to...

Latest answer posted September 6, 2015, 8:30 am (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

Robert Frost's poems "The Road Not Taken" and "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening" are classic poems that have been read, re-read, and much loved for generations. Let's reflect on these two poems...

Latest answer posted October 19, 2020, 3:13 pm (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

This Frost poem is four stanzas long, and each stanza is four lines long. That's not a very long poem, and despite the title specifically mentioning them, the woods are not talked about very much....

Latest answer posted June 22, 2018, 3:57 pm (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

There is no personification (personification is giving inanimate objects human attributes; therefore, if we go by this definition (see www.dictionary.com), the horse would not count since it is not...

Latest answer posted May 29, 2008, 11:27 am (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

In "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening," the speaker is riding his horse toward some unnamed destination and is still "miles" away when he decides to stop a moment. There is no sign of...

Latest answer posted July 5, 2019, 12:27 am (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

"Stopping by the Woods on a Snowy Evening" continues a long tradition of nature poems in which a speaker captures a moment of quiet joy. It is short, it uses simple language, and it is lyrical—it...

Latest answer posted July 9, 2019, 11:50 am (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

“Whose woods these are I think I know His house is in the village though; He will not see me stopping here To watch his woods fill up with snow. “ These lines indicate that the narrator of the poem...

Latest answer posted November 10, 2008, 11:04 pm (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

The speakers in both poems are nameless men. The speaker in "Woods" might be richer than the other since he is driving a horse while the other man is a farm laborer. But that's not for sure. The...

Latest answer posted March 10, 2010, 2:15 pm (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

The following is quoted from "Critical Essays" in the eNotes Study Guide for "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening": “Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening” is generally regarded as Frost's...

Latest answer posted April 21, 2014, 10:21 pm (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

The rhyme scheme seems intended to convey an impression of softly falling snow. In the third stanza the speaker indicates that the snowfall is not heavy when he uses the words "easy wind and downy...

Latest answer posted February 4, 2016, 12:11 am (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

Very little can be said about the speaker on "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening" in concrete terms. His name, age, profession, and place of residence are all unknown, but certain facts and...

Latest answer posted September 7, 2020, 2:52 pm (UTC)

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