Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening Questions and Answers

Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

Frost uses these descriptive terms to create a sense of atmosphere. The word "darkest" is applied to the evening: this term is a superlative, meaning that something that is "darkest" is darker than...

Latest answer posted August 20, 2018, 8:20 am (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

The setting of the poem is the forest during the winter. The speaker refers to the "woods" that seem to be set at quite a distance from "the village," where the owner of the land on which the...

Latest answer posted January 16, 2020, 1:01 pm (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

The meaning of "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening" is generally personal, depending on the reader's perception. Attempts to read more into the poem than is visible on the surface, or more than...

Latest answer posted September 11, 2012, 8:23 pm (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

The speaker is deep into the woods when he speaks these lines. He says that he knows the person to whom this land and trees belong, but that person's home is far away, in "the village."...

Latest answer posted August 8, 2017, 11:45 pm (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

Frost uses alliteration in this poem, which is repeating the same consonant at the beginning of words in close proximity. Examples of this include "sound’s the sweep" in stanza two, with its...

Latest answer posted September 17, 2017, 11:59 am (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

When I looked up "forest" in the New Oxford American Dictionary, I found the following definition: "a large area covered chiefly with trees and undergrowth." When I looked up "woods" or "wood" in...

Latest answer posted August 6, 2020, 12:12 pm (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

The shaking of the harness bells is an example of auditory imagery. Along with the sweeping sound of “easy wind and downy flake,” the tinkle of the bells was the only sound that could be heard in...

Latest answer posted February 15, 2016, 12:49 pm (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

The title is certainly pretty basic, but then, so, in some ways, is the poem itself. I think the appropriateness of the title depends on what you think the poem's message is. Is the poem about a...

Latest answer posted September 23, 2018, 8:16 pm (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

The first question to ask is: “Is the poet the narrator in the first person”? This is a legitimate question because, according to Aristotle, a poem only has one narrator, and our assumption is that...

Latest answer posted February 9, 2016, 10:24 pm (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

An interesting question! I think it can certainly be argued that the speaker in this poem is filled with regrets at the end for a number of reasons. The speaker observes that the woods are "lovely"...

Latest answer posted March 7, 2020, 11:05 am (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

The poem 'Stopping By Woods On A Snowy Evening' by Robert Frost suggests many ideas and themes for example: possibilities that are out of reach, taboos, secrets, silence, darkness, ignorance and...

Latest answer posted September 4, 2013, 2:33 pm (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

The first stanza of the poem conveys the solitude of the speaker in these woods as well as the tranquil scene that has caused him to pause and enjoy. He says, Whose woods these are I think I...

Latest answer posted March 7, 2016, 12:35 pm (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

The tone of a poem can be characterized as the author's attitude toward their subject. "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening" has two quite different possible tones, depending on the reader's...

Latest answer posted September 8, 2020, 11:11 am (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

"Previous obligations" can be described as responsibilities that a person has prior to something else coming up. Most people read the line, "But I have promises to keep," as the speaker's...

Latest answer posted February 11, 2016, 1:38 pm (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

The narrator of "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening" is not the focus, and so little can be inferred about him by the text, assuming he is not simply Robert Frost himself. The narrator is...

Latest answer posted September 11, 2012, 9:35 pm (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

This question has already been answered here on eNotes. Here is a comprehensive link for you: http://www.enotes.com/stopping-by-woods-snowy-evening/q-and-a/tags/summary

Latest answer posted May 30, 2011, 5:02 am (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

The standard of beauty in this poem is undoubtedly nature. The speaker is fascinated by it and decides to stop in the woods to admire the winter scene although he has "promises to keep, and miles...

Latest answer posted April 6, 2016, 10:49 am (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

In the second stanza of the poem, the speaker says that his "little horse must think it queer / To stop without a farmhouse near." In other words, the horse seems to be quite used to the kind of...

Latest answer posted September 7, 2020, 11:08 am (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

The adjective "downy" does seem to suggest that the snowflakes are being compared to "down," which is defined as a noun meaning the soft, first plumage of many young birds or the soft under-plumage...

Latest answer posted May 3, 2014, 6:14 pm (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

In the poem human beings are seen as always in a hurry. They have places to go and things to do. It is not the norm to stop in the woods. Yet nature holds a certain allure. A line by line look at...

Latest answer posted August 8, 2011, 1:16 pm (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

The presence of the horse reminds us of the obligations that the speaker has yet to fulfill on his life's journey. He still has miles to go before he sleeps, before he comes to the end of his life,...

Latest answer posted April 14, 2019, 10:42 am (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

This poem deals with many themes, with nature being the main focus of the poem. So, one of the primary themes is the beauty of nature and the speaker's fascination with it. Many of Frost's poems...

Latest answer posted April 10, 2016, 6:28 pm (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

In the third stanza of the poem, the speaker's horse shakes his harness bells to "ask if there is some mistake." The speaker of the poem and his horse may make these kinds of trips often, and so...

Latest answer posted September 7, 2020, 11:31 am (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

A common interpretation of Robert Frost’s “Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening” is that the poem is in contemplation of death, or at least the finality of death. Some critics who subscribe to this...

Latest answer posted March 10, 2016, 5:52 pm (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

There is also a sense that snow takes the "edge" off things. Some of the sharpness of "real" or "practical" life is removed, and things tend to blend together into...

Latest answer posted November 2, 2008, 1:05 pm (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

"Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening" can be read as an allegory. Frost devotes the first three stanzas of the poem to describe the woods he comes across while he was on his way to accomplish some...

Latest answer posted December 27, 2015, 1:36 pm (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

It’s the unusual beauty of the woods that bewitches the poet. While on his way, he halts to appreciate the serene magnificence of the woods and revel in its soothing silence. The first sight that...

Latest answer posted September 15, 2015, 7:07 am (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

The opening lines of this poem have the narrative character speculating on who owns the woods. The main point of this speculation is to inform the reader that the woods are not the narrator’s, but...

Latest answer posted September 28, 2016, 6:35 pm (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

One way to look at this poem is through the theme of the contemplation of life. In the poem, the speaker has paused in the middle of the woods to look at the landscape and admire its beauty. Note...

Latest answer posted April 9, 2016, 5:02 pm (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

In Robert Frost’s “Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening,” the speaker hears only the ringing of his horse’s harness bells and the "easy wind" upon the snow's “downy flake.” This peaceful forest is...

Latest answer posted September 8, 2020, 11:41 am (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

I would say that the word "forest" suggests a large area covered with trees in a natural state; whereas the word "woods" suggests a smaller stand of trees which may be either virgin growth or...

Latest answer posted November 15, 2015, 1:32 pm (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

In "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening," Robert Frost calls on nature to set the stage for the illusion he creates of normalcy. However, everything is not as it seems. The woods, though...

Latest answer posted August 18, 2012, 3:01 pm (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

While many literary critics debate the tone of Robert Frost's "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening," the poet does provide several clues about the speaker's personality. From the first stanza, we...

Latest answer posted November 14, 2015, 6:00 pm (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

The poem "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening," written by Robert Frost, describes the speaker's journey homeward on one of the darkest nights of the year. It is cold and desolate, yet the...

Latest answer posted November 29, 2015, 4:16 am (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

Inverted means in backwards or unusual order. Inverted word choice means the words or in unusual order, or a different order than we would usually have them in spoken speech. Poets usually invert...

Latest answer posted September 4, 2014, 3:59 am (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

It seems as though the speaker wants to stop and watch the woods fill up with snow because it is calm, quiet, and serene in the forest. It is likely that his daily life cannot be characterized in...

Latest answer posted September 7, 2020, 12:25 pm (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

Throughout the poem, the speaker stops with his horse to view the snowy forest on the darkest evening of the year. The speaker and his horse are completely alone to witness the tranquil landscape,...

Latest answer posted September 5, 2017, 5:27 pm (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

By the phrase "fill up with snow," the speaker wishes to convey that it is snowing, and heavily enough to "fill" the woods with snow. By this he means both that the sky is full of snowflakes and...

Latest answer posted June 25, 2019, 12:40 am (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

In Robert Frost's poem "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening," the speaker is passing by with his horse and is moved by the beauty of the snow-covered woods, and so he stops to watch the serene...

Latest answer posted September 8, 2020, 1:31 pm (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

The Robert Frost poem "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening" paints a beautiful word picture of a wooded country road on a winter's evening while it is snowing. The speaker mentions in the first...

Latest answer posted January 3, 2018, 1:28 am (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

The horse's behavior suggests that this is a familiar route. No doubt it runs from the speaker's farm into town and back, and the horse has been over it countless times. Proof that it is familiar...

Latest answer posted May 11, 2015, 8:40 pm (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

In his poem "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening," Frost conveys a sense of isolation and silence with the imagery of the snowy setting in a country field, the softness of the word sounds, and a...

Latest answer posted March 15, 2016, 7:54 pm (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

In "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening," there is significance in the simple incident. The speaker has seen the woods fill up with snow many time, but he decides to stop this snowy evening, the...

Latest answer posted May 12, 2012, 7:33 pm (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

"Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening" centers around the speaker's decision to pause his journey to observe a beautiful, snow-filled forest. In the second stanza of the poem, the speaker says that...

Latest answer posted September 7, 2020, 11:22 am (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

The poem is arranged in a total of 5 sentences. Stanzas 1,2, 4 are each one sentence. Stanza 3 is comprised of two sentences. Each sentence is a declarative sentence, with all but the first...

Latest answer posted April 24, 2010, 10:34 pm (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

Quite a few similarities exist between the Frost poem and the Bronte poem. First of all, the setting is quite similar. In "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening," the speaker finds himself in "the...

Latest answer posted December 14, 2017, 11:00 pm (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

The "darkest evening of the year" occurs on December 21 in the northern hemisphere. This is the day when there is the least daylight due to the tilt of the Earth's axis. Therefore, December 21 also...

Latest answer posted September 7, 2020, 11:21 am (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

One interpretation of "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening" that must be inferred rather than seen from context is that the narrator is not on a business trip at all, but rather on a journey of...

Latest answer posted September 11, 2012, 9:45 pm (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

The poem deals with many themes, and its attention is focused on the speaker's infatuation with nature and the natural world he wants to be a part of. When we read the poem for the first time, we...

Latest answer posted April 10, 2016, 7:13 pm (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

The poem has many different possible themes. One of the most poignant is the theme of sadness, or of possibilities that cannot be taken because of current responsibilities. The narrator wants to...

Latest answer posted September 11, 2012, 8:44 pm (UTC)

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