Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening Questions and Answers

Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

One theme central to "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening" is the contrast between society and nature. From the first stanza, the speaker is on a journey between two places. He decides to "stop"...

Latest answer posted November 29, 2020, 10:49 am (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

When determining rhyme scheme, you need to examine the final word in each line of the poem. The last word in the first line is indicated by the letter a. If the final word in the second line rhymes...

Latest answer posted January 25, 2021, 10:51 am (UTC)

3 educator answers

Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

Many readers do choose to see the darker, contemplation of suicide interpretation in the last lines. However, Frost himself often discounted this interpretation and suggested that it "was just a...

Latest answer posted August 17, 2010, 12:10 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

In the first stanza the speaker tells why he is stopping by the woods. It is "To watch his woods fill up with snow." It is a cold night but apparently not too cold for the speaker to stop for a few...

Latest answer posted April 19, 2014, 10:14 pm (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

Many critics have opined that this poem contains a conscious or unconscious death wish. The very common interpretation is that the speaker, presumably Frost himself, finds the woods so "lovely,...

Latest answer posted April 22, 2014, 12:12 am (UTC)

7 educator answers

Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

Figures of speech are words used in a non-literal sense. In this poem, Frost is using literary devices or figures of speech to try to make a larger point about life. When he says, for instance,...

Latest answer posted November 25, 2017, 1:41 pm (UTC)

8 educator answers

Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

The meaning of the line "And miles to go before I sleep" has been contested for decades by readers and scholars alike. The most obvious meaning is a literal—the traveler is talking about the...

Latest answer posted September 7, 2020, 11:41 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

This poem by Robert Frost could be read completely literally as the story of a man stopping in a quiet wood, with his horse, to appreciate the beauty of the snowy evening. However, it could also be...

Latest answer posted December 20, 2020, 10:44 am (UTC)

4 educator answers

Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

Most often discussed in "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening" is its rich visual, auditory, and tactile imagery. Readers cannot help but picture a dark forest being blanketed by white snow. The...

Latest answer posted April 21, 2021, 3:14 pm (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

The horse is shaking his harness bells to ask if stopping is a mistake. This poem describes a person that is driving a horse-drawn carriage on a snowy evening through some woods. The clue to why...

Latest answer posted October 20, 2015, 12:34 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

The horse thinks it is "queer" or odd to stop in the middle of the woods because it seems his owner never does this. We know this because the speaker tells us that his "little" horse is used to...

Latest answer posted April 11, 2019, 2:42 pm (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

Frost has been quoted as saying the following: Everything written is as good as it is dramatic. It need not declare itself in form, but it is drama or nothing. "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy...

Latest answer posted April 22, 2014, 10:00 pm (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

The first sound mentioned in the poem occurs when the narrator's horse "gives his harness bells a shake." The narrator suggests the noise of the bells indicates the horse's impatience with standing...

Latest answer posted March 26, 2013, 9:54 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

The final two lines of Frost's poem "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening" convey the sheer distance the narrator still has to "go before I sleep." By repeating the line "And miles to go before I...

Latest answer posted January 10, 2018, 7:25 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

In repeating the penultimate line of the poem as the poem’s final line, Frost draws attention to it, both accentuating the speaker's feelings of wistfulness and underscoring the figurative...

Latest answer posted September 8, 2020, 1:06 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

In Robert Frost's "Stopping By Woods on a Snowy Evening," line 8 of the poem mentions that the events of the poem take place on the "darkest evening of the year." There are two possible meanings...

Latest answer posted June 11, 2018, 6:36 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

At the end of "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening," the speaker says that he has "promises" to keep. In this context, promises are his responsibilities and duties. They are what compel him to...

Latest answer posted September 7, 2020, 11:41 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

In the poem "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening," the speaker shares a precious moment with us. On the way to keep some promises, he stops his ride briefly to take in the beauty of the frozen...

Latest answer posted June 10, 2016, 6:44 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

In the poem, an individual is briefly arrested by a beautiful winter scene. Despite the fact that he has so much work to do and obligations to which he must attend ("promises to keep"), he feels...

Latest answer posted July 23, 2018, 12:42 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

Robert Frost wrote this poem, along with many other of his most famous compositions, at his house in southern Vermont. The house sat on seven acres of wooded land, and Frost himself apparently...

Latest answer posted November 24, 2018, 10:27 pm (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

As mentioned in other posts, the horse is unused to stopping in this open space—"Between the woods and frozen lake"—as there is no sense of purpose in doing so: no building, no capacity for work on...

Latest answer posted May 11, 2019, 10:15 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

The speaker in this poem gives no identifying details about himself, except the fact that he is on a journey with his horse and that he has made "promises" to others and still has "miles to go"...

Latest answer posted November 19, 2018, 5:08 pm (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

There is a mistaken assumption built into this question—that poets are preachers or philosophers or moralizers in every poem they write. Here, Frost is an observer, a contemplater, and (even if...

Latest answer posted October 22, 2012, 3:44 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

In "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening," the man and his horse seem to have an understanding that they will perform their duties with no lollygagging. Thus when the man stops to watch the woods...

Latest answer posted June 18, 2017, 3:51 am (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

Frost uses imagery, which is description involving the five senses of sight, sound, touch, taste, and smell, to put us at the scene. His focus is on sight and sound. As for sight, he locates us...

Latest answer posted May 27, 2018, 10:57 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

The last line of "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening" is arguably the most important because it holds the allegorical key to the poem's overall meaning. Repeating the line emphasizes its...

Latest answer posted June 11, 2018, 10:36 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

The physical journey the poem's speaker undertakes is by horse and carriage; he has stopped in a remote area between a lake and a patch of woods owned by someone the speaker knows in the village....

Latest answer posted May 26, 2019, 9:32 am (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

The first line reading "And miles to go before I sleep" is probably intended literally. The speaker is traveling some distance in a horse-drawn sleigh and still have some distance to cover before...

Latest answer posted April 22, 2014, 12:24 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

The poem "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening" was written in 1922 by Robert Frost. It was included in his Pulitzer Prize–winning collection New Hampshire: A Poem with Notes and Grace Notes in...

Latest answer posted February 25, 2019, 1:13 pm (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

The narrator gives us very little information about the owner of the woods in the poem, as the main subject is the narrator's own experience of the snow and isolation of the area. The narrator of...

Latest answer posted July 9, 2017, 8:55 am (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

When we discuss a poem’s structure, what we are talking about is the form the poem takes and, by extension, how it conveys information and experience to the reader. In the case of “Stopping by...

Latest answer posted September 8, 2020, 12:14 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

"Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening" is a lyric poem. A lyric poem is one that expresses personal emotion, often using the first person "I" voice to express what the poem's speaker is feeling....

Latest answer posted September 7, 2020, 11:29 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

The rhyme scheme seems intended to suggest very subtly the look and feel of falling snow. For example, the first stanza's rhymes are AABA. Then the B is caught up in the second stanza and becomes...

Latest answer posted April 21, 2014, 11:51 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

Robert Frost answers this question himself. He does so in the first stanza. He stops To watch his woods fill up with snow. Frost was extremely sensitive to the beauty of nature. He is similar to...

Latest answer posted April 16, 2014, 7:15 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

Frost's poem is one that is near bittersweet in its reminiscent quality. As the rider pauses to reflect, we experience the beauty of the wintertime imagery made by snow, the jingle of the harness...

Latest answer posted April 3, 2009, 12:44 am (UTC)

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Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

In the first stanza of the poem, the mood is one of wonder and admiration because the speaker has stopped in the woods to watch the snow fall. This is clearly an enjoyable and interesting activity...

Latest answer posted January 16, 2017, 1:58 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

Robert Frost has been quoted as saying: Everything written is as good as it is dramatic. It need not declare itself in form, but it is drama or nothing. This explains a lot about his poetry. In...

Latest answer posted December 20, 2015, 7:17 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

The primary and most evident conflict for the narrator (or overall "man" as indicated in the question) is between his responsibilities and desires. That is, the narrator (and his horse) have...

Latest answer posted May 6, 2016, 7:00 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

The poet is probably on a mundane, routine errand and only has simple promises to keep. It appears that he lives on a farm and has driven into some little village in a horse-drawn sleigh to shop...

Latest answer posted December 19, 2015, 6:18 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

The main role of the horse in the narrative of the poem is to emphasize, first, how unusual it is for the narrator to stop and watch a snowfall, second, to emphasize how long the narrator stays...

Latest answer posted February 28, 2016, 2:03 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

The speaker of the poem, who is presumably Robert Frost himself, thinks he knows who owns the woods he has stopped to look at. The first stanza reads: Whose woods these are I think I know. His...

Latest answer posted February 7, 2016, 5:27 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

Frost's poem "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening" is a tender poem that relies heavily on imagery to reveal the vulnerability of its speaker. Imagery is commonly defined as descriptive language...

Latest answer posted March 15, 2018, 2:23 am (UTC)

3 educator answers

Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

This poem uses imagery, language that conveys sensory information, in order to help us understand how solitary the speaker is, and how dark and beautiful the woods are. The second stanza is most...

Latest answer posted August 13, 2017, 12:33 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

Robert Frost once answered a similar question with the statement: "If I wanted you to know I'd had told you in the poem." Feelings from poetry are intensely personal, and a poem that creates deep...

Latest answer posted September 11, 2012, 8:36 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

In response to the answer posted above, a different construction could be put upon the phrase 'miles to go before I sleep'. Instead of referring literally to the speaker's journey home, it could...

Latest answer posted February 15, 2015, 9:07 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

In "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening," by Robert Frost, the speaker of the poem (which of course is not necessarily Frost himself) stops his horse-drawn carriage (or sled, since it is snowing)...

Latest answer posted July 29, 2013, 4:59 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

In the famous poem "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening" by Robert Frost, a rider on a journey stops his horse in somebody else's woods and watches the snow as it falls. Several different moods...

Latest answer posted April 11, 2019, 2:03 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

I'm not sure I would call Frost's "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening" allegorical in any sense. One might say it's symbolic or that it involves an extended metaphor, but I don't see it as an...

Latest answer posted April 17, 2010, 3:58 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

"Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening" is a melodic poem by Robert Frost that focuses on the captivating power of nature. As he rides his horse, he encounters an especially lovely area of woods and...

Latest answer posted May 26, 2019, 1:42 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

According to N. Arthur Bleau, Frost provided the context of his inspiration for "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening" at a public reading in 1947. When asked to identify his own favorite poem out...

Latest answer posted September 8, 2020, 11:44 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

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