Sonnet 55 Questions and Answers

Sonnet 55

Shakespeare's Sonnet 55 is highly rhetorical, the conventional boast of the confident poet that his work is destined for immortality. As befits this theme, the poem is full of literary devices....

Latest answer posted April 25, 2021 5:36 pm UTC

4 educator answers

Sonnet 55

Sonnet 55 is one of Shakespeare's most famous sonnets. He is simply saying that the poem he is writing to some unnamed person will last longer than marble gravestones or stone monuments decorated...

Latest answer posted July 13, 2012 12:23 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Sonnet 55

Sonnet 55's tone is one of somber celebration, appropriate for praising someone of high status. All of the poet's allusions are solemn and concerned with death. "Gilded monuments" are built after...

Latest answer posted February 22, 2018 7:19 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Sonnet 55

The theme of "Sonnet 55" is one shared by several of Shakespeare's sonnets in his "Fair Youth" cycle (Sonnets 1–126). The theme is that, through writing about his beloved, Shakespeare is able to...

Latest answer posted March 13, 2018 9:16 am UTC

2 educator answers

Sonnet 55

The central idea is that the sonnet the poet is writing for some unknown loved one will outlast all the marble grave markers and even the large gold-embellished stone monuments of the most...

Latest answer posted September 16, 2012 10:31 am UTC

1 educator answer

Sonnet 55

The speaker is referring to the traditional Christian belief that all the dead will be resurrected on the Day of Judgement. This belief is expressed in "The Service for the Burial of the Dead" in...

Latest answer posted February 28, 2016 7:42 am UTC

1 educator answer

Sonnet 55

William Shakespeare wrote Sonnet LV following the form of the English sonnet. This type of sonnet has fourteen lines with three quatrains and a terminal couplet. This sonnet is one of several...

Latest answer posted September 3, 2012 10:20 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Sonnet 55

Shakespeare suggests in this, as in many of his other sonnets, that the poem makes the subject immortal because the poem itself is immortal. The sonnet is not the words printed on any piece of...

Latest answer posted July 5, 2014 10:43 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Sonnet 55

Shakespeare's language and tone in Sonnet 55 are, to an extent, more distant and austere than one finds in many of the sonnets. One notices that the speaker addresses the beloved, the Fair Youth,...

Latest answer posted April 16, 2018 6:34 am UTC

1 educator answer

Sonnet 55

I would just like to point out a beautiful use of language in one line of Shakespeare's Sonnet LV. This is to be found at the end of the line "When wasteful war shall statues overturn..." The...

Latest answer posted January 6, 2014 10:52 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Sonnet 55

Shakespeare's diction in "Sonnet 55" may be considered harsh when describing the realities of this world and lofty when talking about his love. The theme of the poem is that while the base things...

Latest answer posted September 29, 2010 1:13 am UTC

1 educator answer

Sonnet 55

The speaker in this sonnet is obviously Shakespeare himself. He is very confident of his genius as a poet, and he is saying that the sonnet he is in the process of creating will outlast structures...

Latest answer posted June 19, 2012 1:10 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Sonnet 55

If I had to attempt to capture the entire subject matter of this one particular sonnet in two words and only two words, I might go with "poetry power." This particular sonnet has a speaker talking...

Latest answer posted March 26, 2019 5:14 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Sonnet 55

The theme of this sonnet is actually a theme that concerns many of Shakespeare's sonnets: that of the immortality of his beloved in the face of time and the way that commemorating his beloved's...

Latest answer posted July 17, 2011 10:21 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Sonnet 55

Shakespeare’s sonnet 55 is one of many poems in his collection of sonnets that deal with the theme of mutability, or the constant change and instability that are typical of life on earth....

Latest answer posted April 20, 2012 9:16 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Sonnet 55

Stated simply, this is a love poem. (Sonnets often feature love as their central subject matter, though it is by no means necessary.) Shakespeare speaks to a specific love in this poem, though he...

Latest answer posted September 21, 2017 1:58 am UTC

2 educator answers

Sonnet 55

Sonnet 55 most likely has two purposes, the most important being to insure the poet's lover that his or her beauty will outlive time and events and, less important, to claim the primacy of the...

Latest answer posted February 19, 2012 5:15 am UTC

1 educator answer

Sonnet 55

Through the indestructibility of verse, the poet seeks to lend his beloved immortality. This is main idea of Shakespeare’s Sonnet 55. Its first quatrain begins with the poet’s bold declaration that...

Latest answer posted March 17, 2016 5:44 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Sonnet 55

Sonnet 55 is one of the best-known poems in Shakespeare's collection of 154, and is often used as an example of the love and admiration he felt for the unnamed recipient of the poems. Sonnet 55...

Latest answer posted January 10, 2012 1:46 am UTC

1 educator answer

Sonnet 55

I have read Shakespeare's Sonnet 55 many times over the years, but it was only on reading your question that the thought occurred to me that the person the speaker is addressing (presumably a young...

Latest answer posted May 15, 2012 10:56 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Sonnet 55

Shakespeare begins sonnet 55 with the profound declaration that the stone upon which the sonnet is carved will out last the living, but confidently asserts that “You” will  "outlive this mere...

Latest answer posted July 9, 2007 7:33 am UTC

3 educator answers

Sonnet 55

William Shakespeare's Sonnet 55 explores the immortality of the subjects of poetry through the power of verse. Shakespeare uses precise diction to paint a destructive image of time. Phrases like...

Latest answer posted April 18, 2010 8:21 am UTC

1 educator answer

Sonnet 55

I have difficulty seeing where in the sonnet you think the speaker's spirits rise (as they undoubtedly do in Sonnet 29). The mood of the piece seems to be pretty much the same from beginning to...

Latest answer posted May 15, 2012 8:57 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Sonnet 55

According to Shakespeare's Sonnet 55, his writing itself—"this powerful rhyme"—is the strongest thing a person can create in order to protect against the potency of death. He refers to "monuments"...

Latest answer posted November 27, 2018 5:19 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Sonnet 55

Shakespeare is essentially saying that the sonnet he is writing to someone he loves will live longer than any existing monuments. He was exactly right, because this sonnet, as well as his others,...

Latest answer posted June 1, 2012 7:13 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Sonnet 55

Sonnet 55 by William Shakespeare is a testimony to memories of a loved one. Shakespeare is saying, as mentioned in Post #3, that the memory of the departed loved one will live on because of the...

Latest answer posted September 24, 2012 6:05 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Sonnet 55

This excellent sonnet is preoccupied with a common concern that runs throughout Shakespeare's collection of Sonnets: how poetry can give immortality to the beauty and love of the person that the...

Latest answer posted March 15, 2011 12:34 am UTC

1 educator answer

Sonnet 55

Sonnet 55 uses the form and structure that is now called the "Shakespearean" sonnet because of Shakespeare's use of it throughout his sonnet cycle. It differs from the Petrarchan sonnet form that...

Latest answer posted April 10, 2018 5:38 am UTC

1 educator answer