Sonnet 29 Questions and Answers

Sonnet 29

When Shakespeare's sad and woeful narrator, after recounting all his sorrows, thinks of his beloved, his mood changes to happiness. He likens this change of mood (this "state") to the beautiful...

Latest answer posted August 5, 2019, 7:57 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Sonnet 29

In Sonnet 29 by William Shakespeare, the narrator is going through a troubled time. He feels insecure, in disgrace, all alone, without friends, and envious of others. He almost despises himself....

Latest answer posted February 17, 2020, 4:02 pm (UTC)

4 educator answers

Sonnet 29

When we look for figures of speech, we're looking for words and phrases that are not meant to be taken literally, so we're specifically looking to identify these devices: figurative comparisons...

Latest answer posted May 4, 2016, 8:41 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Sonnet 29

In the sonnet's first nine lines the speaker is despondent and depressed. He feels he is an "outcast," and unfortunate ("in disgrace with fortune"). He cries out to heaven in his despair, but feels...

Latest answer posted August 7, 2018, 1:08 am (UTC)

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Sonnet 29

The speaker is distressed about his fate, but when he thinks of his love, his condition improves. The condition improving is then compared in a simile: his mood improves and gets better "Like to...

Latest answer posted May 25, 2012, 2:16 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Sonnet 29

Shakespeare's Sonnet 29 is a love sonnet disguised as a poem about unfulfilled ambition and a career of disappointment and frustration. In lines 11-12, the speaker of the sonnet uses the simile...

Latest answer posted March 11, 2018, 8:38 am (UTC)

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Sonnet 29

The speaker is in a pretty despondent state for most of the poem, and no wonder: Everything seems to be going wrong in his life. The men whom he meets in society despise him, and fortune's wheel...

Latest answer posted July 10, 2019, 8:12 am (UTC)

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Sonnet 29

In the first line of the this poem, Shakespeare uses synecdoche, a figure of speech in which a part represents the whole and vice versa. By stating that he is in disgrace with "men's eyes," he does...

Latest answer posted December 23, 2016, 3:10 pm (UTC)

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Sonnet 29

Basically this speaker mentions all the things that are going horribly wrong in his life (or at least he sees it that way). Then at the end, when he's been horribly down on himself, his mind...

Latest answer posted March 1, 2011, 12:36 am (UTC)

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Sonnet 29

The speaker begins "Sonnet 29" envying men who are more fortunate than he. The allusion to "Fortune" in line one suggests that the speaker feels that unstoppable Fate itself has worked against him,...

Latest answer posted April 11, 2016, 12:06 am (UTC)

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Sonnet 29

The poem is designed as Shakespearean sonnet. The 14 lines have a rhyme scheme of alternating rhyming lines until the couplet that rhymes with itself. The surface meaning of the poem concerns a...

Latest answer posted July 18, 2009, 1:10 am (UTC)

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Sonnet 29

Despite being only mentioned once in the entire poem, the lark is by far the poem's most potent and vivid image. The lark is presented to readers in a simile in line eleven. Haply I think on...

Latest answer posted July 8, 2019, 9:49 pm (UTC)

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Sonnet 29

The speaker in “Sonnet 29” leads a life full of trouble and great unhappiness. As he tells us in the very first line of the poem, he finds himself in “disgrace with fortune and men's eyes.” It is...

Latest answer posted March 29, 2021, 11:45 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Sonnet 29

For evidence of dejection in the poem, look no further than the first four lines: When, in disgrace with fortune and men’s eyes, I all alone beweep my outcast state, And trouble deaf heaven with...

Latest answer posted August 8, 2019, 7:48 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Sonnet 29

At the beginning of the sonnet, the narrator laments about his life. He feels like an outcast and curses his fate. He also wishes that he was popular, wealthy, and more talented like other men....

Latest answer posted October 20, 2016, 2:24 pm (UTC)

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Sonnet 29

The themes of alienation, failure, self-doubt, self-loathing, envy at the success of others, hopelessness, and desperate loneliness are carried through the first eight lines of the poem. Then a...

Latest answer posted July 30, 2019, 5:49 pm (UTC)

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Sonnet 29

There are several ways to define the moral of this poem. One might be-be grateful for what you have and quit wishing for more. The speaker appears to be unsatisfied with what he is given. He wants...

Latest answer posted March 15, 2008, 10:32 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Sonnet 29

Your question asks about characteristics of iambic pentameter. The characteristics of iambic pentameter are described in its very definition. It is a metrical pattern in which a line of poetry...

Latest answer posted November 20, 2015, 11:19 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Sonnet 29

In Shakespeare's Sonnet 29, "When in disgrace with Fortune and men's eyes," the author (who could be any man, not necessarily Shakespeare) starts the sonnet by speaking of his life. In William...

Latest answer posted March 8, 2011, 9:35 am (UTC)

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Sonnet 29

You do understand hyperbole to be great exaggeration I assume. That is what we need to find, instances where a person argues something that really seems to be not true, or at least beyond the scope...

Latest answer posted September 26, 2010, 7:40 am (UTC)

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Sonnet 29

Love aids the speaker of Shakespeare's "Sonnet 29" specifically by breaking him out of a depressive spiral of negative thoughts, reminding him that though he may not have riches or popularity he is...

Latest answer posted June 13, 2018, 6:12 pm (UTC)

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Sonnet 29

While Sonnet XXIX has the rhyme scheme of a Shakespearean sonnet, its thematic format is that of the Petrarchan sonnet in which the octave states the problem: the brooding poet senses his...

Latest answer posted January 28, 2015, 7:26 pm (UTC)

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Sonnet 29

I think that the speaker is suffering from feelings of inferiority. He thinks that other people are better than him in so many ways. He thinks about how other people are more popular that he is....

Latest answer posted April 25, 2011, 7:55 pm (UTC)

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Sonnet 29

The only example of poetic license in Shakespeare's Sonnet 29 would seem to be contained in the beautiful metaphor: ...and then my state,Like to the Lark at break of day arisingFrom sullen earth,...

Latest answer posted January 21, 2016, 12:42 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Sonnet 29

Shakespeare's Sonnet 29, "When, in disgrace with fortune and men’s eyes", is written in the first person. The narrator initially describes himself as somewhat of an outsider, for who things are not...

Latest answer posted October 2, 2015, 11:44 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Sonnet 29

Theme and Structure Theme The theme of Shakespeare's Sonnet 29 involves how man's life may differ depending on whether his life is full of material wealth vs. spiritual wealth, or spiritual wealth...

Latest answer posted July 5, 2015, 6:26 pm (UTC)

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Sonnet 29

Sonnet 29 is a Shakespearean or English sonnet. This sonnet form is often known by Shakespeare's name, although others used the form before he adopted it. In a Shakespearean sonnet, the fourteen...

Latest answer posted March 28, 2019, 7:31 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

Sonnet 29

While Sonnet XXIX has the rhyme scheme of a Shakespearean sonnet, its thematic format is that of the Petrarchan sonnet in which the octave states the problem: the brooding poet senses his...

Latest answer posted January 29, 2015, 1:20 am (UTC)

4 educator answers

Sonnet 29

The speaker spends the first nine lines of the sonnet describing his feelings of disgrace and loneliness, how he often curses his fate and feels destined to be envious of others forever, so much so...

Latest answer posted December 19, 2018, 1:41 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

Sonnet 29

The speaker grieves, or bemoans his existence because he doesn't have the money, art or scope he sees in other men. He uses phrases like "rich in hope" which means promise, in particular reference...

Latest answer posted November 18, 2010, 11:06 pm (UTC)

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Sonnet 29

The audience in this sonnet is the speaker's lover, though the thoughts are penned in solitude rather than spoken to the lovers' face. It is not until line 10 that we see redemption for the...

Latest answer posted April 23, 2007, 5:35 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Sonnet 29

Sonnets break into sections, and the turning point in this sonnet is the line 10: “Haply I think on thee, and then my state…” After speaking of his moments of despair, envy, and depression in the...

Latest answer posted August 27, 2013, 3:45 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Sonnet 29

In Shakespeare's lovely Sonnet 29, the author uses the structure of an English sonnet (also known as an Elizabethan or a Shakespearean sonnet) to organize his ideas. This kind of sonnet has a total...

Latest answer posted October 7, 2017, 10:35 pm (UTC)

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Sonnet 29

From Shakespeare's point of view according to Sonnet 29, the significance of love is that it can bring wealth and songs and hope. The quatrain bemoans the times when fate leads to loss of wealth...

Latest answer posted May 10, 2010, 3:06 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Sonnet 29

This is largely a matter of speculation, but one could say that "Sonnet 29," with its tone of hurt and self-pity, is a response by Shakespeare to attacks on his professional reputation as an actor...

Latest answer posted July 23, 2018, 7:24 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Sonnet 29

The speaker here is commonly thought to be the Fair Youth of many of Shakespeare's other sonnets, and in the first 8 lines of Sonnet 29, he is in a serious state of despair. Both fortune and men...

Latest answer posted April 3, 2016, 11:36 pm (UTC)

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Sonnet 29

The context of Shakespeare's sonnet "A Consolation" is that the speaker has fallen on disfavor from his fellow man--and apparently not for the first time. The cause of the disfavor is not stated....

Latest answer posted February 11, 2010, 12:21 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Sonnet 29

What brings the speaker out of his mood of dejection and despair is remembering the person to whom this famous sonnet is addressed. Because the speaker knows himself to be loved by this person, it...

Latest answer posted April 24, 2013, 12:14 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Sonnet 29

In Shakespeare's Sonnet 29, the poet is despondent through the first two quatrains (groups of 4 lines). Whether he is now "in disgrace with fortune and men's eyes" is not clear; the poet may...

Latest answer posted August 15, 2009, 1:51 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Sonnet 29

The turning point in Shakespeare's Sonnet 29 comes at the ninth line, which reads: Yet in these thoughts myself almost despising, The preceding eight lines of the sonnet describe the poet's...

Latest answer posted February 21, 2015, 12:29 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Sonnet 29

The problem, for the speaker, is that he feels that he has so many disadvantages and misfortunes that he cannot be happy. He feels like an "outcast," perhaps alienated from society or even from...

Latest answer posted April 11, 2018, 1:49 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

Sonnet 29

William Shakespeare wrote over 154 sonnets. Sonnets 1-129 were dedicated to a young man that Shakespeare loved and admired. Sonnet 29 falls into this category. The poem is written in the English...

Latest answer posted January 27, 2013, 4:02 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Sonnet 29

All of Shakespeare's sonnets were published in 1609, and they were probably circulated in manuscript form since about 1598. The composition of sonnet cycles--and Sonnet 29 is part of...

Latest answer posted November 11, 2007, 8:58 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Sonnet 29

The speaker of Shakespeare's "Sonnet 29" laments his sorry state in the world throughout the three quatrains of the poem. The speaker's problem has to do with a sense of dissatisfaction with his...

Latest answer posted September 2, 2018, 10:46 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Sonnet 29

The first types of figures of speech we encounter in Shakespeare's Sonnet 29 are those of sound. The poem is a sonnet consisting of fourteen lines of iambic pentameter. The lines use the regular...

Latest answer posted June 20, 2016, 1:12 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

Sonnet 29

The simple remembrance of his beloved, whomever that may be, changes his state of mind. The speaker is in a profound state of self-loathing. He complains of his own status, ability, situation in...

Latest answer posted January 25, 2011, 6:44 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Sonnet 29

In order to take a look at paraphrasing this 14 lines, I am going to break it into 4 sections: 1. the first 4 lines, 2. the next 4 lines, 3. the third 4 lines, and 4. the last two lines. 1. During...

Latest answer posted October 17, 2010, 3:01 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

Sonnet 29

The contrary states of mind are of that of envy versus contentment. In the first half of the sonnet, the speaker is envious. He feels that he is "all alone" and that he is in an...

Latest answer posted June 25, 2008, 12:22 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

Sonnet 29

In "Sonnet 29," Shakespeare is contrasting the world and all its troubles with the happiness and stability he obtains from his lover. In the speaker's everyday professional life, he is subjected to...

Latest answer posted September 8, 2018, 5:57 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Sonnet 29

When, in disgrace with Fortune and men's eyes,I all alone beweep my outcast state,And trouble deaf heaven with my bootless cries,And look upon myself, and curse my fate, When I am out of luck and...

Latest answer posted October 18, 2007, 12:32 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

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