Sonnet 18 Questions and Answers

Sonnet 18

William Shakespeare's Sonnet 18, "Shall I Compare Thee to a Summer's Day?" begins with a rhetorical question that the poet nevertheless proceeds to answer. The nature of the question is a clue to...

Latest answer posted March 18, 2020 3:55 pm UTC

4 educator answers

Sonnet 18

The first line of Shakespeare's Sonnet 18 appears to be a question: Shall I compare thee to a summer's day? Shakespeare doesn't ask, "May I," or "Can I," or "Would you mind if I," nor in any way...

Latest answer posted December 10, 2020 5:38 pm UTC

6 educator answers

Sonnet 18

In Sonnet 18, Shakespeare compares the beloved's beauty to a summer's day, much to the beloved's advantage. Although a summer's day may be very bright and beautiful, it won't last. Nor will the...

Latest answer posted January 21, 2021 11:30 am UTC

4 educator answers

Sonnet 18

At first glance, the mood and tone of Shakespeare's Sonnet 18 is one of deep love and affection. It is highly sentimental and full of feeling. This sonnet may seem at first to simply praise the...

Latest answer posted March 23, 2020 1:40 am UTC

4 educator answers

Sonnet 18

In the last two lines of Shakespeare's Sonnet 18, the speaker argues that his beloved will be immortalized by the poem, that they will live on in the minds of men long after they have died. This...

Latest answer posted December 26, 2020 10:37 am UTC

4 educator answers

Sonnet 18

A metaphor is a comparison that does not use the words "like" or "as." The overarching metaphor in this sonnet is that the speaker's beloved is better than the summer's day they are compared to. In...

Latest answer posted December 13, 2020 11:11 am UTC

5 educator answers

Sonnet 18

Shakespeare wrote the following four lines in iambic pentameter. As the previous educator has explained, "iambic pentameter" refers to five metrical feet of unstressed and stressed syllables per...

Latest answer posted February 7, 2017 9:32 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Sonnet 18

Shakespeare wrote "Sonnet 18" to commemorate and preserve his lover's youth and beauty and make them last forever; by comparing his lover to a warm and pleasant summer's day, Shakespeare showcases...

Latest answer posted January 24, 2021 11:20 am UTC

4 educator answers

Sonnet 18

It's from Sonnet 18, and all it means is that sometimes the sun ("the eye of heaven") shines with too much heat. Here's the passage: Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines, And often is his...

Latest answer posted February 3, 2009 6:45 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Sonnet 18

I can only come up with one meaning of the word "lines," and it is that the word refers to the lines of the poem, in which the speaker immortalizes his lover's beauty. Beauty and youth eventually...

Latest answer posted August 7, 2018 2:43 am UTC

2 educator answers

Sonnet 18

Sonnet 18 is a poem in which the speaker praises the beloved's beauty by comparing it to a summer's day. By the second line of the poem, though, we know that the beloved's qualities far exceed the...

Latest answer posted January 17, 2018 3:29 am UTC

2 educator answers

Sonnet 18

In addition to the other answers, this poem also makes use of apostrophe. Apostrophe is when the speaker of the poem addresses someone who is absent, an abstract idea (e.g., love, time), or an...

Latest answer posted September 13, 2017 11:24 am UTC

3 educator answers

Sonnet 18

Most sonnets are love poems; at least, we can say this about Shakespearean sonnets. So there must be something particular about this sonnet that makes it so memorable. Perhaps it is something about...

Latest answer posted July 7, 2020 12:33 pm UTC

5 educator answers

Sonnet 18

Shakespeare's famous Sonnet 18 contains several fine examples of personification (the application of human characteristics to nonhuman beings or objects). In line 3, for instance, the winds are...

Latest answer posted April 12, 2021 1:44 pm UTC

5 educator answers

Sonnet 18

When the poet asks whether he should compare his beloved to a summer's day, the word "compare" connotes observing both similarities and differences. The poet goes on to note the differences between...

Latest answer posted April 29, 2016 10:04 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Sonnet 18

The main purpose of Shakespeare's Sonnet 18 is embodied in the end couplet: So long as men can breathe or eyes can see,So long lives this and this gives life to thee. The sonneteer's purpose is...

Latest answer posted July 5, 2011 1:08 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Sonnet 18

In this sonnet "Shall I compare thee to a summer's day" Shakespeare compares an unnamed woman to a beautiful summer day. The woman comes out favorably in the comparison because sometimes the sun...

Latest answer posted April 30, 2015 12:21 am UTC

2 educator answers

Sonnet 18

In Sonnet XVIII by William Shakespeare, the use of "eye of heaven" is a figure of speech known as metonymy, the substitution of something closely related for the thing actually meant. With the sun...

Latest answer posted January 6, 2011 3:13 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Sonnet 18

The speaker wonders whether it would be appropriate to compare his love to a summer day, and then proceeds to outline the ways in which she actually exceeds it. First, he says that a summer day is...

Latest answer posted July 30, 2018 2:48 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Sonnet 18

Shakespeare uses personification, punning, alliteration, and antithesis in this line, showing the richness of his technique. In personification, a non-human object or an abstract quality is given...

Latest answer posted April 9, 2017 11:36 am UTC

2 educator answers

Sonnet 18

A figure of speech is a useful tool in literature, and introduces an inferred meaning into a description other than the literal interpretation. This allows for vivid descriptions and visual images...

Latest answer posted July 21, 2015 5:39 am UTC

2 educator answers

Sonnet 18

The speaker of Shakespeare's "Sonnet 18" compares his loved one and a summer day and finds the summer day to be lacking. In the first four lines of the poem the speaker identifies three...

Latest answer posted July 16, 2019 2:13 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Sonnet 18

You need to read the line in context and not separate from the rest of the poem. That said, here is the full text of the sonnet:Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?Thou art more lovely and more...

Latest answer posted February 13, 2008 10:09 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Sonnet 18

Shakespeare's Sonnet 18 is ultimately about the poet's belief that his "eternal lines to time" (this poem) will allow the person he is speaking to to live forever. He claims in the final couplet...

Latest answer posted March 2, 2011 10:24 am UTC

1 educator answer

Sonnet 18

When Shakespeare argues that his beloved is more lovely than a summer's day in Sonnet 18, one thing he is thinking of is how short lived summer is. He points out that "summer's lease hath all too...

Latest answer posted April 13, 2012 2:18 am UTC

1 educator answer

Sonnet 18

Sonnet 18 forms part of the "Fair Youth" sequence of Shakespeare's sonnets and is similar in theme to several others within this sequence (sonnets 1–126). The speaker expresses his strong feelings...

Latest answer posted February 3, 2018 9:04 am UTC

2 educator answers

Sonnet 18

There are several lines in Shakespeare's Sonnet 18 that refer to his beloved's mortality. However, Shakespeare argues in his concluding couplet that he is making his beloved immortal through his...

Latest answer posted April 13, 2012 1:18 am UTC

2 educator answers

Sonnet 18

The problem in sonnet 18 is that everything in nature dies. The poet wants to find some great metaphor to compare his love to, but none of the traditional metaphors work. Why? Because everything in...

Latest answer posted October 13, 2007 5:03 am UTC

3 educator answers

Sonnet 18

In Shakespeare's Sonnet 18 ("Shall I compare thee to a summer's day"), the poet is comparing the subject of the poem with nature. Though the summer is a beautiful time, the object of the poet's...

Latest answer posted February 17, 2011 3:41 am UTC

2 educator answers

Sonnet 18

Although the line is often cited as an example of personification, that is actually an impossibility. The reference to "death" is noting an action of the living, and since "death" is the ceasing of...

Latest answer posted August 10, 2008 2:11 am UTC

2 educator answers

Sonnet 18

In this line, Death is seen as an actual entity (as in the Grim Reaper), capable of emotions such as pride. So, the poet says, this entity will not be able to "brag," because the subject of the...

Latest answer posted May 18, 2018 5:04 am UTC

2 educator answers

Sonnet 18

The general idea of this sonnet is that the narrator is comparing his beloved to something that most people would argue is beautiful and amazing. That thing is a summer's day, and the narrator's...

Latest answer posted January 22, 2019 11:25 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Sonnet 18

A critical analysis of Shakespeare's Sonnet 18 discusses everything from structure to rhetorical figure of speech word schemes. The structure is that of an English, or Shakespearean, 14 line...

Latest answer posted January 15, 2011 1:34 am UTC

1 educator answer

Sonnet 18

Shakespeare's Sonnet 18 comes close to being an extended simile, without ever quite being one. A poem which said "You are like a summer's day, in the following ways" would clearly be a simile on...

Latest answer posted June 26, 2020 11:48 am UTC

5 educator answers

Sonnet 18

You've said you're comfortable with the concepts of consonance and assonance, but it might be useful just to recap. Both of these are sound devices, which can be used to create a sense of internal...

Latest answer posted July 15, 2019 11:11 am UTC

3 educator answers

Sonnet 18

Shakespeare's "Sonnet 18" is written in the style of a Petrarchan sonnet. In a Petrarchan sonnet, the first eight lines pose a problem or a question, and the last six lines offer a solution or...

Latest answer posted September 19, 2019 9:06 pm UTC

3 educator answers

Sonnet 18

The denotation, the literal meaning, of "temperate" means moderate and not excessive to one degree or another. In other words, the speaker is saying that his beloved is like the baby bear's...

Latest answer posted September 25, 2015 3:59 am UTC

1 educator answer

Sonnet 18

In my mind, the theme of the Sonnet is a reverence of love or feelings of emotions from the speaker to another element. Certainly, this could be the love of the creation of art or the ability to...

Latest answer posted February 9, 2010 8:26 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Sonnet 18

Shakespeare's famous Sonnet 18, "Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?" begins with a false comparison, and the poem goes on to indicate why the comparison of the beloved to a summer's day is...

Latest answer posted March 30, 2018 4:15 pm UTC

3 educator answers

Sonnet 18

Let’s start with a quick review of how rhyme schemes are notated. First, we identify the final syllable in the first line of the poem, and label that sound “a”:1. Of this World's theatre in which...

Latest answer posted July 8, 2016 9:13 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Sonnet 18

There are several reasons why Shakespeare is portraying the sun as inconstant in Sonnet 18. The first reasons are literal, as we see in the lines: Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines, And...

Latest answer posted January 26, 2016 3:05 am UTC

2 educator answers

Sonnet 18

This poem has one dominating metaphor in which the beauty of the speaker's beloved is compared to an "eternal summer." She comes out ahead, obviously, as her beauty will "never fade" while summer's...

Latest answer posted June 27, 2019 2:12 am UTC

2 educator answers

Sonnet 18

Shakespeare glorifies his friend in two ways, as evidenced in the structure of the poem. In the first six lines, he compares his friend to a summer day and explains how summer is less perfect and...

Latest answer posted June 17, 2009 1:18 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Sonnet 18

The heroic couplet is the summation of the argument presented in Sonnet 18 by Shakespeare; in its grammar and meaning it is complete: So long as men can breathe, or eyes can see,/So long lives...

Latest answer posted May 23, 2009 10:29 am UTC

2 educator answers

Sonnet 18

The word "this" in line 14 of Shakespeare's Sonnet 18 refers to the poem itself. Sonnet 18 is one of several sonnets in which the speaker proclaims that his love for his friend and his friend's...

Latest answer posted February 1, 2012 11:57 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Sonnet 18

Much critical analysis has been done with the whole sonnet sequence, and while there are no definitive answers, an interesting theory is that he is writing what we know as the first 75+ sonnets in...

Latest answer posted October 7, 2010 3:41 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Sonnet 18

The sonnet opens with the question "Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?" The subsequent 13 lines do, in fact, compare the beloved to a summer's day; thus, the question is answered...

Latest answer posted December 22, 2016 4:10 am UTC

2 educator answers

Sonnet 18

Like the summer's day the poet describes, which eventually must come to an end after only a fairly brief time, the beloved addressed in the poem is not literally immortal. He, too, has a "lease" on...

Latest answer posted November 22, 2018 12:44 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Sonnet 18

Both "Sonnet 18" and act 2, scene 2 of Romeo and Juliet contain declarations and explanations of love. Also, both employ nature-filled figurative language. However, in Romeo and Juliet, the reader...

Latest answer posted June 6, 2020 2:23 am UTC

3 educator answers

Sonnet 18

One of the ways in which Shakespeare uses language for effect is by employing words with specific connotations. The language the speaker uses to describe the person he loves is overwhelmingly...

Latest answer posted June 29, 2020 1:37 pm UTC

3 educator answers

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