Sonnet 14 Questions and Answers

Sonnet 14

To add a thought to Chelsea's answer (below), tricks aren't only deceptive (or persuasive); they're also short. Think about other uses of the word trick—we played a trick on him, she did a magic...

Latest answer posted July 2, 2016 2:25 am UTC

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Sonnet 14

I just read through this poem several times and...I think I agree with you. While literature brings us the wisdom of the world, we must recall that it is human wisdom and prone to error. She seems...

Latest answer posted October 25, 2015 9:05 pm UTC

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Sonnet 14

Sonnet 14 is structured like a Petrarchan sonnet, which is to say that it's split into two sections: the octave (the first eight lines) and the sestet (the last six lines). The octave's rhyme...

Latest answer posted July 2, 2016 1:43 am UTC

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Sonnet 14

We cannot understand the meaning of the lines that you are asking about unless we understand the theme of the whole sonnet. We must also look at the previous line to understand the context in...

Latest answer posted August 15, 2015 10:05 pm UTC

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Sonnet 14

The speaker of the poem wants her lover to love her for the sake of love itself. The speaker is very clear that she does not want to be loved because she has a great smile or because she had a...

Latest answer posted August 21, 2015 8:26 pm UTC

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Sonnet 14

The last two lines of "Sonnet 14" are an example of what's called a metaphor. This is a figure of speech which is applied to an object or action to which it is not literally applicable. In lines...

Latest answer posted September 26, 2018 8:56 am UTC

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Sonnet 14

The speaker asks that her lover will love her only for the sake of that love, and not because of her smile or the way she talks, for example, because these things can change and she does not want...

Latest answer posted September 15, 2019 6:19 pm UTC

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Sonnet 14

Certain emotions and thoughts, even ideas, may easily change the minds of the lovers and then love may be lost. The speaker of Sonnet 14 by Elizabeth Barrett Browning urges the lover to not feel...

Latest answer posted June 10, 2016 8:30 pm UTC

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