Sonnet 130 Questions and Answers

Sonnet 130

Shakespeare relies on strong visual imagery to deliver the similes in Sonnet 130. These devices ultimately demonstrate the type of love he shares with his beloved. For the majority of this sonnet,...

Latest answer posted December 3, 2020 11:34 am UTC

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Sonnet 130

Imagery is description using any of the five senses of sight, sound, taste, touch, or smell. The imagery in Shakespeare's "Sonnet 130" pokes fun at or parodies the conventionalized love imagery...

Latest answer posted July 5, 2020 11:42 am UTC

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Sonnet 130

When you state the tone of a piece, it is almost always up for debate, so as long as you choose something that makes sense, and you defend it well, you are usually OK. I would state the the tone is...

Latest answer posted March 1, 2011 12:32 am UTC

2 educator answers

Sonnet 130

In Shakespeare's “Sonnet 130,” the speaker takes a roundabout approach to describing his beloved. He uses every cliché he can think of but says that his mistress is none of them. Her eyes are...

Latest answer posted March 21, 2021 4:57 pm UTC

4 educator answers

Sonnet 130

The main idea in most of Shakespeare's sonnets is presented by the final two lines, the rhyming couplet. Many sonnets take love as its subject and use hyperbole or metaphors that compare a woman's...

Latest answer posted August 24, 2018 8:57 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Sonnet 130

The subject matter of the poem is, simply, the speaker's mistress and the speaker's love for her. Most sonnets are written about love, but they often make use of unrealistic comparisons meant to...

Latest answer posted October 17, 2017 11:43 am UTC

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Sonnet 130

Literary devices are techniques used by writers to enhance their work by creating special effects. To achieve this, authors use figures of speech such as metaphors, similes, personification, and...

Latest answer posted July 28, 2017 9:09 am UTC

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Sonnet 130

Shakespeare's "Sonnet 130" has often been called something along the lines of a "winsome trifle" designed to be merely funny, which it is, but Shakespeare is also gently satirizing the conventions...

Latest answer posted February 21, 2016 4:45 pm UTC

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Sonnet 130

Shakespeare uses imagery to convey his impressions of his mistress. For example, he says that her eyes do not resemble the sun and that the color of her breasts is "dun." He writes that "black...

Latest answer posted June 5, 2017 12:53 am UTC

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Sonnet 130

Sonnet 130 is one of Shakespeare's well-known sonnets also called My Mistress' Eyes. He popularized the Elizabethan sonnet which has a different emphasis from the original sonnet form which...

Latest answer posted July 14, 2015 1:23 pm UTC

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Sonnet 130

The figurative language in Sonnet 130 consists of a series of modified and reversed similes, in which the poet emphasizes how unlike his mistress’s attributes are to various tropes of romantic...

Latest answer posted May 26, 2020 3:04 am UTC

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Sonnet 130

The tone of this sonnet is down-to-earth and pragmatic, and rather wry. It paints a picture of the poet’s beloved in realistic terms rather than indulging in the kind of hyperbole that love poets,...

Latest answer posted April 11, 2013 3:42 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Sonnet 130

Snow: The speaker, defying the conventions of traditional love poetry, claims his mistress's skin is not as white as snow. Roses: This may be the most significant symbol. Roses are a staple of...

Latest answer posted November 29, 2018 4:16 am UTC

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Sonnet 130

This line literally means that his mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun. They are not made of the same material. They do not shine as bright; this can be taken metaphorically as well. But this...

Latest answer posted April 28, 2016 7:30 pm UTC

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Sonnet 130

In this particular line, the speaker is emphasizing his mistress's down-to-earth qualities, as he has been doing right throughout the poem. We already know that her eyes are nothing like the sun;...

Latest answer posted February 16, 2020 10:38 am UTC

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Sonnet 130

Central to understanding this brilliant sonnet is the way that Shakespeare is actually poking fun at the somewhat hyperbolic and exaggerated descriptions of the idealised female of conventional...

Latest answer posted March 27, 2011 12:40 am UTC

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Sonnet 130

When we think of the word mood, we associate it with the emotion produced in a literary text through the choice of words and content. Of course, a mood can change as a text progresses and so often...

Latest answer posted April 3, 2011 7:39 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Sonnet 130

It is better to truly know someone and love him or her than to "love" someone you don't really know. Shakespeare's sonnet 130 takes on the numerous love poets before him who exaggerated the...

Latest answer posted May 26, 2007 5:05 am UTC

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Sonnet 130

This sonnet is among the most famous because of Shakespeare's mocking of the conventional poetic praises of a mistress's beauty. He uses parody and satire to "describe" his love. Remember that to...

Latest answer posted January 15, 2018 11:21 pm UTC

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Sonnet 130

Shakespeare's Sonnet CXXX mocks the Elizabethan conventions of poetry that extolled ideal love as well as satirizing the Petrarchan sonnets that compared the object of love to Nature in hyperbolic...

Latest answer posted April 27, 2014 11:27 pm UTC

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Sonnet 130

In Sonnet 130, Shakespeare compares certain physical features of his beloved with a number of beautiful things drawn from the natural world. On the face of it, each comparison appears far from...

Latest answer posted June 12, 2021 7:41 am UTC

1 educator answer

Sonnet 130

In Shakespeare's Sonnet 130, the Petrarchan elements are few since the development of the English sonnet led away from Petrarch's structure and expression of ideas. One Petrarchan element is...

Latest answer posted March 24, 2011 12:59 am UTC

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Sonnet 130

In general, the speaker describes a number of things that are typically thought to be beautiful and then explains that his mistress's qualities are not as conventionally beautiful as these objects....

Latest answer posted August 16, 2020 12:15 pm UTC

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Sonnet 130

The literal meaning of Sonnet 130 is that the speaker loves his mistress even though she is not aesthetically perfect. The speaker catalogs a number of ways in which his mistress falls short...

Latest answer posted September 14, 2016 6:10 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Sonnet 130

Sonnet 130 is an ironical sonnet and, for some, among his least appealing. While sonnets conventionally speak of love for a beloved who is graced with praiseworthy charms and beauties but who are...

Latest answer posted January 19, 2012 4:12 am UTC

1 educator answer

Sonnet 130

In this sonnet Shakespeare is parodying the conventional comparisons of traditional love poetry (and specifically, of Petrarchan sonnets). The speaker says that of course his "mistress' eyes are...

Latest answer posted March 3, 2019 3:22 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Sonnet 130

No poet or playwright has received more attention than that of William Shakespeare, and for good reason. A critical appreciation of his "Sonnet 130" shows his genius. The poem in form is just like...

Latest answer posted October 29, 2013 2:55 am UTC

1 educator answer

Sonnet 130

"My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun" is a parody of a blazon conceit, a figurative device frequently used by Elizabethan poets. A conceit in general is a witty, fanciful figurative device...

Latest answer posted February 1, 2012 7:14 am UTC

1 educator answer

Sonnet 130

The speaker spends the whole sonnet making what appear to be rather unflattering comparisons between the beauty of his lover and objects of nature such as coral, snow, and roses. Other poets may...

Latest answer posted October 4, 2018 5:27 am UTC

2 educator answers

Sonnet 130

The speaker compares his mistress to objects in nature. But, unlike many poets who compare their mistress as having qualities that equal the beauty he sees in nature, the speaker in this sonnet...

Latest answer posted November 16, 2010 6:47 am UTC

1 educator answer

Sonnet 130

The speaker begins the sonnet by declaring that the eyes of the woman he loves are "nothing like the sun." He also says that "coral is far more red than her lips' red." Ostensibly it may seem here...

Latest answer posted May 6, 2021 11:29 am UTC

1 educator answer

Sonnet 130

The tone and meaning of William Shakespeare’s sonnet 130 (“My mistress’s eyes are nothing like the sun”) are open to interpretation, as is especially the case with almost anything written by...

Latest answer posted January 4, 2012 1:22 am UTC

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Sonnet 130

By the time that Shakespeare came to write Sonnet 130, the traditional Petrarchan love sonnet was starting to look pretty worn-out. It seemed that poets, even the very best ones, had exhausted all...

Latest answer posted April 27, 2020 11:56 am UTC

1 educator answer

Sonnet 130

This is a great question, and it just so happens to be one of Shakespeare's most famous sonnets of all time!In short, the moral of the sonnet (as with most of his sonnets) is summed up in the...

Latest answer posted August 29, 2011 5:29 am UTC

1 educator answer

Sonnet 130

In line 11 and 12 of Shakespeare's sonnet 13, Shakespeare writes: I grant I never saw a goddess go;My mistress, when she walks, treads on the ground: He is suggesting that his subject of the...

Latest answer posted February 20, 2019 9:59 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Sonnet 130

"Conflict" is an interesting choice of words—I assume you are referring to the difficulties with which the poet is struggling as he composes this sonnet. Shakespeare is here deliberately utilizing...

Latest answer posted November 22, 2018 11:08 am UTC

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Sonnet 130

A blazon in literature is a word that normally refers to a lyric poem that focuses on the speaker's beloved and where his or her virtues and beauty are listed one by one. If you want to see another...

Latest answer posted December 12, 2011 6:36 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Sonnet 130

Gender is obviously a significant issue in William Shakespeare’s sonnet 130 (“My misstress’ eyes are nothing like the sun”). Gender roles are important to the poem in a number of different ways,...

Latest answer posted November 22, 2011 8:08 am UTC

1 educator answer

Sonnet 130

Sonnet 130 expresses the speaker's strong feelings that one does not need to exaggerate or make false comparisons about one's lover's beauty in order to flatter them. True love does not require...

Latest answer posted March 15, 2019 4:10 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Sonnet 130

In Shakespeare's Sonnet 130, the speaker parodies traditional love poetry by naming all of the things his love is not. Traditional love poetry that Shakespeare is lightly ridiculing uses hyperbole...

Latest answer posted March 28, 2010 12:19 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Sonnet 130

Conventional or traditional poetry is characterized by a regular meter or rhythm, a specific rhyme scheme, and often the same number of lines in stanzas or lines that have the same or similar...

Latest answer posted December 9, 2020 3:55 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Sonnet 130

I'm going to follow amy-lepore's thread here and say the answer is a qualified "yes". The key is in whether the idealized Renaissance beauty and the actual Renaissance beauty are the same women....

Latest answer posted May 26, 2007 11:27 am UTC

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Sonnet 130

This sonnet is about loving someone in spite of their shortcomings. Bill spends the majority of the poem talking about his loves flaws. He compares her lips to coral rather than something lovely...

Latest answer posted August 28, 2009 12:20 am UTC

1 educator answer

Sonnet 130

Iambic pentameter is a pattern of stressed and unstressed syllables in a meter of poetry. An iamb is a foot of unstressed/stressed syllables. Pentameter means there are a 5 feet of...

Latest answer posted May 10, 2013 3:43 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Sonnet 130

I agree with the first post, but I'm not sure how much it really answers the question. To me, the details that most make the poem memorable (by going against the typical hyperbole about women's...

Latest answer posted October 31, 2012 2:47 am UTC

2 educator answers

Sonnet 130

In Shakespeare's Sonnet 130, he is listing the attributes of the woman he loves, but not in a necessarily positive light. He speaks of her looks (her eyes, her lips, etc.) and points out what they...

Latest answer posted August 16, 2011 1:18 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Sonnet 130

Both sonnets address the subject of lackluster love: love that continues even when the beauteous luster of the beloved has worn off ... or was never there. The thematic approach Shakespeare takes...

Latest answer posted April 11, 2013 6:59 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Sonnet 130

Shakespeare's primary meter through all of the sonnets is iambic pentameter. Each iambic "foot" is made up of one unstressed syllable followed by one stressed syllable. In a perfect line of...

Latest answer posted October 21, 2011 12:23 am UTC

1 educator answer

Sonnet 130

In the first three lines of Shakespeare's Sonnet 130, the three objects that the speaker compares to his lover are the sun, coral, and snow. In this ironic twist on a love poem, the speaker uses...

Latest answer posted August 5, 2019 6:39 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Sonnet 130

A motif is a recurring subject, idea, or theme. Sonnet 130, which is devoted to the dark lady, emphasizes her coloring, so colors would be a motif in the poem. As a matter of fact, the first 5...

Latest answer posted October 4, 2011 7:35 am UTC

1 educator answer

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