Sonnet 116 Questions and Answers

Sonnet 116

Sonnet 116, "Let me not to the marriage of true minds," is one of the most well-known of William Shakespeare's sonnets. Sonnet 116 was published with the other sonnets in 1604, but these aren't the...

Latest answer posted December 6, 2020 4:00 pm UTC

6 educator answers

Sonnet 116

Shakespeare's Sonnet 116 is a testament to the abiding power of love. These lines mean that time cannot change love. Father Time, the personification of time, is often pictured with a scythe, or a...

Latest answer posted June 22, 2019 12:19 pm UTC

3 educator answers

Sonnet 116

The topic of Sonnet 116 is love. The poem is a rumination on love, if you will. Stanza by stanza, here's a paraphrase: Don't let me consider anything that would get in the way of a marriage...

Latest answer posted March 29, 2010 11:22 am UTC

2 educator answers

Sonnet 116

In Sonnet 116, Shakespeare employs synecdoche in lines 1-2: "Let me not to the marriage of true minds / Admit impediments." Synecdoche is the use of a part of something to stand in for the whole...

Latest answer posted August 14, 2016 4:51 pm UTC

3 educator answers

Sonnet 116

Sonnet 116 claims that true love is not based on practicality, pragmatism, or any other material standard, but rather that true love exists beyond these concerns, beyond change ("alterations") and...

Latest answer posted April 12, 2019 8:29 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Sonnet 116

The figure of speech (also called poetic device or literary device) in the following line of Shakespeare's "Sonnet 116" is personification. Let me not to the marriage of true minds....

Latest answer posted August 13, 2011 12:05 am UTC

1 educator answer

Sonnet 116

In Sonnet 116 Shakespeare uses literary devices like personification, alliteration, and metaphor to convey the idea that even as beauty fades with time, true love remains strong. Personification is...

Latest answer posted May 18, 2021 7:26 pm UTC

3 educator answers

Sonnet 116

With these words, Shakespeare is trying to justify the view of true love that he's spent the rest of the poem expressing. He's told us that true love is unchanging, that it is a timeless ideal that...

Latest answer posted September 30, 2020 10:36 am UTC

3 educator answers

Sonnet 116

In Sonnet 116 by William Shakespeare, the poet writes about the permanence and unchanging nature of real love. He begins by stating that there should be no impediments, or barriers, to two people...

Latest answer posted May 1, 2021 5:06 pm UTC

4 educator answers

Sonnet 116

Sonnet 116 is one of Shakespeare's most famous sonnets, concerned as it is with unconditional love which does not alter "when it alteration finds." The poem is full of imagery, beginning with the...

Latest answer posted June 8, 2018 8:53 am UTC

2 educator answers

Sonnet 116

He is talking about Time, personified in this poem as being largely congruent with Death. In brief strokes, the speaker depicts the figure of Time as carrying a sickle, an accessory which...

Latest answer posted August 6, 2018 8:34 am UTC

2 educator answers

Sonnet 116

This is a great sonnet for looking at how structure is used to help create and support meaning. This is a classic English sonnet structure -- 3 quatrains and a final, rhyming couplet to provide...

Latest answer posted December 13, 2010 10:45 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Sonnet 116

In this sonnet, the star is functioning as something that is constant, something a wanderer could look to in order to get his bearings and know where he is. Without the aid of modern navigational...

Latest answer posted July 22, 2018 11:21 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Sonnet 116

"Love's not Time's fool" captures the controlling metaphor of this Shakespearean sonnet as all other lines reinforce this sentiment: "Love is not love" if it changes with the corrosive power of...

Latest answer posted October 28, 2009 3:32 am UTC

3 educator answers

Sonnet 116

The subject of the two sonnets is different. “Sonnet 116” is a love poem, and “Sonnet 29” is more self-centered. The tone of “Sonnet 116” is “I love you,” and the tone of “Sonnet 29” is “I am...

Latest answer posted March 28, 2013 10:11 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Sonnet 116

In "Sonnet 116" by William Shakespeare, one of the most famous and often-quoted of the sonnets, the poet reflects upon what real love is. He emphasizes that there should be no impediments, or...

Latest answer posted March 9, 2020 2:15 am UTC

1 educator answer

Sonnet 116

Shakespeare compares Love to many things, giving it many dimensions and potentialities and responsibilities and capacities. It cannot be altered, even when it comes upon changes, perhaps in those...

Latest answer posted November 13, 2017 12:18 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Sonnet 116

More than anything, Sonnet 116 is about true love, an everlasting love that does not alter. Shakespeare is positing an ideal, almost Platonic understanding of love, one that transcends the...

Latest answer posted February 3, 2018 11:27 am UTC

2 educator answers

Sonnet 116

In "Sonnet 116," Shakespeare attempts to tell us what love is, and just as crucially, what it is not. In terms of the latter, it does not "admit impediments." That is to say it is utterly perfect...

Latest answer posted November 10, 2019 8:24 am UTC

1 educator answer

Sonnet 116

In Sonnet 116, Shakespeare never uses the word "polar" star, but it is what he means when he refers to a star that is an "ever-fixed mark" and "the star to every wand'ring bark [ship at sea]." This...

Latest answer posted July 18, 2019 7:20 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Sonnet 116

Shakespeare's "Sonnet 116," like 115 and 117, discusses the nature of true love in terms of constancy, immutability, and alteration (of the loved one). Shakespeare chiefly uses extended metaphors,...

Latest answer posted November 14, 2019 4:00 pm UTC

3 educator answers

Sonnet 116

A symbol is created when something an object has both literal and figurative meaning. A metaphor, on the other hand, has only figurative meaning, and it compares two unalike things. In this sonnet,...

Latest answer posted July 7, 2019 10:49 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Sonnet 116

As the other educator has pointed out, there are no similes in Shakespeare's Sonnet 116; there are, however, metaphors. A simile compares two things by saying Thing One is like Thing Two, while a...

Latest answer posted May 18, 2018 8:16 am UTC

2 educator answers

Sonnet 116

The topic of Sonnet 116 is love. The poem is a rumination on love, if you will. Stanza by stanza, here's a paraphrase: Don't let me consider anything that would get in the way of a marriage...

Latest answer posted March 29, 2010 8:50 am UTC

2 educator answers

Sonnet 116

Love is presented as the meeting and coming together "of two minds," rather than two bodies or something else. Love is much more mental than it is physical. Further, a true lover does not seek to...

Latest answer posted November 27, 2018 12:41 am UTC

2 educator answers

Sonnet 116

The figurative language used in this poem is largely metaphorical. Shakespeare uses a number of metaphors to expound upon the idea of love as "an ever-fixed mark," something constant like a "star"...

Latest answer posted June 17, 2018 7:33 am UTC

2 educator answers

Sonnet 116

The trope of love without qualifications prevails throughout Shakespeare's Sonnet CXVI, a sonnet that also sees a reconciliation between the poet and his loved one. The love described in this...

Latest answer posted June 15, 2013 2:55 am UTC

1 educator answer

Sonnet 116

Whenever I think about writing a thesis statement for a paper I look at the literary work and list the things that I know for sure that I understand (because that is what I will cite as evidence...

Latest answer posted February 25, 2012 2:35 am UTC

1 educator answer

Sonnet 116

The first line of this sonnet reads, "Let me not to the marriage of true minds" (line 1). As a general rule, English or Shakespearean sonnets are composed using iambic pentameter (five feet per...

Latest answer posted July 24, 2016 5:55 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Sonnet 116

The theme of this famous sonnet concerns the transcendent nature of true love and how it overcomes any barriers or obstructions. True love, the speaker argues, does not change or alter with the...

Latest answer posted January 27, 2013 6:44 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Sonnet 116

"Sonnet 116" beautifully illustrates Shakespeare's view of love. Shakespeare begins the sonnet by telling the reader what love is not before shifting into what he believes it is. The first few...

Latest answer posted September 10, 2018 8:44 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Sonnet 116

According to the speaker of Sonnet 116, there are no barriers, or impediments, to love; not true love, at any rate. Love—that is to say, the "marriage of true minds"—cannot be altered. On the...

Latest answer posted December 26, 2019 10:48 am UTC

1 educator answer

Sonnet 116

The quote you have given could actually be used as the basis to discuss a number of Shakespeare's sonnets, which seem to place the passing of time in conflict with the beauty of the object of the...

Latest answer posted July 25, 2011 8:21 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Sonnet 116

As the title suggests, the poem argues that true love will not be impeded, changed or stopped by transitory circumstances. True love, implicitly opposed to lust or some shallower form of affection,...

Latest answer posted September 21, 2016 10:04 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Sonnet 116

The "marriage of true minds" is friendship. A reading of Shakespeare's sonnets will reinforce that Shakespeare often writes to his friend, especially in some of the earlier sonnets. Of course,...

Latest answer posted October 17, 2010 11:41 am UTC

2 educator answers

Sonnet 116

The poem known as Sonnet 116 is one of the most famous of William Shakespeare's sonnets. In it, the poet expresses the message that love is eternal and unchanging regardless of circumstances. It is...

Latest answer posted August 14, 2020 1:52 am UTC

1 educator answer

Sonnet 116

In his famous "Sonnet 116," William Shakespeare writes about the permanence, steadfastness, and reliability of true love. He emphasizes that real love does not alter or bend when it meets with...

Latest answer posted August 13, 2019 12:02 am UTC

1 educator answer

Sonnet 116

Given the fact that the Sonnet's focus is the description of love, I think that you could find much in it to serve as a figure of speech. In my mind, one of the strongest figures of speech would...

Latest answer posted December 11, 2009 9:16 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Sonnet 116

In this sonnet, the speaker expresses his faith in the bond between two people who truly love one another. Lines 2-4 draw a distinction between couples who "admit impediments" to their...

Latest answer posted June 10, 2019 2:12 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Sonnet 116

The majority of sonnets structurally include what is called a "turn," or a shift in focus or thought. Where this turn occurs in each sonnet of course varies, but what is interesting about this...

Latest answer posted November 27, 2010 9:32 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Sonnet 116

You have a good start with love being constant and consistently sublime. That is indeed what Sonnet 116 is all about. Check some of the Enotes links below; they should help. You can expand on the...

Latest answer posted May 24, 2012 7:58 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Sonnet 116

First, as stated in an earlier answer, we do not know what Shakespeare's personal feelings were about love. We do not have any existing diaries or letters in which he explicitly stated his personal...

Latest answer posted May 1, 2017 9:55 am UTC

2 educator answers

Sonnet 116

You asked two questions and so according to enotes regulations I have been forced to edit your question down to focus on just one question. This is arguably one of Shakespeare's most famous...

Latest answer posted November 25, 2010 9:55 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Sonnet 116

In this sonnet, William Shakespeare extols the characteristics of true love. Love doesn't change even when altering situations seem to warrant a change. It is a steady target, like the North Star...

Latest answer posted August 31, 2019 2:49 am UTC

1 educator answer

Sonnet 116

Sonnet CXVI (116) by Shakespeare is a succinct and beautiful expression of the speaker's concept of true love. In the context of the previous sonnets, the speaker puts aside his uncertainties and...

Latest answer posted December 26, 2017 8:45 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Sonnet 116

The rhyme scheme is typical of the English, or Shakespearean, sonnet: abab cdcd efef gg. This means that the last words in lines 1 and 3 rhyme (this is called end rhyme), the last words in lines 2...

Latest answer posted September 26, 2018 12:13 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Sonnet 116

Sonnet 116 is a beautiful expression of the enduring nature of true love in the face of an endlessly changing world. Figurative language, or imagery, is any word or set of words that the poem uses...

Latest answer posted March 15, 2019 11:41 pm UTC

3 educator answers

Sonnet 116

In the second and third lines of this sonnet, the speaker declares that "Love is not love / Which alters when it alteration finds." In other words, according to the speaker, true love is love which...

Latest answer posted December 24, 2019 10:43 am UTC

1 educator answer

Sonnet 116

In Sonnet 116, Shakespeare asserts true love’s constancy and permanence through poetic devices including allusion, metaphor, and paradox. He opens with Let me not to the marriage of true...

Latest answer posted March 26, 2021 3:50 am UTC

1 educator answer

Sonnet 116

I like your theory on the eye-rhyme: Shakespeare telling us that what we see as harmony may not really be so. That said, as an English English teacher, there is a stronger case for the...

Latest answer posted March 24, 2012 6:05 am UTC

2 educator answers

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