Songs of Innocence and of Experience Questions and Answers

Songs of Innocence and of Experience

"The Lamb" represents Blake's vision of heaven as an orderly place firmly under God's authority. The speaker of the poem, who we discover in the second stanza is a child, is addressing a lamb and...

Latest answer posted January 27, 2021, 11:09 am (UTC)

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Songs of Innocence and of Experience

The lamb and tiger are symbolic of the state of man before and after the fall from grace in the garden of Eden, or perhaps the lamb is more representative of a kind of purity of spirit or...

Latest answer posted March 13, 2020, 2:04 pm (UTC)

4 educator answers

Songs of Innocence and of Experience

In Songs of Innocence and of Experience, Blake explores these two sides of the human soul through two sections of poems. The first section features the poems of innocence, which are written from a...

Latest answer posted March 13, 2020, 12:04 pm (UTC)

4 educator answers

Songs of Innocence and of Experience

Both poems are alike in being narrated by a young chimney sweep and discussing the life a chimney sweep leads. Both show the misery of this life. However, in "The Chimney Sweeper" poem in Songs of...

Latest answer posted June 29, 2020, 1:35 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Songs of Innocence and of Experience

The major theme of this poem is that God both knows and feels all of our sorrows and pain, even as we feel them. God is described as smiling on everyone and everything and so hears even the wren's...

Latest answer posted October 5, 2019, 9:32 pm (UTC)

3 educator answers

Songs of Innocence and of Experience

"The Schoolboy" is about more than a child simply wishing he could be outside playing instead of at school, although this is part of the poem's meaning. The poet compares the children to caged...

Latest answer posted September 3, 2017, 1:02 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

Songs of Innocence and of Experience

"The School Boy" is a poem in six stanzas and is narrated by its subject. He begins by saying that he loves to wake up on a summer morning to the sounds of the birds singing and the hunter winding...

Latest answer posted December 6, 2020, 11:13 am (UTC)

4 educator answers

Songs of Innocence and of Experience

Lyricism is the expression of emotion in a compelling and lovely way. In "The Lamb," Blake conveys a child's purity and innocence using simple words and imagery. In the poem, we feel the innocent...

Latest answer posted February 4, 2019, 9:50 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

Songs of Innocence and of Experience

In Blake's poem, "The Lamb," from his Songs of Innocence, the poet explores the innocence of childhood and the benevolence of God framed within a pastoral setting. The child poses rhetorical...

Latest answer posted February 27, 2019, 3:34 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

Songs of Innocence and of Experience

In William Blake's Songs of Innocence and Experience, the poet connects the lamb, the child, and Christ through symbolism. Let's look at some examples of this. In “Introduction,” the speaker meets...

Latest answer posted January 16, 2021, 3:56 pm (UTC)

3 educator answers

Songs of Innocence and of Experience

William Blake wrote two poems entitled "The Nurse's Song." The first was published in his 1789 collection of poetry entitled Songs of Innocence, and the second was published in his 1794 collection...

Latest answer posted March 11, 2020, 7:14 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Songs of Innocence and of Experience

"The Lamb" and "The Tyger" are conceived by Blake as companion poems in his book Songs of Innocence and Experience. In the first stanza of "The Lamb," the speaker asks the lamb if he knows who made...

Latest answer posted June 29, 2019, 3:44 am (UTC)

3 educator answers

Songs of Innocence and of Experience

Blake uses very simple diction or word choice in this poem. It is written in plain, childlike English. Most of the words are one syllable, and none are more than two syllables. Even the two...

Latest answer posted August 12, 2018, 9:14 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Songs of Innocence and of Experience

William Blake's 1789 pastoral poem "The School Boy" is a poem about the negative sides and aspects of formal education. The speaker, the titular school boy, is a kid that dislikes school, or rather...

Latest answer posted August 9, 2021, 12:25 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Songs of Innocence and of Experience

In Songs of Innocence and Experience, William Blake presents both loving parents and parents who exploit their children. Let's look at examples of both. We'll begin with examples from Songs of...

Latest answer posted November 29, 2020, 9:09 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Songs of Innocence and of Experience

I have to say that it is very hard to ever define a literal meaning of a poem unless the poem includes footnotes the author alone has included regarding the meaning. All poetry is subjective- the...

Latest answer posted July 22, 2011, 6:36 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Songs of Innocence and of Experience

As with many of the poems in Blake's brilliant Songs of Innocence and Experience, there are two poems entitled "Nurse's Song," which although they possess similarities, are very different in terms...

Latest answer posted April 18, 2011, 8:46 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Songs of Innocence and of Experience

The concept of nature in the Songs of Innocence and the Songs of Experience is contrary to each other because the two collections present the "two contrary states of the human soul." The paired...

Latest answer posted January 13, 2020, 5:22 am (UTC)

3 educator answers

Songs of Innocence and of Experience

From the poem, we can also see that the speaker and the lamb coexist peaceably within their creator's realm. The speaker uses his conversation with the lamb to convey a message that all of us have...

Latest answer posted January 31, 2017, 1:28 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Songs of Innocence and of Experience

In "The Tyger," strong verbs include dare, aspire, seize, twist, grasp, threw down, clasp, and then smile. These verbs convey a feeling of aggression, and raise the question, if creation is the...

Latest answer posted July 24, 2016, 7:05 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

Songs of Innocence and of Experience

In Blake's "The Little Boy Lost," the concept of darkness is coupled with the image of a father who is not paying any attention to the needs of his lost child: The night was dark no father was...

Latest answer posted March 8, 2014, 12:28 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

Songs of Innocence and of Experience

William Blake's "The Lamb" is often studied opposite "The Tyger," showing contrasting images of God and Christ. In "The Lamb," readers are presented with a warm and gracious image of Christ through...

Latest answer posted May 19, 2019, 1:07 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

Songs of Innocence and of Experience

It's been observed by more than one commentator over the decades that Blake's illustrations do not fully live up to their corresponding poems. We don't have a way of knowing if this is because...

Latest answer posted January 23, 2020, 6:50 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Songs of Innocence and of Experience

In Songs of Innocence and of Experience, William Blake clearly includes some poems in which political and social constraints do not play a part. "Infant Joy" and "The Lamb" are two examples. In the...

Latest answer posted November 29, 2020, 8:47 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Songs of Innocence and of Experience

"The Echoing Green" is from William Blake's 1789 collection of poems called Songs of Innocence. The poem is Romantic in its simple diction, celebration of the simple lives lived close to the...

Latest answer posted July 21, 2019, 10:37 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

Songs of Innocence and of Experience

First, let us remember that this poem, as with so many of Blake's poems in his Songs of Innocence and Experience, are really meant to be studied alongside their counterparts. In this case, Blake...

Latest answer posted October 24, 2010, 9:26 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Songs of Innocence and of Experience

In William Blake's "The Lamb" from Songs of Innocence, the lamb symbolizes humankind. The poem's speaker asks in the first stanza, "Little Lamb who made thee," and offers imagery of "clothing of...

Latest answer posted February 24, 2019, 8:18 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

Songs of Innocence and of Experience

To compare these two poems is to compare the angelic and the miserable. Both, of course, have to do with the service on Holy Thursday which needs a bit of explanation for most first-time readers....

Latest answer posted May 7, 2009, 5:13 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Songs of Innocence and of Experience

The series of poems that seemingly oppose each other or at least discuss big questions in different ways that characterise this excellent collection of poems serve to present the two states of...

Latest answer posted September 2, 2011, 8:21 pm (UTC)

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Songs of Innocence and of Experience

In the "Introduction" toSongs of Innocence and Experience, the model of innocence, the child, asks to hear a song (poem) about a Lamb. The child and the lamb are two recurring images/models of...

Latest answer posted September 28, 2012, 4:50 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Songs of Innocence and of Experience

In "The Schoolboy," William Blake offers a meditation on nature, childhood, and education. From the start, the poem draws a sharp contrast between the natural world and the traditional classroom....

Latest answer posted June 19, 2019, 12:42 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Songs of Innocence and of Experience

In “The Little Black Boy,” Blake addresses racism and the slave trade through his complication of the black/white binary. Through examination of the oppression, the clear divide between the...

Latest answer posted September 25, 2018, 6:23 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Songs of Innocence and of Experience

This poem is about a baby being born into a world of poverty. It is taken from the collection of poetry entitled Songs of Innocence and of Experience. The poems in the first half of this collection...

Latest answer posted March 31, 2019, 8:24 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

Songs of Innocence and of Experience

William Blake's "Spring" uses lots of devices to create a simple, repetitive rhythm. For example, every line except for the final line of each stanza has three syllables, creating a regular...

Latest answer posted April 6, 2019, 5:18 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

Songs of Innocence and of Experience

"On Another's Sorrow" is actually a poem with a tone shift. The speaker begins the poem with a tone that is, well, sorrowful (borrowing the importance of the title). He notes that when we care...

Latest answer posted July 3, 2019, 6:00 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Songs of Innocence and of Experience

Both "The Little Black Boy" and "The Chimney Sweeper" are from Blake's Songs of Innocence. In both poems, small boys are exploited and have been conditioned to believe that they will one day be...

Latest answer posted May 19, 2019, 10:49 pm (UTC)

3 educator answers

Songs of Innocence and of Experience

The poem "Infant Joy" is a celebration of a new life. In the first stanza, the newborn baby, two days old, asserts that he or she is happy. Although she doesn't have an official name yet, her name...

Latest answer posted March 19, 2017, 4:27 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

Songs of Innocence and of Experience

In his fascinating book Psychological Types, psychoanalyst C. G. Jung refers to William Blake's assertion that human beings can be divided into two categories. Jung quotes from Blake's "The...

Latest answer posted June 10, 2014, 11:59 am (UTC)

4 educator answers

Songs of Innocence and of Experience

William Blake's poem "Infant Sorrow" is an eight-line poem taken from his collection Songs of Experience. The poem is written from the perspective of a baby being born into the world, which is...

Latest answer posted October 14, 2018, 3:51 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

Songs of Innocence and of Experience

William Blake's poem “The Echoing Green” begins with a spring morning on which the ringing bells compete with the singing of sky-lark and thrush in making a cheerful sound while sports are played...

Latest answer posted November 1, 2019, 5:07 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Songs of Innocence and of Experience

Blake's "The Lamb" and "The Tyger" are known as companion poems, with the first appearing in Blake's Songs of Innocence and the second appearing in Songs of Experience. The speaker of "The Lamb"...

Latest answer posted March 29, 2010, 1:13 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Songs of Innocence and of Experience

"Holy Thursday" rightly belongs in Blake's Songs of Innocence, for the children are seen as angelic: they are "flowers" and "lambs," while with "radiance" they are "raising their innocent hands."...

Latest answer posted April 27, 2009, 10:27 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Songs of Innocence and of Experience

The second stanza reads: So sung a little Clod of Clay Trodden with the cattle's feet, But a Pebble of the brook Warbled out these metres meet A 'strong' image in this instance would be 'Clod of...

Latest answer posted September 16, 2015, 4:00 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Songs of Innocence and of Experience

Exploitation can refer to taking advantage of people, to treating them as if they were objects instead of human beings, and to using them for one's own profit or benefit without considering their...

Latest answer posted November 1, 2020, 8:20 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Songs of Innocence and of Experience

The main theme of Blake's poem, one of Blake's Songs of Innocence, is that black people and white people might have different skin colors, but they are equally children of God. As the poem states:...

Latest answer posted March 22, 2019, 11:29 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Songs of Innocence and of Experience

Since William Blake's Songs of Experience are best understood when compared to the corresponding Songs of Innocence, one should first read Introduction to Songs of Innocence before attempting a...

Latest answer posted June 9, 2019, 2:23 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

Songs of Innocence and of Experience

Blake's poem "The Lamb" has some very strong parallels to another Blake poem, "The Tyger." Both poems appear in Blake's work, "Songs of Innocence" and "Songs of Experience." "The Lamb" represents...

Latest answer posted August 8, 2009, 12:49 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Songs of Innocence and of Experience

William Blake's use of symbols in Songs of Innocence and Experience are multi-faceted and complex. Similar symbols recur throughout both halves of the text, and Blake uses these reoccurring symbols...

Latest answer posted August 14, 2019, 7:32 pm (UTC)

3 educator answers

Songs of Innocence and of Experience

Childhood is a recurring motif in the Songs of Innocence and the Songs of Experience. In general terms, Blake presents childhood in contemporary England as being associated with exploitation,...

Latest answer posted June 29, 2020, 1:14 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Songs of Innocence and of Experience

On one level, "Songs of Innocence" refers to an understanding about being in the world. Blake sees children as embodying the condition of consciousness where there is a pure exploration of...

Latest answer posted November 28, 2013, 12:34 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

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