Soliloquy of the Spanish Cloister Questions and Answers

Soliloquy of the Spanish Cloister

The narrator's character is revealed throughout the poem by his attitude towards Brother Lawrence. Gr-r-r-there go, my heart's abhorrence!: Is rage and hatred an appropriate attitude of a monk...

Latest answer posted October 4, 2011 11:23 am UTC

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Soliloquy of the Spanish Cloister

The Solliloquy is (one of my absolutely personal favorite poems) not as much a "dramatic monologue" thought it could be considered that since that is Browning's style. I would just stick to it...

Latest answer posted November 16, 2009 6:19 pm UTC

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Soliloquy of the Spanish Cloister

Definitions from Random House Dictionary (at Dictionary.com) envy–noun1. a feeling of discontent or covetousness with regard to another's advantages, success, possessions,covetous–adjective1....

Latest answer posted January 27, 2010 7:43 am UTC

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Soliloquy of the Spanish Cloister

In the “Soliloquy of the Spanish Cloister,” one monk is expressing his vehement dislike, even hatred for another monk. The speaker goes out of his way to detail numerous examples of how the other...

Latest answer posted February 21, 2021 6:54 am UTC

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Soliloquy of the Spanish Cloister

The first sound affect ("Gr-r-r-there go") serves to set the tone and intent of the dramatic monologue poem "Soliloquy of the Spanish Cloister" by Robert Browning. There is no mistaking the meaning...

Latest answer posted August 23, 2010 6:05 am UTC

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Soliloquy of the Spanish Cloister

Like many of Robert Browning's wonderful poems, "Soliloquy of the Spanish Cloister" is a dramatic monologue--a kind of little play in verse. Biographical criticism, which depends on an...

Latest answer posted August 8, 2010 2:14 pm UTC

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