The Soldier Questions and Answers

The Soldier

In “The Solider,” Rupert Brooke uses alliteration, the repetition of identical initial consonant sounds close together, to drive home the profound love he feels for his homeland. To see an...

Latest answer posted January 20, 2021, 12:09 pm (UTC)

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The Soldier

The speaker of Rupert Brooke's poem "The Soldier" presents dying for England during the First World War in bittersweet terms. The poem does not glorify death in patriotic terms but does lament that...

Latest answer posted July 15, 2019, 11:31 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

The Soldier

In his death on a foreign battlefield, the speaker believes that he will figuratively transform part of that field into England. The speaker asks readers to remember him fondly. If he should die on...

Latest answer posted August 1, 2019, 10:40 am (UTC)

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The Soldier

The "suns of home" can possibly be taken as a homophone for "sons." The soldier who is narrating is fighting in the war (1914-18) alongside other Englishmen, all sons of home, all radiating the...

Latest answer posted September 8, 2016, 6:42 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Soldier

A Man Cannot be Separated from His Country The speaker refers to his home country seven times throughout the poem. By the third line, readers know where his sense of patriotism lies: with England....

Latest answer posted August 1, 2019, 11:39 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Soldier

The speaker of this poem is the only character of the work. Very often in poetry the speaker is not actually the author, and the use of the first person pronoun "I" is not always indicative of the...

Latest answer posted August 1, 2019, 2:22 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Soldier

Parallelism is defined as using elements in sentences that are grammatically similar or identical in structure, sound, meaning, or meter. For example, referring to Brooke’s poem: “That there’s some...

Latest answer posted January 27, 2016, 11:00 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Soldier

In a sense, the dichotomy between individual and universal evil may be a false opposition, for the nameless soldier narrator of this poem is not really an individual, so much as a universal...

Latest answer posted April 3, 2012, 8:32 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Soldier

This poem has two titles, "The Soldier" and also "Nineteen-Fourteen: The Soldier." The second of these titles, especially, helps us to understand that the poem will, in some way, address the...

Latest answer posted August 1, 2019, 10:43 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Soldier

The poem is told from the first-person point of view of a patriotic English soldier on the battlefield who loves his country dearly. He is addressing a beloved person or people back home. In these...

Latest answer posted May 15, 2020, 4:05 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Soldier

Rupert Brooke's "The Soldier" is a patriotic, idealistic war poem written from the perspective of the eponymous soldier. In the poem, the soldier contemplates his own death and the value of a life...

Latest answer posted August 1, 2019, 11:26 am (UTC)

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The Soldier

In this poem, a soldier claims that if he dies in the war (presumably World War I), the little space of foreign soil in which he is buried will "for ever" become a piece of England. Beneath the...

Latest answer posted September 15, 2019, 9:46 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Soldier

When the poem begins, its speaker is fairly quickly revealed to be the soldier referenced by the title. The soldier begins, saying, If I should die, think only this of me:That there's some corner...

Latest answer posted August 1, 2019, 1:59 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer