Socialism, Bolshevism, and the Red Scare

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Socialism, Bolshevism, and the Red Scare Questions and Answers

Socialism, Bolshevism, and the Red Scare

Good question, but unfortunately it is also a great example of trying to explain the Russian Revolution with a bumper sticker answer. The standard answer will be that WWI created the conditions...

Latest answer posted January 4, 2015, 12:06 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

Socialism, Bolshevism, and the Red Scare

There were actually two eras that became known as the Red Scare in the United States. The first occurred following World War I, and the second took place after World War II. Both had to do with the...

Latest answer posted June 13, 2020, 1:25 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

Socialism, Bolshevism, and the Red Scare

The Industrial Revolution had many positive achievements, such as enlarging the consumer economy and making goods cheaper for all; however, one of the major downsides to the Industrial Revolution...

Latest answer posted December 29, 2019, 2:09 pm (UTC)

5 educator answers

Socialism, Bolshevism, and the Red Scare

The "Red Scare" following the First World War and the Bolshevik Revolution was used by elements in the Justice Department (in particular a young J. Edgar Hoover) to bolster their careers. The two...

Latest answer posted July 28, 2009, 5:12 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

Socialism, Bolshevism, and the Red Scare

The famed Italian anarchists who were electrocuted for murder in 1927, Ferdinando Nicolo Sacco (1891-1927) and Bartolomeo Vanzetti (1888-1927) both traveled to Mexico in 1917 in part to avoid being...

Latest answer posted January 13, 2012, 11:10 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Socialism, Bolshevism, and the Red Scare

The Communist Party in the United States never attracted anything like the levels of mass support of their European counterparts. To a large extent, this was because the New Deal under FDR...

Latest answer posted January 24, 2019, 11:11 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

Socialism, Bolshevism, and the Red Scare

The First Red Scare helped change the United States politically, economically, and socially. The Red Scare came after the Progressive Era and World War I. By 1920, Americans were looking for...

Latest answer posted October 2, 2015, 5:09 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Socialism, Bolshevism, and the Red Scare

The business community in the 1920s was able to use the Red Scare to help get the general public to side with it over the labor movement. It was able to do this by painting the labor movement as a...

Latest answer posted January 14, 2013, 10:12 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Socialism, Bolshevism, and the Red Scare

It should be noted when speaking about fears of radicalism that this was not entirely an invention. There were radicals within the United States and they did at times use violence. You can look...

Latest answer posted December 5, 2018, 5:53 am (UTC)

3 educator answers

Socialism, Bolshevism, and the Red Scare

The Red Scare was a period of anti-communist and anti-radical hysteria that gripped the United States after World War I and the Bolshevik Revolution. In some ways, it was an outgrowth of the...

Latest answer posted May 31, 2012, 5:59 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Socialism, Bolshevism, and the Red Scare

The federal government of the United States during the 1920s was notable for a conscious turn from the Progressive politics of the first part of the twentieth century. The presidents of the...

Latest answer posted November 4, 2012, 3:13 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

Socialism, Bolshevism, and the Red Scare

I think that the Red Scare really did much to bring out the "harmonious dissonance" of society in the time period. One of the reasons why the 1920s has monikers like "the Jazz Age" or "the Roaring...

Latest answer posted February 24, 2012, 9:11 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Socialism, Bolshevism, and the Red Scare

As fear of communism specifically, but radicals in general, grew after World War I, the potential for a Red Scare overreaction grew along with it. There had been many, many recent immigrants to...

Latest answer posted March 22, 2010, 8:50 am (UTC)

3 educator answers

Socialism, Bolshevism, and the Red Scare

Okay, sorry about that. So for the WWI one, here goes: The major thing that was going on in international politics was the Russian Revolution. In 1917, Russia had become communist, becoming the...

Latest answer posted October 26, 2009, 8:13 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

Socialism, Bolshevism, and the Red Scare

Starting in the late 1800s, disputes between the working class and upper/management class escalated, partly because of industrialization. Industry de-emphasized agricultural and rural life,...

Latest answer posted November 10, 2013, 7:53 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Socialism, Bolshevism, and the Red Scare

In answering this question, I will assume that you are asking about the Red Scare that occurred after World War I. There are at least three main reasons for this scare. The first reason for the...

Latest answer posted July 18, 2013, 11:13 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Socialism, Bolshevism, and the Red Scare

Much of this is going to be dependent on how one defines "conservatism." If one is defining it as a demonstration of strength of central authority, then the Red Scare would have functioned as an...

Latest answer posted March 28, 2011, 2:12 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

Socialism, Bolshevism, and the Red Scare

I would have to go with a false vote on the question. I think the Red Scare was motivated by the fear of Communism and the changing principles in Europe. The period in which the first Red Scare...

Latest answer posted March 30, 2010, 11:52 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

Socialism, Bolshevism, and the Red Scare

I think that what made socialism more frightening to people after WWI was mainly the creation of the Soviet Union. I would point out, however, that I am not sure that it was the working class after...

Latest answer posted October 14, 2010, 5:47 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Socialism, Bolshevism, and the Red Scare

I'll address the Red Scare of the 1920s, since it was the one that involved the most change. After Russia fell to the Bolsheviks in 1917-1918, America was afraid that Russian agents would seek to...

Latest answer posted August 11, 2016, 7:15 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Socialism, Bolshevism, and the Red Scare

The mood of Americans after World War I can be seen in responses to the Red Scare, increasing immigration, and the activities of the Ku Klux Klan. Americans wanted to turn inward. We wanted to...

Latest answer posted November 2, 2015, 2:05 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Socialism, Bolshevism, and the Red Scare

Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti were two Italian American anarchists convicted of murder and armed robbery in 1920, crimes for which they were executed seven years later. Their executions came...

Latest answer posted March 10, 2018, 1:13 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Socialism, Bolshevism, and the Red Scare

Although the Red Scare is an American phenomenon, it is rooted in the First World War and the 1917 Russian Revolution. While the U.S. was still at war with Germany, the new Bolshevik government...

Latest answer posted August 31, 2010, 9:07 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Socialism, Bolshevism, and the Red Scare

The Palmer Raids were caused by two main factors. One of these was domestic while the other was international. On the international scene, there was the Russian Revolution and the general rise of...

Latest answer posted March 24, 2013, 5:10 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Socialism, Bolshevism, and the Red Scare

Even today, this question is one on which historians differ based on their political beliefs. For liberals, there is a strong feeling that Sacco and Vanzetti were convicted and executed because of...

Latest answer posted March 14, 2012, 2:24 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

Socialism, Bolshevism, and the Red Scare

In answering this question, it is important that we realize that there is no way to objectively know what causes human beings to have certain attitudes. We can speculate about what things would...

Latest answer posted January 16, 2013, 7:25 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Socialism, Bolshevism, and the Red Scare

There are at least two possible ways to answer this question. First, the jury might have found Sacco and Vanzetti guilty because the two men were actually guilty. Second, the jury might have...

Latest answer posted March 12, 2016, 10:05 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer