Sir Philip Sidney Questions and Answers

Sir Philip Sidney

In Sir Philip Sidney's "Apology for Poetry," he addresses the conflict between the moral philosopher, the historian, and the poet. He subscribes to the Aristotelian view that poetry highlights...

Latest answer posted November 3, 2016, 6:24 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

Sir Philip Sidney

Sir Philip Sidney was an advocate of learning and wanted people to use every opportunity to better their understanding. In An Apology for Poetry also called Defence of Poesie, he defends the use of...

Latest answer posted October 8, 2013, 8:23 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Sir Philip Sidney

Meter is defined in scansion as the rhythm and the number of repeating patterns. A question about meter excludes structure and rhyme scheme. The meter of Sydney's "My True-Love Hath My Heart" is a...

Latest answer posted November 2, 2010, 12:50 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Sir Philip Sidney

You may notice that the poem's title is preceded by the phrase "Song from Arcadia." Arcadia refers to a mythological pastoral paradise or utopia in which people live in harmony with nature. The...

Latest answer posted February 7, 2019, 12:29 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

Sir Philip Sidney

Sidney's long essay Defence of Poesie encapsulates several ideas that are typical of Renaissance thinking. His primary intention seems to be of showing that the writing of poetry has some special...

Latest answer posted February 27, 2020, 7:00 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Sir Philip Sidney

In the vast majority of his sonnets, Sir Philip Sidney adheres to the so-called "Petrarchan" sonnet form, named after its Italian originator Petrarch. This type of sonnet originated the...

Latest answer posted January 16, 2018, 7:38 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Sir Philip Sidney

Sir Philip Sidney’s “Sonnet 31,” as a perfect example of apostrophe (the figure of speech in which the speaker talks to an absent person or an inanimate object), is a direct address to the moon....

Latest answer posted February 5, 2009, 9:52 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Sir Philip Sidney

Sonnet 31 addresses the moon in a type of personification called pathetic fallacy. Personification through pathetic fallacy is used only for nature (strict personification is used for nature,...

Latest answer posted December 29, 2014, 11:52 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

Sir Philip Sidney

It is from Astrophel and Stella, a fictional account of a love story - which might have some relevance to Sidney himself, but that is debate-able. "Astrophel" means star (astro) and lover (phil)...

Latest answer posted March 11, 2010, 8:47 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Sir Philip Sidney

I think I'll have a go at it...it looks like an interesting poem. You're right, though, it isn't an easy one to find analysis of: stanza 1 My mouth doth water, and my breast doth swell, My tongue...

Latest answer posted October 18, 2009, 6:39 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Sir Philip Sidney

Sir Philip Sidney's sonnets are collected in his sonnet cycle Astrophil and Stella, names meaning Star-Lover and Star, respectively. Sonneteers wrote a lifetime of sonnets that were unified in...

Latest answer posted June 28, 2011, 8:07 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

Sir Philip Sidney

In Sir Philip Sidney's "Sonnet XXXI", the writer is addressing the moon. In the first two lines, he is commenting on the pale, sad appearance of the moon, and then, in the remainder of...

Latest answer posted November 3, 2008, 12:12 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Sir Philip Sidney

In the following lines taken from Sir Philip Sidney's "Defense of Poesy" (1595), he is discussing the current state of affairs in poetry and the writing of poetry. In (a), "our tragedies and...

Latest answer posted June 29, 2010, 8:55 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Sir Philip Sidney

An apology in this context means a defense. And what Sir Philip's defending here is poetry. To be more specific he's defending it against those such as the Ancient Greek philosopher Plato who...

Latest answer posted February 11, 2019, 6:38 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

Sir Philip Sidney

Sidney included this poem in his incredibly popular proto-novel, Arcadia. A shepherdess sings this to a beloved shepherd, and it is thus a beautiful pastoral interlude. The pastoral became a...

Latest answer posted December 28, 2018, 3:36 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

Sir Philip Sidney

The rhythm, or meter, of this poem is iambic pentameter. Iambic pentameter is the most common meter in British poetry (especially pre-twentieth century), and it also the meter that most resembles...

Latest answer posted November 2, 2010, 11:30 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Sir Philip Sidney

Given the fact that in the sixteenth century, when Sidney lived and composed his poetry, it was only really the upper classes, some of the aspiring middle classes, and a select few other...

Latest answer posted October 20, 2013, 7:57 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Sir Philip Sidney

Sonnet 21 from Sir Philip Sidney’s Astrophil and Stella sonnet sequence is a highly typical poem that exemplifies many of the standard themes and techniques of the sequence as a whole. In this...

Latest answer posted July 4, 2011, 8:02 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Sir Philip Sidney

The sonnet begins with an invocation to sleep, which is personified and given an extravagant set of titles, beginning with those that emphasize the restorative qualities of sleep and continuing to...

Latest answer posted October 19, 2019, 3:43 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

Sir Philip Sidney

“The Bargain” is part of Sir Philip Sidney's pastoral romance Arcadia, and it presents a love relationship through the imagery of an exchange of hearts. Let's look at this more closely. The speaker...

Latest answer posted September 17, 2021, 12:30 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Sir Philip Sidney

In this poem, a female speaker describes the intense bond she feels with and for a beloved male. The poem reiterates the basic idea that the lovers have exchanged hearts: she possesses his heart...

Latest answer posted June 28, 2011, 2:45 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Sir Philip Sidney

In general, Sidney's defense of poetry (or poesie) was in response to attacks on poetry (namely from Stephen Gosson at the time) who claimed that "fiction-making" was morally questionable. Sidney...

Latest answer posted May 15, 2015, 9:39 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Sir Philip Sidney

In a particularly important passage of his Apology for Poetry, Sir Philip Sidney sums up a number of his most significant assumptions about poetry as an art. He speaks of poets as writers who...

Latest answer posted March 15, 2012, 8:03 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Sir Philip Sidney

Sir Philip Sidney's poem "My True Love Hath My Heart" is written in iambic pentameter. (This is the rhythm.) This means that there are ten syllables per line, and that the stress rests on every...

Latest answer posted November 15, 2010, 9:33 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Sir Philip Sidney

Sidney's Sonnet 31 is replete with clever and often humorous plays on words as wordplay is an important quality in a Renaissance courtier and writer. J.C.A. Rathmell contends that Sidney's poetry...

Latest answer posted November 7, 2014, 7:08 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Sir Philip Sidney

This poem by Philip Sidney is a sonnet, so the structure of the poem is 14 lines, and in this case, it has an Italian Sonnet structure. You can see that the first 8 lines (the octet) are broken...

Latest answer posted November 4, 2010, 10:18 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Sir Philip Sidney

This is the internal conflict the speaker is experiencing. He believes he can connect with Stella if he can get her to read his writing, even if it means she does so out of pity for him. As the...

Latest answer posted October 18, 2011, 11:44 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Sir Philip Sidney

The desire for Truth in the 16th century (1500s) was expressed in Sir Philip Sidney's poetic treatise The Defence of Poetry. In it he explains the poetical concept of mimesis, or mimetics: the art...

Latest answer posted January 29, 2013, 2:03 am (UTC)

1 educator answer