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  • Shakespeare's Sonnets
    "Sonnet 129" takes a rather pessimistic approach to sex and lust. In the poem, the "spirit" which drives man's "lust" is described vividly as "perjured, murderous, bloody," like a criminal whose...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Shakespeare's Sonnets
    I assume you are referring to Shakespeare's "Fair Youth" sonnets (1–126) with this question. These sonnets were written to an unidentified young man beloved of the poet, and many of them focus...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    2 educator answers

  • Shakespeare's Sonnets
    The love described in "Sonnet 75" is undoubtedly extant; while it may not be that love of a poet for his patron as is conveyed in this particular sonnet, the expression of love that is written can...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Shakespeare's Sonnets
    (All line citations are taken from the text available at the Shakespeare Online reference provided.) Question 1: Which of the following best describes the whole structure of the poem as a whole? A)...

    Asked by user7443931 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Shakespeare's Sonnets
    The poem is a lament by the speaker about fickleness. The speaker, upon an occasion, hears a nightingale sing and takes pity on the poor bird for its beautiful song sounds like a wail. He then...

    Asked by revathi5153 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Shakespeare's Sonnets
    Although many of the lines from Sonnet 116 are simply abstract statements about love, we do find several examples of imagery: 1. "That looks on tempests, and is never shaken;" Here, the speaker is...

    Asked by nssackaria on via web

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  • Shakespeare's Sonnets
    There is more than one form of the sonnet. Shakespeare popularized the English sonnet. It has three quatrains (four-line stanzas) and a rhymed couplet (two-line stanza) at the end. The rhyme scheme...

    Asked by user6236265 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Shakespeare's Sonnets
    Shakespeare's "Sonnet 112" opens with a metaphor in the first two lines: Your love and pity doth the impression fillWhich vulgar scandal stamp'd upon my brow; (1-2) In these lines, the speaker...

    Asked by kelvesiahogan0000 on via web

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  • Shakespeare's Sonnets
    These lines are from the couplet of Shakespeare's sonnet 116, Let me not to the marriage of true minds ... Let me not to the marriage of true mindsAdmit impediments. Love is not loveWhich alters...

    Asked by annietink1972 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Shakespeare's Sonnets
    In this angry sonnet, the narrator curses the Dark Lady he is in love with because she has also trapped the heart of the young man the narrator is also in love with. The narrator feels enslaved and...

    Asked by angela1valentino on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Shakespeare's Sonnets
    Shakespeare used the English sonnet form to develop a metaphor in three quatrains (groupings of four lines) and then an outcome in the final couplet (two lines). The speaker in sonnet 1 addresses...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Shakespeare's Sonnets
    I'll address each portion of your question individually: A Shakespearean sonnet is written in iambic pentameter, a type of meter. "Iambe" is a foot, or a unit of measurement in language, that...

    Asked by user9780214 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Shakespeare's Sonnets
    The speaker in sonnet 73 compares himself to yellowed leaves, ruined church buildings, twilight, sunset and a last glowing ember lying in the ashes of a fire that is almost burned out. All of these...

    Asked by user5935460 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Shakespeare's Sonnets
    You can analyze a poem in a variety of ways by taking into account rhyme, meter, theme, subject, structure, etc. I always like to start with rhyme. "Sonnet 84" is a standard Shakespearean sonnet...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Shakespeare's Sonnets
    Shakespeare had a deservedly high opinion of his poetic genius. It is a bit uncanny that he seems to be knowing that we will be reading his lines so many years after his death. In quite a few...

    Asked by helpdesk on via web

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  • Shakespeare's Sonnets
    The "problem" in Sonnet 130 is that Shakespeare is attempting to write an over-the-top sonnet full of elevated language about a woman who is clearly only ordinary looking -- or perhaps even ugly....

    Asked by britt997xo on via web

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  • Shakespeare's Sonnets
    Sonnet 29 is one of Shakespeare's most famous sonnets. It is a characteristic to be found in many of his sonnets that he deviates from the iambic pentameter lines at one turning point. In Sonnet...

    Asked by user5703694 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Shakespeare's Sonnets
    Scholars believe that Shakespeare's sonnets were based on his personal relationships, namely with the Fair Youth (Sonnets 1-126), and, therefore, deal the subjects of love, friendship, and...

    Asked by user6911167 on via web

    3 educator answers

  • Shakespeare's Sonnets
    While both Shakespeare's Sonnet 80 and Sonnet 130 incorporate contrasts, the poems are fundamentally different in a couple of key ways. First, in Sonnet 80, Shakespeare is addressing a young man,...

    Asked by pkhosla39 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Shakespeare's Sonnets
    Sonnet 22 is written to a beautiful young man whom Shakespeare loves and mentors (this is not a homosexual poem, in case you're wondering). It essentially says the following: My mirror won't...

    Asked by rockyrules1000 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Shakespeare's Sonnets
    The speaker in both sonnets is a man (presumably) who does not care about what a woman looks like, only how beautiful she is inside. He is mature enough to overlook physicality and focus on the...

    Asked by user6847282 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Shakespeare's Sonnets
    We have no evidence of why William Shakespeare wrote his sonnets. He did not leave behind any account of his reasons for writing them. Because he wrote before the advent of copyright, he would not...

    Asked by savannahlacoss16 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Shakespeare's Sonnets
    First, I'd like to say that you are absolutely on the right track in your writing process here. First, you have chosen your authors. Next you have chosen your theme, and now you are working on...

    Asked by elmabalic on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Shakespeare's Sonnets
    The Italian term sonetto simply means a short or little song. The fourteen-line sonnet form with which later became known as the "Italian" or "Petrarchan" sonnet appears to have first been...

    Asked by user618686 on via web

    2 educator answers

  • Shakespeare's Sonnets
    In addition to his formidable output as a playwright, William Shakespeare wrote a particular form of poem called a sonnet. He is credited with 154 sonnets, almost all of which follow the same...

    Asked by enotes on via web

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  • Literature
    By far the most common literary devices used in Shakespeare's sonnets are metaphors and similes. Another common literary device is poetic conceits, but it is Shakespeare's metaphors and similes...

    Asked by saphira90 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Sonnet XVI
    Your question indicates that you are comparing Shakespeare's Sonnet XXVII to John Milton's Sonnet VXI and you link to John Milton's Sonnet XVI, which starts, "Cromwell, our chief of men..." But,...

    Asked by sakerbubbles on via web

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  • Shakespeare's Sonnets
    This is a good question. From a broad perspective, the whole sonnet is figurative. From the surface it is hard to understand what is happening, but under closer examination, there are three main...

    Asked by bgehrig4400 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • William Shakespeare
    The structure of William Shakespeare's Sonnet 11, "As fast as thou shalt wane, so fast thou grow'st" is comprised both of repeated patterns of sound and of rhetorical patterns giving shape to the...

    Asked by samantha-burton on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Shakespeare's Sonnets
    Your question really made me think! I am very proud of you for attempting this particular thesis and, yes, there are things "that come to my mind from the sonnets that might be linked to plays."...

    Asked by angelusblanc on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Reference
    Even in his first sonnet, Shakespeare alludes to the never-ending quest for permanence as he wishes that, "Beauty's rose might never die."(1 line 2) By preserving, in this case, beauty, Shakespeare...

    Asked by uglylion on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Shakespeare's Sonnets
    In specific Shakespearean sonnets, the theme of unfaithfulness is explored as a part of human identity. It reflects a complex nature of being. This intricate development of identity as a result of...

    Asked by parkerj on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Shakespeare's Sonnets
    Within Shakespeare's sonnets, there are contradictions and complexities that certainly resist generalization on any topic or theme. Still, the portrayal of beauty and love prevail through most of...

    Asked by parottukonam on via web

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  • Shakespeare's Sonnets
    Shakespeare's first division of Sonnets, I-CXXIX, subvert courtly love since the one addressed is a man, rather than a woman. So, while the poet addresses the man in language appropriate to a...

    Asked by ninniclements on via web

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  • Shakespeare's Sonnets
    This sonnet explores the tremendous beauty of the object of Shakespeare's affection. The speaker chooses to emphasise his beloved's beauty through personifying nature as a woman in her own right...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Shakespeare's Sonnets
    Shakespeare certainly does have several sonnets that concern the theme of friendship. One of the best examples can be seen in Sonnet 29. This sonnet opens with the speaker feeling in a state of...

    Asked by porthimi on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Shakespeare's Sonnets
    If someone wrote Sonnet 30 to me, I would feel very good indeed. Most of the poem is about the speaker’s regrets. The language is old fashioned, but if you look at phrases like “I sigh with...

    Asked by Jasonprince on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Shakespeare's Sonnets
    Shakespeare definitely was a poet who, at times, deliberately subverted and challenged the norms of his day and age in his literature to expound his message. This is certainly true of his treatment...

    Asked by user6063512 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Shakespeare's Sonnets
    One of Shakespeare's most famous sonnets, Sonnet XVIII extoles the quality of love that can transcend the mortality of Nature, while at the same time it recognizes the qualities in nature that...

    Asked by abdulghani on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Hamlet
    In Sonnet 3 death is viewed in a way that is very similar to how it is presented in Hamlet. In Act III scene 1, for example, Hamlet in his soliloquy describes death as: The undiscovered country...

    Asked by leoys on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Shakespeare's Sonnets
    Shakespeare's sonnets are concerned with love, beauty, poetry, and, perhaps most pervasively, the force that the passage of time exerts upon all three. In Sonnet 116, the narrator tells the "young...

    Asked by enotes on via web

  • Shakespeare's Sonnets
    Of the 154 sonnets in the now standard edition, 29 feature the unusual device of a question within the first quatrain. The initiation of the sonnet with a question accords with a logical pattern...

    Asked by enotes on via web

  • Shakespeare's Sonnets
    Shakespeare loves great work and full length play,that's why he liked collection form of the sonnets. Through this work,he got a great applause.

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  • Shakespeare's Sonnets
    The first 126 of Shakespeare's collected 154 sonnets are addressed to a young man; and based on the premise that the poet had an actual individual in mind when he wrote them, several efforts have...

    Asked by enotes on via web

  • Shakespeare's Sonnets
    The second (and last) set of poems (127 through 154) in Shakespeare's sonnets is addressed to a "Dark Lady." Akin to the search for the identity of the "young man," some of Shakespeare's...

    Asked by enotes on via web

  • Shakespeare's Sonnets
    There are at least two major deviations from standard Shakespearean sonnet form among the 154 pieces now grouped under the heading of Shakespeare's Sonnets. Sonnet 126, the last in the "young man"...

    Asked by enotes on via web

  • Shakespeare's Sonnets
    William Shakepseare's "Sonnet 104" speaks to his view on friendship (or at least his narrator's view on friendship). This sonnet illustrates the timeless nature of friendship for Shakespeare....

    Asked by sohel on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Shakespeare's Sonnets
    The Elizabethan sonnet is also called the English or Shakespearean sonnet. The Elizabethan sonnet tends to contain messages of love (similar to the Petrarchan sonnet). The Elizabethan sonnet...

    Asked by shewa55 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Shakespeare's Sonnets
    These sonnets by Shakespeare relate to the theme of love but Shakespeare, tired of the overly romantic view which people purport to support and which only complicates love, gives a down-to-earth...

    Asked by user7652626 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Shakespeare's Sonnets
    William Shakespeare's "Sonnet 2" is written using iambic pentameter (five pairs of iambs, equally ten syllables). It contains fourteen lines (three quatrains and a couplet). The first twelve lines...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

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