School for Scandal Questions and Answers

School for Scandal

The style of Richard Sheridan’s play The School for Scandal relies heavily on juxtaposition and not-so-subtle mockery. The sneering style connects to the play’s genre, which, as the question notes,...

Latest answer posted January 8, 2021 3:11 pm UTC

4 educator answers

School for Scandal

Gossip drives School for Scandal, a play in which far too often characters mistake appearance for reality and falsehood for truth. The play is a study of how gossip—which could be defined as words...

Latest answer posted June 3, 2020 1:43 pm UTC

5 educator answers

School for Scandal

In Richard Brinsley Sheridan's play School for Scandal, female characters both generate false stories and rumors about others and play an active role in circulating those stories. This leads to the...

Latest answer posted July 2, 2019 10:22 pm UTC

1 educator answer

School for Scandal

I would say that the main theme centers around morality. There are distinct groups of characters - those who are members of the "school for scandal" and those who are not. In the first...

Latest answer posted November 15, 2008 5:16 am UTC

1 educator answer

School for Scandal

Sheridan uses his characters’ names in School for Scandal to generate humor. Names like Snake and Sneerwell cannot but be amusing. But they have an additional purpose in that they tell us straight...

Latest answer posted June 21, 2020 6:54 am UTC

4 educator answers

School for Scandal

In act 4, scene 3, Joseph is expecting a visit from Lady Teazle. Before she arrives, Joseph asks his servant to place a screen before the window to prevent an inquisitive maiden lady living...

Latest answer posted February 22, 2019 9:14 am UTC

2 educator answers

School for Scandal

Richard Brinsley Sheridan's School for Scandal is a play that results entirely from, well, scandal. For a period of time in the eighteenth century, rumor became a huge part of high society....

Latest answer posted June 24, 2019 1:23 am UTC

2 educator answers

School for Scandal

Sir Oliver has been away sixteen years and amassed a fortune in India that he wants to give to the more worthy of his two nephews, his brother's sons. He has heard reports that Charles is a gambler...

Latest answer posted March 31, 2012 1:40 am UTC

1 educator answer

School for Scandal

School for Scandal, a comedy of manners, is a play about the dangers of gossiping. In the course of the play, Sir Oliver, disguised as a moneylender, spies on his nephews, Charles and Joseph, to...

Latest answer posted July 21, 2017 1:51 am UTC

2 educator answers

School for Scandal

The auction scene is significant because through it Sir Oliver comes to a better understanding of his nephew Charles' true character. All along the good-natured Charles has been in severe financial...

Latest answer posted July 10, 2017 12:17 pm UTC

1 educator answer

School for Scandal

The gossips in the play symbolize the lack of honor and morality that exists in their society. None of the gossips considers what effect their spreading of rumors will have, and it doesn't take...

Latest answer posted April 2, 2010 4:59 am UTC

1 educator answer

School for Scandal

The difference in one succinct statement is that 17th century Restoration comedies of manners were morally objectionable--and replaced by moral though unrealistic sentimental comedies--while the...

Latest answer posted September 1, 2013 3:02 pm UTC

1 educator answer

School for Scandal

Richard Sheridan's play, School for Scandal, was one of the most popular comedy of manners during the latter half of the 18th century. Major characters include: Sir Benjamin Backbite. Rude suitor...

Latest answer posted December 29, 2009 10:43 am UTC

1 educator answer

School for Scandal

"School for Scandal" by Richard Brinsley Sheridan, although written later than the classic "Restoration" comedies, is still quite similar in that it is a comedy of manners. Its main characters are...

Latest answer posted October 19, 2015 3:24 pm UTC

1 educator answer

School for Scandal

Culture is defined as the behavior patterns shared by a group of people. Anthropologist Edward B. Tylor defined such behavior as the "knowledge, belief, art, law, morals, custom and any other...

Latest answer posted June 20, 2016 9:17 am UTC

2 educator answers

School for Scandal

As with all of Sheridan's dramatic works, this excellent play acts as the metaphorical equivalent of Sheridan holding up a mirror to his contemporary audience and asking them to take a long hard...

Latest answer posted December 27, 2011 12:43 am UTC

1 educator answer

School for Scandal

Sheridan's School for Scandal is the epitome of Restoration comedy, a genre of drama that dominated the English stage from the late-seventeenth to the early eighteenth centuries. It is widely...

Latest answer posted June 14, 2021 12:57 pm UTC

1 educator answer

School for Scandal

School for Scandal was written by Richard Brinsley Sheridan and first performed in London at Drury Lane Theatre in 1777. It is a comedy of manners, also known as a "comedy of intrigue," and the...

Latest answer posted October 27, 2019 5:29 pm UTC

1 educator answer

School for Scandal

While I have not read School for Scandal by Richard Brinsley Sheridan, I do know that e-notes has some resources that would probably be quite helpful to you. Try checking out the following e-note...

Latest answer posted April 9, 2010 11:49 am UTC

1 educator answer

School for Scandal

Take your pick! The play is full of liars, hypocrites, and backbiters. If one had to narrow it down, however, you'd probably have to give the dishonesty prize to the revolting Joseph, the older...

Latest answer posted June 24, 2019 9:29 am UTC

1 educator answer

School for Scandal

The School for Scandal has been hugely popular ever since it was first performed on the London stage in 1777. Ever since then, audiences the world over have been delighted by the remarkable wit,...

Latest answer posted November 15, 2018 7:34 am UTC

2 educator answers

School for Scandal

This short passage does much to differentiate Sheridan's School for Scandal from the style of early-eighteenth-century Restoration drama to which it owes so much. The dialogue, plot, and...

Latest answer posted February 23, 2020 9:24 am UTC

2 educator answers

School for Scandal

Summarizing Act II, scene ii would be a tedious and dull business if it weren't for the relief given by Sir Peter and Maria. This scene is staged at Lady Sneerwell's. The symbolism of the names...

Latest answer posted March 31, 2012 2:30 am UTC

1 educator answer

School for Scandal

The School for Scandal (1751-1816) by Richard Brinsley Sheridan is classified as a "comedy of manners", a genre typically set in the drawing rooms of the idle rich, using intricate plot twists and...

Latest answer posted September 25, 2018 6:22 pm UTC

1 educator answer

School for Scandal

How about The Children's Hour by Lillian Hellman? It is later than the time fram you want, as it is from 1934. But the theme is one of gossip, and how it destroys the lives of the people concerned....

Latest answer posted November 29, 2009 5:06 am UTC

1 educator answer