Questions and Answers for Saki

Saki

In Saki's short story "Fur," two friends find out who is true and who is not. Suzanne and Eleanor are friends. Eleanor seems to be the true friend. She agrees to meet with Suzanne's cousin Bertram...

Latest answer posted December 18, 2011 2:08 am UTC

1 educator answer

Saki

The theme of this story is betrayal and deception: Eleanor is a false friend who uses her friend Suzanne's confidences to stab her in the back. Eleanor pretends to be Suzanne's friend but treats...

Latest answer posted December 14, 2017 1:46 am UTC

2 educator answers

Saki

Saki (H. H. Munro) succeeds in his fiction because of his inimitable blend of satire, irony, startling endings, clever dialogue, sparkling wit, psychological insight, unconventional settings,...

Latest answer posted June 10, 2011 7:45 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Saki

The moral of "The Seven Cream Jugs" can be summarized with the statement “Do not judge others if you cannot stand others judging you.” In this story, the Pigeoncotes, a wealthy couple, have just...

Latest answer posted August 18, 2016 9:10 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Saki

Wilfrid has a reputation of being a kleptomaniac. This is someone who has a compulsion to steal, and even though he's just inherited the title of baron and all the phenomenal wealth that goes with...

Latest answer posted August 6, 2018 5:01 am UTC

2 educator answers

Saki

The irony of Saki's "The Lumber Room" is in the twists of events. Instead of the self-appointed aunt being successful in punishing Nicholas and rewarding the other children by sending them to the...

Latest answer posted March 9, 2016 2:35 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Saki

For Saki, satire is the tool with which he is most proficient; in addition satire serves Saki's purposes as an author. For satire, while providing humor in its ridiculing of human foolishness or...

Latest answer posted July 25, 2011 4:39 am UTC

2 educator answers

Saki

This line that you are citing comes from "The Open Window," by Saki. The narrator says this with reference to Framton Nuttel. The narrator uses these lines to describe Nuttel when Nuttel starts...

Latest answer posted July 14, 2010 10:18 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Saki

Mr. and Mrs. Pigeoncote have always been reluctant to invite cousin Wilfrid to stay with them, as he's an incorrigible kleptomaniac. This means that he has an uncontrollable impulse to steal...

Latest answer posted July 21, 2019 9:42 am UTC

1 educator answer

Saki

Following Saki's signature style, even the singularly ridiculous name of the Pigeoncotes hints at their similarly peculiar personalities. A parody of the shallow English upper classes, the...

Latest answer posted August 20, 2016 4:32 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Saki

There are two main images found in Saki's "The Image of the Lost Soul": the little bird and the Lost Soul. Both images represent the idea of the solitary, exiled, and embraced. The little bird is...

Latest answer posted September 9, 2013 11:47 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Saki

Saki's written style is perfectly matched to his choice of settings. He often sets his stories in the kind of respectable social environments with which he was all-too familiar. One thinks of the...

Latest answer posted April 26, 2019 6:20 am UTC

1 educator answer

Saki

"The Lumber Room," like Saki's "Open Window" is a little more lighthearted than his darker tales such as "The Interlopers." At first glance, "The Lumber Room" seems to be about a clever boy who...

Latest answer posted December 14, 2009 8:19 am UTC

1 educator answer

Saki

One clue that this story is set in the past and was written in the past is that Bertie is fishing for money and only comes up with a sixpence, which the author refers to earlier as a sixpenny. The...

Latest answer posted August 6, 2018 1:01 am UTC

2 educator answers

Saki

"Tobermory" is a half-comical, half-sinister story published in 1911 in the Chronicles of Clovis. It is, primarily, the story of an incident concerning a cat named Tobermory, who has the curious...

Latest answer posted August 18, 2016 5:43 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Saki

In "The Blind Spot," by Saki, Egbert has just come from his Aunt Adelaide's funeral. He has been named executor and principal heir of her belongings. Egbert is having lunch with his Uncle Lulworth....

Latest answer posted July 25, 2011 1:19 am UTC

1 educator answer

Saki

It is ironic that Mr. Appin is killed by one of the animals he is working with, since working with the elephant was suggested as safer for people than having house cats and other household pets....

Latest answer posted August 29, 2015 9:35 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Saki

In "A Shot in the Dark," as is often the case in his short stories, Saki is satirizing the upper echelons of the British class system. The hapless Philip Sletherby is off to Brill Hall, hoping to...

Latest answer posted April 4, 2019 5:48 am UTC

2 educator answers

Saki

Only two characters appear in the story: Egbert and his Uncle Lulworth. They discuss three other characters: the married couple Peter and Alexandra, who were Egbert's aunt and uncle, now both...

Latest answer posted November 8, 2018 6:36 am UTC

1 educator answer

Saki

"The Music on the Hill" is very ambiguous, with a lot of room for interpretation. Was Sylvia's death all a terrible accident of a hunt gone wrong? Was it the work of the nature god Pan? Might Pan...

Latest answer posted November 23, 2020 10:38 am UTC

1 educator answer

Saki

Cornelius Appin has done the impossible: he has trained a regular cat to talk and make full use of human speech. While his deed is, in fact, quite amazing, it is very hard for those who surround...

Latest answer posted September 12, 2016 3:16 am UTC

1 educator answer

Saki

Hello! In Mrs. Packletide's Tiger, Loona Bimberton did not shoot a tiger; her chief accomplishment was being flown by an Algerian aviator eleven miles in an airplane. Mrs. Packletide and Loona...

Latest answer posted July 2, 2015 4:29 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Saki

To persuade a reader that satire is a valuable form of literature, first define what is “valuable” to a reader. It could be an enjoyable reading experience, a lesson from literature that can affect...

Latest answer posted November 27, 2018 4:47 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Saki

A blind spot is defined as "an area where a person's view is obstructed." This is the literal definition. In daily life, people often talk about having a figurative "blind spot" for someone; by...

Latest answer posted August 26, 2019 5:00 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Saki

In the enotes biography on Saki, this is written, Saki came to the short story as a satirist and never averted his eye from the darker side of human nature, a place where not only social...

Latest answer posted June 1, 2011 9:02 am UTC

1 educator answer

Saki

H. H. Munro (1870–1916), generally known by his pen name, Saki, originally wrote as a journalist, then turned to short fiction and novels—often satirical—as well as nonfiction. Born into an English...

Latest answer posted January 3, 2019 9:02 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Saki

As with most of Saki's short stories, the rationale behind the motivation and actions of many of his characters is often as shallow, empty, and senseless as the characters are themselves. Mrs....

Latest answer posted January 1, 2018 1:03 am UTC

1 educator answer

Saki

1909.

Latest answer posted April 14, 2012 5:24 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Saki

If you have used any of the study guide aids such as the essays and criticisms, character analysis, of summary, for instance, there is an icon on the page that you can click which will provide you...

Latest answer posted July 26, 2011 9:46 am UTC

1 educator answer

Saki

"A certain German art expert, who had obtained from the municipality of Bergamo permission to inspect the famous masterpiece, declared it to be a spurious Pincini, probably the work of some...

Latest answer posted October 18, 2008 2:23 pm UTC

1 educator answer