A Room of One's Own Questions and Answers

A Room of One's Own

In A Room of One's Own, Woolf is refuting the claim of a male writer that women's biological inferiority explains why they have not produced a body of great literature to rival men's. Woolf is in a...

Latest answer posted November 11, 2018, 9:36 pm (UTC)

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A Room of One's Own

In her essay “A Room of One’s Own,” Virginia Woolf imagines that William Shakespeare had a sister named Judith. Woolf argues, however, that Judith Shakespeare would have had far fewer opportunities...

Latest answer posted January 8, 2012, 3:31 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Room of One's Own

In chapter 3, Woolf recalls a bishop who "once declared that it was impossible for any woman, past, present, or to come, to have the genius of Shakespeare." The bishop was so adamant in this...

Latest answer posted May 23, 2019, 9:19 am (UTC)

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A Room of One's Own

In "A Room of One's Own," Virginia Woolf imagines that William Shakespeare had an equally gifted sister, Judith, who had none of the opportunities open to him. She did not go to the local grammar...

Latest answer posted November 14, 2019, 3:06 pm (UTC)

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A Room of One's Own

Clearly one of the central themes of this excellent essay is the way in which gender inequalities are presented as preventing equal opportunities. The Enlightenment, that argued that all men were...

Latest answer posted July 28, 2011, 10:43 pm (UTC)

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A Room of One's Own

When Woolf wrote A Room of One's Own in the 1920s, many people considered women less intelligent than men. Asserting that rights and resources would be wasted on women because they were inferior...

Latest answer posted June 26, 2016, 5:13 pm (UTC)

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A Room of One's Own

Woolf's purpose in writing A Room of One's Own is to push back against male writers who claimed that women were born intellectually inferior to men. When women would assert female equality with...

Latest answer posted March 24, 2019, 1:29 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

A Room of One's Own

Yes, Woolf uses a stream of consciousness technique to build her argument in "A Room of One's Own." In this essay, Woolf contrasts the wealth and privilege of men's colleges to the poverty of...

Latest answer posted April 26, 2018, 12:19 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

A Room of One's Own

In A Room of One's Own, Woolf pushes back against a commonly held idea in the 1920s that women were, with very rare exceptions, innately incapable of producing great literature. Woolf's feminist...

Latest answer posted July 22, 2020, 7:10 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Room of One's Own

Virginia Woolf convincingly demonstrates that it was impossible—not merely that it would have been impossible—for any woman to write plays like those that William Shakespeare wrote. As she...

Latest answer posted November 30, 2019, 10:40 pm (UTC)

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A Room of One's Own

In 'A Room of One's Own' by Virginia Woolf, the author predicts that until women have equal rights with men in terms of material wealth, career opportunities, support with issues impeding their...

Latest answer posted March 4, 2010, 9:46 pm (UTC)

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A Room of One's Own

In A Room of One's Own, Woolf argues that it was "the sense of chastity" which drove women, as late as the nineteenth century, to publish their works, not necessarily anonymously, but with the...

Latest answer posted May 30, 2018, 10:28 am (UTC)

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A Room of One's Own

According to Woolf's thesis, it's not so much that Elizabethan women didn't write poetry as it is that there were no outlets for their expression. Despite there being a queen on the throne, and a...

Latest answer posted January 19, 2021, 10:45 am (UTC)

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A Room of One's Own

In A Room of One's Own, Virginia Woolf uses the fictional character of Judith Shakespeare, the famous playwright's equally talented sister, to illustrate her point about the way in which the...

Latest answer posted September 6, 2020, 7:34 pm (UTC)

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A Room of One's Own

In this particular extract from A Room of One's Own, Woolf wonders what would've happened had Shakespeare had a sister, equal to him in genius and only different from him in terms of gender. The...

Latest answer posted January 30, 2020, 8:25 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Room of One's Own

When she first comes across Mary Carmichael’s novel Life’s Adventure,the narrator is initially unimpressed. The written style is not as smooth or as fluent as Jane Austen’s; the sentences don’t...

Latest answer posted July 10, 2020, 12:47 pm (UTC)

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A Room of One's Own

Early in the first section of A Room of One's Own, Woolf argues that "a woman must have money and a room of her own if she is to write." Here, Woolf puts forward a simple, clear line of argument....

Latest answer posted March 21, 2021, 9:08 am (UTC)

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A Room of One's Own

In this quote from chapter 3 of A Room of One's Own, Virginia Woolf is saying that socioeconomic class plays a direct role in one’s intellectual capability. She thinks that because working-class...

Latest answer posted October 26, 2020, 3:58 pm (UTC)

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A Room of One's Own

The essays in A Room of One's Own grew out of a request that Virginia Woolf received to lecture about "women and fiction." Throughout the book, she elaborates on different aspects of her...

Latest answer posted March 5, 2020, 5:03 pm (UTC)

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A Room of One's Own

Virginia Woolf wrote this book-length essay in response to claims still being made in the 1920s that women were intellectually inferior to men. Male essayists were arguing women did not create...

Latest answer posted February 27, 2020, 4:38 pm (UTC)

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A Room of One's Own

The central thesis of A Room of One's Own as it is generally understood is well captured in the title and is only slightly expanded by the often-quoted statement, "A woman must have money and a...

Latest answer posted September 21, 2019, 2:26 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

A Room of One's Own

In A Room of One’s Own, Virginia Woolf challenges the claim that women are intellectually inferior to men. Many male writers claimed this at the time, and Woolf aims to identify the flaws in this...

Latest answer posted June 24, 2021, 2:54 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Room of One's Own

In Chapter Three, Woolf talks about circumstances that prevent women from being able to access and express their artistic genius: distractions and indifference. A woman's role, by nature, is full...

Latest answer posted July 15, 2009, 3:16 am (UTC)

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A Room of One's Own

In A Room of One's Own, Woolf critiques both patriarchy and essentialism. Patriarchy is a system of organizing society that puts a preponderance of money and power in the hands of males. Women are...

Latest answer posted March 13, 2021, 4:44 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Room of One's Own

Woolf's speaker has a good deal to say about "truth" in this essay. There is a great deal of value in reading this work because it lays opens Woolf's thinking about truth. Woolf believes that no...

Latest answer posted April 28, 2020, 1:29 pm (UTC)

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A Room of One's Own

Virginia Woolf primarily uses logos to support her arguments, but she also makes effective use of irony in a humorous way. Some key devices include a rhetorical question and a thesis statement—that...

Latest answer posted April 21, 2019, 4:51 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

A Room of One's Own

Woolf says earlier that Englishwomen have had less intellectual freedom—in other words, freedom of thought—than the Athenian slaves. She goes on to say at the end that if we have the habit of...

Latest answer posted May 30, 2018, 12:11 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Room of One's Own

Whilst ruminating on the position of women in society, in Chapter Three Woolf begins to consider why, if Shakespeare had been born a woman, it would have been impossible for him (her) to write the...

Latest answer posted January 4, 2013, 7:49 am (UTC)

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A Room of One's Own

In A Room of One’s Own, Virginia Woolf uses the hypothetical case of Judith, the imaginary sister of William Shakespeare, to develop her portrayal of women’s situation in England’s Elizabethan age....

Latest answer posted July 22, 2020, 9:07 pm (UTC)

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A Room of One's Own

A woman at strife for herself is a woman at war with herself. What Woolf means by this is that a creative woman gets mixed signals. Her society, especially in the sixteenth century, taught her that...

Latest answer posted March 22, 2020, 8:02 pm (UTC)

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A Room of One's Own

In A Room of One's Own, Virgina Woolf agrees with a bishop who says that no woman could ever have written Shakespeare's plays but disagrees on the reason why. The bishop thinks no women could have...

Latest answer posted December 4, 2019, 10:59 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Room of One's Own

Woolf's line of argument begins with her question about "what state of mind is most propitious for creative work." It involves the hypothetical (made up) sister of Shakespeare, called "Judith" by...

Latest answer posted July 9, 2012, 5:55 pm (UTC)

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A Room of One's Own

In A Room of One's Own, Woolf mounts a powerful argument that it is not women's innate inferiority that has caused them to achieve less than men as writers. Instead, she contends, it is the social...

Latest answer posted October 19, 2019, 6:50 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Room of One's Own

In A Room of One's Own, Virginia Woolf imagines a scenario in which Shakespeare had a sister named Judith who was just as gifted as Shakespeare himself. Yet poor Judith had no chance to attend...

Latest answer posted August 13, 2021, 4:33 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Room of One's Own

World War I changed the way we looked at the world. Our endless faith in technology and naive lust for more of it dampened. We became a cloistered world, and people withdrew into themselves. We...

Latest answer posted July 29, 2011, 1:37 am (UTC)

3 educator answers

A Room of One's Own

In A Room of One's Own, Virginia Woolf speculates what it might have been like if Shakespeare had an “extraordinarily gifted sister” named Judith. She sets up the scenario by explaining that Judith...

Latest answer posted October 10, 2021, 7:11 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Room of One's Own

Let's examine what Virginia Woolf has to say about anger in "A Room of One's Own." Woolf describes a time when she is sitting in a class of some sort, sketching a picture of a professor who has...

Latest answer posted August 8, 2021, 7:11 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Room of One's Own

I think that some of the most basic of gender issues has to do with the notion of equal opportunities afforded to both genders. Woolf's premise is to challenge the idea that women "cannot" do what...

Latest answer posted October 15, 2011, 10:03 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Room of One's Own

In this powerful feminist treatise, Woolf argues that patriarchal society deliberately subordinates the position of women and makes it impossible, or at best extremely difficult, for them to...

Latest answer posted February 22, 2013, 7:24 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Room of One's Own

Two related points that Virginia Woolf raises in A Room of One’s Own are that countless women could have been writers if they had had more resources, and that many women did write but their...

Latest answer posted November 15, 2019, 2:09 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Room of One's Own

Woolf discusses the role of and the constraints on female authors in these lectures, later turned into a published book. In her discussion of Austen here, Woolf discusses the way fiction has...

Latest answer posted April 13, 2019, 4:45 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

A Room of One's Own

Woolf writes about a theoretical woman named Judith who was the talented sister of Shakespeare. She writes that "it would have been impossible, completely and entirely, for any woman to have...

Latest answer posted April 29, 2018, 12:33 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Room of One's Own

The entire piece of writing is a symbolic allegory, where each thing that Woolf focuses on is symbolic of a real thing in actual society. Take the two fictional universities that she writes about:...

Latest answer posted April 27, 2015, 3:58 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Room of One's Own

The concepts of conflict, complications, climax and turning point apply to fiction (and turning point especially to drama) but A Room of One's Own is a collection of speeches or lectures given at...

Latest answer posted August 12, 2013, 10:09 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Room of One's Own

The drive for equality of opportunity and representation in voice is present in Chapter 4 of Woolf's work. Woolf argues that the social discrimination of women's voices presents itself in artistic...

Latest answer posted January 16, 2011, 9:50 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Room of One's Own

As Woolf points out, a pen name was meant to protect a woman's reputation. A woman writing for money was working, and therefore might be considered outside of the control of her family, living a...

Latest answer posted February 24, 2019, 7:40 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

A Room of One's Own

Virginia Woolf begins "A Room of One's Own" with a rumination on what it means to give a talk about women and fiction, outlining what she thinks the people who invited her to speak might have been...

Latest answer posted December 27, 2019, 12:43 am (UTC)

4 educator answers

A Room of One's Own

Part of what makes Woolf's work so fascinatingly powerful is the openness of her demands and clarity of her conviction. This could be no more evident in her assertions behind why she claims women...

Latest answer posted August 25, 2009, 7:34 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Room of One's Own

I certainly cannot make a case that the entire Bible was written out of anger, as that is not the case, but I thought it would be interesting to present one particular story that focuses on Jesus'...

Latest answer posted August 13, 2011, 1:00 pm (UTC)

6 educator answers

A Room of One's Own

Woolf's long essay opens as follows: But, you may say, we asked you to speak about women and fiction—what has that got to do with a room of one’s own? By opening with "but" and a question Woolf...

Latest answer posted April 21, 2020, 12:15 am (UTC)

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