Questions and Answers for Roman Fever

Roman Fever

It is ironic that Grace Ansley and Alida Spade return together to Rome, the scene of their surreptitious rivalry. Now, twenty-five years later, it is their daughters who seem to risk "Roman...

Latest answer posted June 8, 2010 12:20 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Roman Fever

Edith Wharton's title "Roman Fever" is symbolic of the passionate hatred and jealousy felt by Alida Slade, as well as the sexual passion experienced by Delphin Slade and Grace Ansley. The name for...

Latest answer posted December 11, 2017 4:55 am UTC

2 educator answers

Roman Fever

The main conflict in the story is person versus person, or more specifically, woman versus woman. In the story, Mrs. Alida Slade and Mrs. Grace Ansley are rivals. In modern terms, we would call...

Latest answer posted July 20, 2018 7:05 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Roman Fever

Looking through the wrong end of the telescope reduces, rather than enlarges, an image. This phrase therefore means that each woman, Alida and Grace, is looking at the other in a way that...

Latest answer posted April 22, 2019 7:22 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Roman Fever

The double meaning of "Roman Fever" is that it refers literally to an feverish ailment to which one is susceptible in the cool air after sunset, and figuratively to a feverish battle for Delphin...

Latest answer posted September 11, 2016 2:34 am UTC

1 educator answer

Roman Fever

Alida Slade is characterized throughout "Roman Fever" as a jealous and spiteful person who wants to assert her superiority over her friend. For no reason except to hurt her old friend, Grace...

Latest answer posted April 24, 2019 12:59 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Roman Fever

The letter is at the heart of the deception that Mrs. Slade believed she perpetrated on Mrs. Ansley many years earlier when they were both in love with Delphin Slade. One of these women married...

Latest answer posted February 18, 2009 7:59 am UTC

1 educator answer

Roman Fever

As "Roman Fever" opens, Mrs. Slade considers herself superior to her old friend—or frenemy—Grace Ansley. She thinks of Mrs. Ansley and her late husband as "two nullities." She condescendingly...

Latest answer posted September 17, 2019 1:37 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Roman Fever

Edith Wharton's "Roman Fever" describes the interaction between Mrs. Slade and Mrs. Ansley as they sit on a Roman terrace. Their conversation is intermingled with the women's (especially Mrs....

Latest answer posted November 29, 2017 5:58 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Roman Fever

Edith Wharton’s short story “Roman Fever” is written in a third person omniscient point of view. This means that the narrator, and by extension, the readers, can see and hear the characters’...

Latest answer posted April 20, 2019 4:19 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Roman Fever

Mrs. Shade and Mrs. Ansley share a similar social background. They're both part of the gilded upper-class world that Edith Wharton wrote about so often. More importantly, Alida and Grace are linked...

Latest answer posted February 23, 2019 7:53 am UTC

2 educator answers

Roman Fever

It is important to realise that both Alida Slade and Grace Ansley now have a very different social role than they did when they were young and single and travelling in Rome together before. Now...

Latest answer posted October 4, 2011 7:56 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Roman Fever

The climax of "Roman Fever" comes as the two matrons sit watching the Roman sunset, recalling events of their first visit to Rome so long ago, and both friends reveal truths that shock the other....

Latest answer posted August 10, 2016 11:48 am UTC

1 educator answer

Roman Fever

The answer to this question can be found in the second section of this story, following the background we are given of these two women and their friendship. As they sit there watching the view...

Latest answer posted October 5, 2011 8:46 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Roman Fever

Certainly, the coliseum of Rome represents a well-developed society of ancient times, one against which the Gilded Age of America can be reflected as its notably named high society also placed its...

Latest answer posted May 24, 2013 5:18 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Roman Fever

The moral lesson of "Roman Fever" is that often one misjudges a person who is close. In the exposition of Wharton's story, Mrs. Slade, with dramatic irony, remarks, "Grace Ansley was always...

Latest answer posted October 29, 2009 12:42 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Roman Fever

Dramatic irony occurs when the audience knows what characters in a work of literature do not. "Roman Fever" does not precisely show dramatic irony, as the audience learns surprising pieces of news...

Latest answer posted October 30, 2019 11:47 am UTC

3 educator answers

Roman Fever

When Mrs. Slade was younger and her husband Delphin was still alive, every day was exciting; however, after her husband's death, she finds being Slade's widow a "dullish business." Mrs. Slade's...

Latest answer posted June 18, 2016 10:25 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Roman Fever

The discrepancy between what is spoken and what is privately thought represents the first hints of submerged conflict between the two women. Mrs. Slade unceremoniously thinks that Mrs. Ansley is...

Latest answer posted September 27, 2017 2:31 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Roman Fever

Wharton's story contains several tone shifts. 1. At the beginning of "Roman Fever," Wharton is reminiscent. She might even imagine herself as Mrs. Slade or Mrs. Ansley. The two women enjoy their...

Latest answer posted October 2, 2009 7:12 am UTC

1 educator answer

Roman Fever

Mrs. Slade and Mrs. Ansley have never had a close relationship. They lived across the street from one another, but there has always been animosity between them, although unspoken, so in a way, the...

Latest answer posted January 24, 2019 6:54 pm UTC

3 educator answers

Roman Fever

There are some very in-depth questions there, a bit much to answer all in the space I am provided. Therefore, I will deal with Q2 - the development and revelation of animosity of Mrs. Slade...

Latest answer posted December 7, 2007 10:29 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Roman Fever

"Roman Fever" reunites the traits that describe revenge literature at its very best. Using two women as main characters, Wharton effectively includes the basic elements of a love-hate relationship....

Latest answer posted July 30, 2012 7:06 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Roman Fever

Mrs. Slade has always been jealous of the beautiful and quietly composed Mrs. Ansley. She knew, when they were both young, that Mrs. Ansley, then single, was in love with her fiancé, Delphin. Now...

Latest answer posted June 25, 2020 9:13 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Roman Fever

In "Roman Fever," Edith Wharton expertly sets up the twist ending by spending a lot of time drawing such a sharp contrast in personality between Grace and Alida. Grace is presented to us as a...

Latest answer posted March 19, 2019 7:29 am UTC

2 educator answers

Roman Fever

Along with symbolic meaning, the suggestion of Barbara Ansley that she and Jenny Slade "...leave the young things to their knitting" contains much irony. For, the knitting to which Mrs. Slade and...

Latest answer posted March 27, 2011 11:16 am UTC

2 educator answers

Roman Fever

A most significant setting to Wharton's story, Rome is a city of passions much different from upper society's Victorian New York. Far removed from their own society, in Rome the Ansley and Spade...

Latest answer posted January 27, 2012 4:53 am UTC

1 educator answer

Roman Fever

Judging by the manner in which Edith Wharton characterizes Mrs. Slade and Mrs. Ansley, it is safe to say that it is not too difficult for a female reader to identify with either of the two. For...

Latest answer posted July 26, 2012 7:15 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Roman Fever

In his essay, "'Roman Fever': A Mortal Malady," Lawrence Berkove writes, Wharton’s genius, it turns out, is moral as well as aesthetic; the story...is a powerful exemplum about the dangerous...

Latest answer posted September 2, 2012 7:36 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Roman Fever

Naturalism as a literary movement moves away from the idea of a universe controlled by God in which people operate out of moral values. Instead, the genre depicts a mechanistic, Godless universe...

Latest answer posted July 22, 2020 2:50 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Roman Fever

Jenny is quiet and refined. She is the daughter of dynamic and powerful Mrs. Slade. Mrs. Slade had always wanted a daughter who was "brilliant" but got one who was "an angel." Barbara is bright...

Latest answer posted September 30, 2011 9:13 am UTC

1 educator answer

Roman Fever

There seem to be two main moral lessons that we can draw from this excellent and surprising tale. The first lies in the way in which Mrs. Slade completely underestimates her friend, Mrs. Ansley,...

Latest answer posted February 1, 2012 2:46 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Roman Fever

In her youth, Alida used Aunt Harriet's story as a rationale for her spiteful behavior. At present, she uses Aunt Harriet's story to put her past actions in a meaningful context for Grace. Alida...

Latest answer posted November 5, 2018 4:16 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Roman Fever

It helps us to understand that Mrs. Slade's opinion of Mrs. Ansley is very off-center. Mrs. Slade is a very domineering woman who is used to getting her way because of her wealth, and she assumes,...

Latest answer posted July 31, 2008 11:54 am UTC

1 educator answer

Roman Fever

The summary of Roman Fever is tricky, I find, because the women's names tend to swim together in my mind and their identities become blurred and confused. Having said this, the theme of Roman Fever...

Latest answer posted January 16, 2010 9:08 am UTC

1 educator answer

Roman Fever

The relative presence or absence of literary “realism” in the setting of Edith Wharton’s short story “Roman Fever” is an intriguing issue. The Cambridge Companion to Literature in English, edited...

Latest answer posted September 6, 2011 9:15 am UTC

1 educator answer

Roman Fever

The story is written to both describe and inform. Wharton describes the Roman ruins and the areas in Italy where the families visit and stay beautifully. She also describes the characters of the...

Latest answer posted March 4, 2008 1:07 am UTC

1 educator answer

Roman Fever

In one of her greater works of fiction, Edith Wharton portrays the class from which she herself came, the social elite of New York, to whom name and social status are all-important. Relationships...

Latest answer posted January 31, 2012 3:17 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Roman Fever

In ancient Rome, the Forum was the center for rituals and civic and political events. Also, because there were citizens of all levels present for these events, the forum was the heartbeat of Roman...

Latest answer posted April 26, 2016 6:31 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Roman Fever

One of the things I love about this story is that the resolution that Edith Wharton gives us seems not to represent a resolution at all in terms of the external conflict that Mrs. Ansley and Mrs....

Latest answer posted June 8, 2011 1:05 am UTC

1 educator answer

Roman Fever

Mrs. Slade and Mrs. Ansley have known each other for a long time. When they were young girls both competing for the attention of Delphin Slade, Mrs. Slade had hoped that Mrs. Ansley would catch...

Latest answer posted March 20, 2008 11:25 am UTC

1 educator answer

Roman Fever

At the start of Edith Wharton's "Roman Fever," the characters of Mrs. Slade and Mrs. Ansley are civil with each other but not especially warm. The two women knew each other as young girls and as...

Latest answer posted February 27, 2016 9:06 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Roman Fever

"Roman Fever," by Edith Wharton is a story about two close Victorian friends who do not know each other. These women revisit Rome years after their first youthful visit; this time they have their...

Latest answer posted October 29, 2009 12:06 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Roman Fever

In a story reflective of Old New York's stifled Victorian society, Mrs. Ansley and Mrs. Slade are thrown into intimacy simply by their social class because they differ markedly in personalities and...

Latest answer posted September 18, 2015 2:02 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Roman Fever

The author favors Mrs. Ansley over Mrs. Slade. Both women are equal socially, financially, but Mrs. Slade is bitter. Mrs. Ansley is sympathetic, genuine and sincere. When the discussion turns to...

Latest answer posted October 16, 2008 7:41 am UTC

1 educator answer

Roman Fever

Dramatic irony is a literary device whereby the reader knows something that the characters do not. At the same time, we cannot know too much, as that would spoil the ending. So a skillful author...

Latest answer posted October 14, 2017 12:12 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Roman Fever

Delphin Slade was clearly a very handsome, charismatic man. Otherwise, he wouldn't have been competing for the attention of not one, but two women at the same time. A wealthy, successful corporate...

Latest answer posted July 10, 2019 6:09 am UTC

2 educator answers

Roman Fever

A story reflective and yet contrary to the Old New York's stifled society, Mrs. Ansley and Mrs. Slade, rather than being truly friends, have been thrown into intimacy by their social class. They...

Latest answer posted March 27, 2011 3:24 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Roman Fever

Alida Slade makes no secret of the fact that she looks down on Grace. She sees her as a little mouse of a woman, who lacks the toughness and assertiveness to get what she wants in life. According...

Latest answer posted March 24, 2019 10:21 am UTC

1 educator answer

Roman Fever

In this short story, Mrs. Ansley is the only one of the women who knits. Knitting symbolizes her self-possession. Mrs. Ansley is a woman content with her life and able to produce good work....

Latest answer posted November 4, 2019 12:30 pm UTC

1 educator answer

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