Robert Frost Questions and Answers

Robert Frost

Robert Frost's "A Minor Bird" opens with a title which reflects man's inability to appreciate nature. The use of the word "minor" in the title shows the insignificance with which man regards...

Latest answer posted June 29, 2013, 2:41 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Robert Frost

Robert Frost is one of the most popular modern American poets. Because his career as a writer began to take hold just after the turn of the century, he can be considered one of the 20th century's...

Latest answer posted May 26, 2016, 12:01 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Robert Frost

This poem uses a form of iambic tetrameter, meaning that each line has four "feet." In actuality, what this means is that a person reading the poem aloud would naturally stress four syllables in...

Latest answer posted February 6, 2018, 9:35 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Robert Frost

On the surface, these poems seem to have quite a bit in common. Both have a speaker who is solitary, alone in nature. Both indicate what time of year in which they take place: "The Road Not...

Latest answer posted November 19, 2017, 3:28 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

Robert Frost

Given that Frost's poem "The Secret Sits" is a simple couplet (two lines of poetry) and written in anapest trimeter (anapest- a meter with a three syllable foot; trimeter- the existence of three...

Latest answer posted August 12, 2011, 11:38 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Robert Frost

The poem Fireflies in the Garden, by Robert Frost is an allegory to several things including the admiration of effort, the drawbacks of imitation, and the appreciation of differences. The...

Latest answer posted January 10, 2011, 10:50 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

Robert Frost

The tone of the end of the poem is curious and disappointed, and the mood is regretful and thoughtful. Tone is the author’s attitude toward the subject, and the mood is the emotional landscape of...

Latest answer posted April 30, 2013, 2:38 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Robert Frost

Imagery is using the five senses—sight, sound, touch, smell, and taste—to describe a scene. In "Nothing Gold can Stay," Frost uses visual and touch imagery: we can see and feel what he describes....

Latest answer posted August 15, 2018, 1:48 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

Robert Frost

"Nothing Gold Can Stay," by Robert Frost, is a poem about the illusory nature of life. This theme, that nothing of value ("nothing gold") will last forever, is substantiated through the imagery of...

Latest answer posted August 12, 2013, 6:48 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Robert Frost

The "glimpses" that the poem refers to are shown to be dazzling and beautiful glimpses of nature that truly point us towards the intense and inspirational beauties of the natural world that our...

Latest answer posted February 15, 2012, 1:52 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Robert Frost

Robert Frost’s “October” uses both its form and content to depict a moment in time right before fall gives way to winter. Although the poem takes the form of one stanza, it can be roughly split...

Latest answer posted November 1, 2017, 4:30 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

Robert Frost

The poem refers to the fact that sometimes beautiful things do not last long. They tend to be evanescent. Gold is of course associated with the precious metal. It is extremely valuable in this...

Latest answer posted September 24, 2015, 4:02 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Robert Frost

Frost's poems are often ambiguous and therefore lend themselves to a variety of interpretations. "Love and a Question" is no exception. The basic situation involves a stranger who approaches the...

Latest answer posted February 28, 2011, 7:21 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Robert Frost

Amidst the shirred remains of the harvested field, the speaker observes signs of the last remaining days of Autumn that part with the melancholy of the "sober birds" and the leaf that "Comes softly...

Latest answer posted October 15, 2011, 3:02 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

Robert Frost

Sorrow is personified in this poem, as the narrator refers to this emotion as a "she" who can "love" and "walk" and "talk," and so forth. Sorrow thinks that the "dark days of autumn rain" are...

Latest answer posted February 19, 2018, 2:53 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

Robert Frost

[Answers on eNotes are limited by available space.] Poetry analysis includes, among other things, structure and rhyme scheme; meter, which is feet and rhythm; theme, which requires knowing the...

Latest answer posted January 16, 2013, 12:43 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Robert Frost

The regular rhythm and simple structure of this poem, based on four-line stanzas, is suited to its topic: the simple activity of shoveling "mountains" of dried leaves. The poem's regularity echoes...

Latest answer posted April 5, 2018, 9:10 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Robert Frost

It is amazing the way in which loneliness occurs as a definite theme in so many of Frost's poems. My own personal favourite is "Acquainted with the Night," as mentioned above, in which the speaker...

Latest answer posted May 7, 2011, 4:42 am (UTC)

3 educator answers

Robert Frost

Frost is using the changing colors of the leaves to meditate on the continuing and unstoppable changes of life. Youth is presented as the golden age, the best of all times of life. "Nature's first...

Latest answer posted December 16, 2012, 2:04 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Robert Frost

Robert Frost was an American poet born in San Francisco, California at the end of the 19th century. He wrote a number of his most famous poems, including "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening,"...

Latest answer posted August 30, 2016, 1:33 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Robert Frost

This poem, like so many of Frost's poems, takes as its subject the beauty of nature. The title, "A Prayer in Spring," points towards the way in which this poem operates as a simple evocation of the...

Latest answer posted April 14, 2011, 8:39 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Robert Frost

Frost uses personification to describe the "resurrected tree" under which the poem's speaker sits and rests. The speaker identifies the tree using the male pronoun "he" and notes that its position...

Latest answer posted May 22, 2019, 8:48 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

Robert Frost

Three of the many features that are often present in Robert Frost's poems are a) a simple rhyme scheme, b) everyday language, c) multiple symbolic meanings. For example, take the opening stanza...

Latest answer posted October 12, 2015, 7:16 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Robert Frost

In "Mending Wall," the speaker considers telling his neighbor, "Something there is that doesn't love a wall, / That wants it down." In other words, he has a desire not to be restricted; he does not...

Latest answer posted March 7, 2018, 12:45 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

Robert Frost

The theme of "Once by the Ocean" is the inevitable passing of time and its slow destruction. There is a heavily foreboding tone established at the outset of the piece. The water and waves "shatter"...

Latest answer posted February 12, 2011, 7:16 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Robert Frost

The tone or mood of Frost's poem is ominous and threatening, creating a mood of unease or anxiety about the future. Nature is portrayed as planning, with deliberate, evil intent, to harm the...

Latest answer posted March 18, 2019, 1:29 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

Robert Frost

Robert Frost's poem “I Could Give All to Time” focuses first on the unfeeling nature of time. People often attribute emotional characteristics to time, but according to the speaker, time is not...

Latest answer posted October 14, 2021, 4:41 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Robert Frost

Both poems make use of nature imagery, as the other educator wrote. In "Nothing Gold Can Stay," "Nature's first green" makes us visualize spring and the explosion of green that occurs when winter...

Latest answer posted June 19, 2018, 1:11 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

Robert Frost

Tone is the attitude of the writer/narrator about a particular subject. The tone is generally conveyed through the word choice of the writer. In this poem, the tone isn't the same throughout. Frost...

Latest answer posted January 25, 2018, 11:56 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Robert Frost

Robert Frost's "The Runaway" is a short poem that describes the specific scene of a young horse being first exposed to snow. The horse appears to be running away because he is afraid. The two...

Latest answer posted March 28, 2018, 2:34 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Robert Frost

At first glance, Robert Frost doesn’t seem to have much in common with the experimental poetry of the Modernist writers; his poetry often relies on traditional forms, rhymes, and blank verse. Frost...

Latest answer posted May 3, 2018, 11:38 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

Robert Frost

The question posed in Robert Frost's "The Oven Bird" is found in the last line of the poem. What to make of a diminished thing. The body of the poem speaks to everything a bird has seen and how...

Latest answer posted September 19, 2011, 9:34 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Robert Frost

Robert Frost's poem "Peck of Gold" looks back at his childhood in San Francisco and focuses on the dust that seemingly covered everything. In the poem, he uses the dust as both a symbol of the...

Latest answer posted November 15, 2017, 4:26 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Robert Frost

Two “individuals” who might be said to pursue individual well-being in Robert Frost’s poem “Come In” are the bird and the man who listens to the bird. The bird might be said to pursue individual...

Latest answer posted July 12, 2011, 1:30 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Robert Frost

In "Going for Water," childhood innocence is expressed primarily through the children's identification with the natural world around them. Because they enjoy such a close relationship with nature...

Latest answer posted April 21, 2020, 10:54 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Robert Frost

Robert Frost's poem "A Late Night Walk" is a lyric poem of the variation called ballad. Lyric poems come in several varieties including sonnets and ballads. Each variety of lyric poem has its own...

Latest answer posted October 10, 2010, 4:08 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

Robert Frost

As noted in the previous answer, the rhyme scheme follows the ABAB pattern. What is interesting, too, about the rhythm of this poem is that it adds to the meaning. Because the task that Frost is...

Latest answer posted January 5, 2016, 9:24 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

Robert Frost

Frost's allusion to the Garden of Eden story is meant to remind us that the idea that nothing lasts forever isn't a new one; it goes right back to the very dawn of civilization. We might like to...

Latest answer posted December 24, 2018, 12:20 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

Robert Frost

The speaker is commenting upon what he sees in the last days of autumn. The use of the adjective "late" in the title might indicate that it is late in the year as autumn approaches winter. The...

Latest answer posted June 28, 2016, 8:17 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Robert Frost

Robert Frost once wrote, "In three words, I can sum up everything I've learned about life: It goes on." Frost's belief about the continuation of life is reflected in his detailing of nature. This...

Latest answer posted July 15, 2014, 2:38 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Robert Frost

The title of the poem reveals the subject. The poet is critiquing the upheaval that the line gang's installation of telegraph and telegram lines is bringing to his once quiet and undisturbed rural...

Latest answer posted September 7, 2018, 7:50 pm (UTC)

3 educator answers

Robert Frost

Figurative language is any language that goes beyond the literal. It can add extra meaning or it can be used for emphasis or effect. Frost uses anastrophe in "The Pasture." Anastrophe is changing...

Latest answer posted October 14, 2018, 12:54 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

Robert Frost

One of my favorite Frost poems, "The Death of the Hired Man," seems to have been written with this question in mind :). Early in the poem Warren is grousing about Silas' returning home...

Latest answer posted September 11, 2008, 12:28 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

Robert Frost

Both of these famous poems by Robert Frost could be interpreted in many ways, but one common theme seems to be choices—especially how we feel about our choices after the fact. We're normally...

Latest answer posted October 8, 2018, 4:54 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

Robert Frost

The poem "Going for Water" by Robert Frost is narrated in the first person plural (probably by children). The narrators live in a rural environment and rely on a well for their water. Because the...

Latest answer posted July 16, 2018, 6:22 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Robert Frost

Frost begins the poem with a contrast that is precise and man-made, sitting indoors and talking ''of the cold outside." The precarious nature of the warmth and comfort which the subjects of the...

Latest answer posted February 10, 2020, 11:38 am (UTC)

4 educator answers

Robert Frost

In "House Fear" by Robert Frost, the poem supports that fear causes people to behave irrationally. In this poem, the person on the outside of the locked door does make noise while prolonging the...

Latest answer posted August 30, 2011, 4:38 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Robert Frost

Both "Birches" and "The Road Not Taken" are naturalist poems that deal with interactions between man and nature. More specifically, they use nature to explore man's contemplation of choices made in...

Latest answer posted April 30, 2016, 4:27 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Robert Frost

The theme of a poem can be defined as its message to the reader. In the poem "Love and A Question," the speaker of the poem may be telling the reader that few decisions are straightforward, even...

Latest answer posted August 20, 2018, 9:12 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

Robert Frost

There are all sorts of ways to critically appreciate this poem. You can start by looking at where the poem first appears and what form of poem it is. With just a little digging, I found that...

Latest answer posted January 9, 2010, 10:57 pm (UTC)

3 educator answers

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