Roald Dahl Questions and Answers

Roald Dahl

In "The Wish," a boy pulls a scab painlessly off his knee and flings it away. It lands in the distance on a carpet in the hall of his house that is in a pattern of red, black, and yellow. The boy...

Latest answer posted November 27, 2020 2:54 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Roald Dahl

Roald Dahl has a humorous writing style for children. He is very creative, using unique adjectives in his descriptive writing. Dahl uses figures of speech in his writing: He uses specific names...

Latest answer posted June 21, 2011 3:10 am UTC

1 educator answer

Roald Dahl

One possible interpretation of the story is to see it as an illustration of the famous maxim "what goes around, comes around." Mrs. Bixby has been cheating on her husband, cynically using him just...

Latest answer posted March 17, 2018 9:26 am UTC

2 educator answers

Roald Dahl

The house is cheerily decorated, particularly with yellow chrysanthemums. Billy is looking for a cheap place to stay, and the “Bell and Dragon” is recommended to him. However, he catches sight of...

Latest answer posted September 3, 2015 3:52 am UTC

1 educator answer

Roald Dahl

In the short story "The Wish" by Roald Dahl, a young boy merely needs to cross a carpet to the front door and go outside where his mother is waiting for him. However, this child has a lively...

Latest answer posted December 16, 2020 3:38 am UTC

1 educator answer

Roald Dahl

Climax refers to the highest point in the development of a story. As such, the climax in this story lies in Harry Pope's completely unexpected tirade against doctor Ganderbai. His reaction to the...

Latest answer posted January 25, 2016 6:27 pm UTC

3 educator answers

Roald Dahl

In the story, Harry claimed that there was a krait on his stomach and when the doctor and Timber realized there was nothing, Harry became defensive and insulted the doctor. Harry claimed that the...

Latest answer posted November 13, 2015 2:30 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Roald Dahl

"The Wish" concerns a young boy's fantasy in which his carpet is alive with snakes and fire, and he must traverse it to win a prize: a puppy for his birthday. This is a common type of magical...

Latest answer posted December 11, 2012 8:07 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Roald Dahl

"Television" is a poem written by Roald Dahl, who is most famous for having written Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, The BFG, and James and the Giant Peach. Roald Dahl was a British author who...

Latest answer posted November 26, 2017 3:26 am UTC

1 educator answer

Roald Dahl

Matilda, written by Roald Dahl, is a novel about a small girl named Matilda. Matilda is an extremely bright young girl but is ignored by her mean parents. In the beginning of the novel, readers...

Latest answer posted May 2, 2019 6:13 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Roald Dahl

Roald Dahl's "The Wish" is about self-confidence overcoming fear rather than about greed. Admittedly, "greed," the desire for a puppy, is a motivating factor. However, the puppy motivator is a...

Latest answer posted December 1, 2020 1:53 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Roald Dahl

Harry--his motivation is the mystery. Harry is the antagonist, the one who causes conflict for the protagonist. The ambiguity in the story, that starts in medias res, makes it difficult to know...

Latest answer posted October 10, 2011 12:00 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Roald Dahl

The BFG takes place in modern-day England, as well as in Giant Country. In Giant Country, the Giant lives in a cave within a mountainside, whose entrance is protected by a large round stone. Giant...

Latest answer posted January 7, 2017 2:37 am UTC

2 educator answers

Roald Dahl

The mother has just realized what the old man has been up to all along: he is a con artist who steals people's umbrellas and goes out into the street, where he accosts unsuspecting passersby and...

Latest answer posted December 19, 2019 10:39 am UTC

1 educator answer

Roald Dahl

The author chose to tell "The Umbrella Man" from the point of view of a twelve-year-old girl because what happens seems innocuous and humorous as seen through her innocent eyes. The story opens...

Latest answer posted March 9, 2015 11:43 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Roald Dahl

At the beginning of the book, Roald Dahl tells the reader that Matilda Wormwood is one of the few examples of a child that is disliked by her parents. What makes it tragic, however, is that Matilda...

Latest answer posted June 7, 2020 12:03 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Roald Dahl

Obsession is undoubtedly one of the main themes in this remarkable short story. Klausner's experiments with the sound machine start off as just a harmless bit of fun. But as he penetrates deeper...

Latest answer posted August 20, 2019 9:27 am UTC

1 educator answer

Roald Dahl

Roald Dahl's short story "The Hitchhiker" contains only three characters: the narrator (who, like Dahl himself, is a successful writer), the hitchhiker, and the policeman. The narrator picks up the...

Latest answer posted August 22, 2020 1:41 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Roald Dahl

In "The Way Up to Heaven," the author uses the common third-person anonymous narrator with the point of view limited to a single character, Mrs. Foster. The narrator is seemingly omniscient but...

Latest answer posted August 30, 2016 1:23 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Roald Dahl

The hitchhiker describes himself as a fingersmith, which is a euphemism for "pickpocket." The hitchhiker doesn't like to call himself a pickpocket as it's a word he associates with coarse and...

Latest answer posted July 9, 2018 8:58 am UTC

1 educator answer

Roald Dahl

While the themes of this short story by Roald Dahl can be difficult to identify, there are two which are the most evident. First, it is clear that the father loves the baby very much, which is why...

Latest answer posted May 23, 2016 8:49 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Roald Dahl

Young Billy Weaver has never visited the beautiful city of Bath before, so naturally doesn't know his way around. All he knows as his train pulls into the station is that he needs to find some...

Latest answer posted November 12, 2019 9:00 am UTC

1 educator answer

Roald Dahl

The story "The Sound Machine" by Roald Dahl is the tale of an inventor, Klausner, who extends the range of human hearing by creating a machine that can translate sounds made by plants into sounds...

Latest answer posted January 29, 2020 2:30 am UTC

1 educator answer

Roald Dahl

Ever since his first children’s book, The Gremlins, was published in 1943, Roald Dahl has been a smash hit with children the world over. Surviving the test of time, Dahl's works continue to...

Latest answer posted October 26, 2019 12:31 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Roald Dahl

The basic concept of Roald Dahl's Going Solo is to continue the autobiographical narrative that Dahl starts in the publication of his first autobiography titled Boy. In the book Boy, Roald Dahl...

Latest answer posted December 24, 2011 10:21 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Roald Dahl

A narrative is a story or plotline. In Dahl's poem, he retells the Cinderella fairytale to make it scarier or more "gory," saying that the story that has come down to us is sanitized and "sappy" to...

Latest answer posted January 9, 2019 3:57 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Roald Dahl

Roald Dahl has a very refreshing and irreverent writing style, which is partly the reason that children love it so much and respond to his books so enthusiastically. For example, in his book of...

Latest answer posted March 6, 2010 8:47 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Roald Dahl

As a children's book of magical fantasy, The Giraffe and the Pelly and Me is not a work of deep literary significance; as such, it contains simple writing and simple characterization. One...

Latest answer posted January 15, 2013 10:34 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Roald Dahl

Throughout the story, Harry lies still in bed while a poisonous snake sleeps on his stomach, beneath his pyjama top. Meanwhile, a Hindu doctor named Ganderbai is called to the scene late at night,...

Latest answer posted August 11, 2019 5:22 am UTC

1 educator answer

Roald Dahl

For your project it is more than acceptable to say that, since Going Solo is a continuation of "Boy", it is understandably a more complex memoir which focuses on the complexities of becoming a...

Latest answer posted May 31, 2009 9:04 am UTC

1 educator answer

Roald Dahl

When the story begins, Mary is eagerly awaiting the return of her husband. The narrator describes the scene of a cosy, comfortably family home and Mary is completely enamored with her husband,...

Latest answer posted October 20, 2013 10:19 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Roald Dahl

"Poison"--like many of Roald Dahl's stories--has quite simple diction. Dahl, whose diction is similar to Ernest Hemingway's in its conciseness, focuses more on building suspense and...

Latest answer posted November 21, 2009 5:16 am UTC

1 educator answer

Roald Dahl

The protagonist of "The Sound Machine" is a rather eccentric man by the name of Klausner. He has an obsession with sound, and he is absolutely convinced that there are many sounds in the world that...

Latest answer posted August 3, 2018 11:31 am UTC

1 educator answer

Roald Dahl

The theme in Roald Dahl's short story, The Way Up to Heaven is implication. This work is included in a collection of short stories titled, Kiss Kiss. The stories in that collection deal with the...

Latest answer posted November 30, 2009 3:10 am UTC

1 educator answer

Roald Dahl

We need to understand how the education system in England is different from the education system in the United States. In the US, you guys start in Pre-Kinder, and then go into Kindergarten, then...

Latest answer posted September 22, 2011 8:20 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Roald Dahl

Although the story is told from the third person point of view (he, she, they, etc...), it is presented in such a way as to represent Mrs Foster's feelings more than her husband's. The reader...

Latest answer posted November 24, 2008 12:36 am UTC

1 educator answer

Roald Dahl

As #2 establishes, it is all about the underdog. Matilda is a character who has everything going against her, yet somehow manages to rise up above impossible odds to achieve that happy ending. The...

Latest answer posted April 26, 2011 3:43 am UTC

2 educator answers

Roald Dahl

I think it would be proper to call the sub-genre into which "Lamb to the Slaughter" fits a "perfect crime story." In this case the protagonist commits a murder and gets away with it. But the...

Latest answer posted April 21, 2016 6:35 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Roald Dahl

Great question! While most readers assume at first glance that the title of "Poison" refers to the alleged snake that is ready to strike Harry, Dahl actually intends for the title to figuratively...

Latest answer posted November 30, 2009 5:02 am UTC

1 educator answer

Roald Dahl

Tibbs the butler comes across as a bit of a snob, despite the lowly position he occupies on the social ladder. One gets the distinct impression that he's used to serving the cream of society, the...

Latest answer posted February 27, 2021 10:20 am UTC

1 educator answer

Roald Dahl

Roald Dahl's life reads like a storybook, but there were sadder moments interspersed with times of adventure and great joy. Dahl seemed to be the living proof that nobody's life is cut out in...

Latest answer posted February 14, 2009 4:10 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Roald Dahl

You have chosen two excellent stories to compare, as both focus on how some people are able to trick others into taking advantage of them in some way. What is interesting about both the man who...

Latest answer posted July 3, 2011 8:56 am UTC

1 educator answer

Roald Dahl

The short story "Lamb to the Slaughter" by Roald Dahl begins with a description of a seemingly happy marriage. Mary Maloney sits alone in her living room eagerly waiting for her husband to come...

Latest answer posted August 5, 2016 1:47 am UTC

1 educator answer

Roald Dahl

The author does not give us much information about why Patrick is leaving his wife: And I know it's a tough time to be telling you this, but there simply wasn't any other way. Of course, I'll...

Latest answer posted March 10, 2016 3:45 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Roald Dahl

How about these: 1. Who is Matilda? 2. What is special about Matillda? 3. How does she deal with her situation at home? 4. What seems to be Roald Dahl's opinion of watching TV? 5. What...

Latest answer posted June 11, 2009 10:58 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Roald Dahl

There is a film version of "Danny the Champion of the World" with Jeremy Irons. There is also an animated version of "The BFG" (though I believe it is called "The Big...

Latest answer posted October 25, 2008 2:50 am UTC

2 educator answers

Roald Dahl

This is a difficult question. In the two stories being analyzed, the Umbrella Man is more successful, but he is taking many risks. He does not seem to have a long career ahead of him. First of all,...

Latest answer posted July 25, 2013 12:35 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Roald Dahl

Roald Dahl was a Welsh fighter pilot, poet, and author of children's novels who lived from 1916 to 1990. He is, perhaps, one of the most influential literary figures of the 20th century, having...

Latest answer posted June 26, 2016 11:11 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Roald Dahl

I'd say that she is very self-reliant and tough. I do not think you could have described her this way at the start of the story. At the start, she seemed like someone who totally relied on her...

Latest answer posted November 2, 2010 3:07 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Roald Dahl

The climax of the story begins when the three friends, after getting an invitation to Hampshire House to clean up the Duchess's windows in her bedroom, they spot a burglar who breaks in and tries...

Latest answer posted January 3, 2010 5:16 am UTC

1 educator answer

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