Richard Lovelace Questions and Answers

Richard Lovelace

'Stone Walls Do Not A Prison Make' by Richard Lovelace. In very brief summary, these lines from the poem by Richard Lovelace mean that it takes more than physical limits to imprison a person's mind...

Latest answer posted November 18, 2009 11:05 pm UTC

3 educator answers

Richard Lovelace

This poem is a passionate expression of sexual love. The speaker admires the beauty of Amarantha (specifically her hair) after they have had sex. In the first stanza of the poem, the speaker...

Latest answer posted April 6, 2019 1:31 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Richard Lovelace

Overall, the poem is a declaration of independence that some might interpret as being almost defiant. The speaker is imprisoned, away from the woman he loves because of his loyalty to the King...

Latest answer posted April 23, 2012 11:00 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Richard Lovelace

A courtier of King Charles I, Lovelace, this Cavalier poet, wrote this famous and oft quoted stanza describing what can not bind freedom and offering an analogy showing what can experience freedom...

Latest answer posted April 24, 2012 12:28 am UTC

1 educator answer

Richard Lovelace

When (like committed linnets) I With shriller throat shall singThe sweetness, Mercy, Majesty, And glories of my King;When I shall voice aloud how good He is, how Great should...

Latest answer posted April 24, 2012 1:28 am UTC

1 educator answer

Richard Lovelace

When flowing Cups run swiftly round With no allaying Thames,Our careless heads with Roses bound, Our hearts with Loyal Flames;When thirsty grief in Wine we steep, When Healths and...

Latest answer posted April 24, 2012 2:49 am UTC

1 educator answer

Richard Lovelace

The third stanza of Richard Lovelace’s poem titled “To Althea, from Prison,” reads as follows: When (like committed linnets) I With shriller throat shall sing The sweetness, Mercy, Majesty,...

Latest answer posted April 8, 2012 10:02 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Richard Lovelace

The first stanza of Richard Lovelace’s poem titled “To Althea, from Prison” reads as follows: When Love with unconfinèd wings Hovers within my Gates, And my divine Althea brings To whisper...

Latest answer posted April 8, 2012 9:24 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Richard Lovelace

1984--In Orwell's novel, Winston Smith (the protagonist) is eventually arrested and confined in a literal prison. However, he spends much of the novel being imprisoned by fear of and enslavement...

Latest answer posted March 3, 2010 9:15 am UTC

3 educator answers

Richard Lovelace

The second stanza of Richard Lovelace’s poem “To Althea, from Prison” reads as follows: When flowing Cups run swiftly round With no allaying Thames, [10] Our careless heads with Roses...

Latest answer posted April 8, 2012 9:43 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Richard Lovelace

In Richard Lovelace's poem, "To Althea, from Prison," the poet "does" several things. Paradoxically, this poem discusses the contradictions between the sense of captivity and freedom. The author...

Latest answer posted February 14, 2011 8:41 am UTC

1 educator answer

Richard Lovelace

The first stanza presents the basic thesis of the entire poem - the speaker is free in his mind and spirit to remember his love and his lover, even as his body is confined in prison. So long as his...

Latest answer posted April 23, 2012 10:51 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Richard Lovelace

The opening stanza of Richard Lovelace’s poem “To Althea, from Prison” can be explicated as follows: WHEN love with unconfined wings When Cupid, the classical god of love (who is usually...

Latest answer posted April 20, 2012 9:50 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Richard Lovelace

Stanza II runs as follows: When flowing Cups run swiftly round With no allaying Thames,Our carelesse heads with Roses bound, Our hearts with Loyall Flames ;When thirsty griefe in Wine we...

Latest answer posted April 23, 2012 6:43 pm UTC

1 educator answer