Revelation Questions and Answers

Revelation

Mary Grace's Human Development book is a psychology textbook often used in college psychology classes. O'Connor's use of it in the story is ironic because Mary Grace, who apparently suffers from...

Latest answer posted February 8, 2009 2:32 am UTC

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Revelation

In Flannery O'Connor’s short story “Revelation” (published posthumously in Everything That Rises Must Converge, 1965), the primary settings—the doctor’s waiting room and the pig parlor—are...

Latest answer posted October 3, 2019 3:42 am UTC

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Revelation

It appears that people in the doctor's waiting room were sitting quietly until Mrs. Turpin comes in with her husband Claud and begins to talking to others in the room. We learn that Mary Grace is...

Latest answer posted December 27, 2019 2:06 pm UTC

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Revelation

Pigs, hogs, and even warthogs are used symbolically in various ways in Flannery O’Connor’s short story titled “Revelation.” Among those ways are the following: They function as symbols of pride....

Latest answer posted July 15, 2011 9:09 am UTC

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Revelation

Flannery O’Connor writes about the south and its unique flavor of life. The name of the story “Revelations” has several meanings: disclosure, shock, and eye-opener. All of these meanings apply in...

Latest answer posted March 24, 2013 4:40 pm UTC

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Revelation

Almost certainly the key “turning point” in Flannery O’Connor’s short story titled “Revelation” is the moment when Mary Grace, boiling over with anger, literally throws the book at Mrs. Turpin,...

Latest answer posted July 15, 2011 12:40 pm UTC

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Revelation

The protagonist of "Revelation," a short story by Flannery O’Connor, is Mrs. Ruby Turpin, a middle-class white Southern woman who is almost a caricature of narrow class and racial prejudices. The...

Latest answer posted February 20, 2017 9:55 am UTC

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Revelation

Short Answer: Mary Grace's message to "Go back to hell where you came from, you old wart hog" strikes the "target" of Mrs. Turpin because this woman is such a self-righteous hypocrite. Mary Grace,...

Latest answer posted February 10, 2015 10:40 am UTC

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Revelation

The doctor’s waiting room and pig parlor are appropriate places for Mrs. Turpin’s revelations because they are both places where she puts her needs above those of others. In the doctor’s office,...

Latest answer posted January 31, 2013 9:45 pm UTC

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Revelation

While in the doctor's waiting room, Mrs. Turpin notes that the well-dressed lady wears red and gray suede shoes, while her ugly daughter wears Girl Scout shoes with heavy socks, the old lady is in...

Latest answer posted October 3, 2019 12:09 pm UTC

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Revelation

Flannery O’Connor uses references to pigs, hogs, and even warthogs in her story “Revelation” in various ways. Here are a number of ways in which such references are employed: The hogs are among the...

Latest answer posted June 27, 2011 1:23 pm UTC

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Revelation

Mrs. Turpin, the protagonist in Flannery O’Connor’s short story "Revelation," could be said to represent humanity. Neither entirely good—she is racist and judgmental—nor evil (she wants more than...

Latest answer posted November 13, 2017 3:10 am UTC

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Revelation

Flannery O’Connor’s Roman Catholic beliefs color her stories which include violence and violent people alongside the faith and grace found by many of her characters. “Good Country People” and...

Latest answer posted June 23, 2013 7:59 pm UTC

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Revelation

Mrs. Turpin's treatment of her husband shows that she is a bossy woman who is accustomed to people not fighting back against her behavior. She also, however, shows signs that she loves Claud...

Latest answer posted October 31, 2018 5:07 pm UTC

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Revelation

The “abysmal life-giving knowledge” is that Mrs. Turpin has a sobering and deep revelation about how she has been living her life. The word abysmal has a double meaning. It can mean depressing,...

Latest answer posted January 31, 2013 6:31 pm UTC

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Revelation

A moment of grace in "Revelation" has to do with the behavior of the young woman who literally and figuratively throws the book at Mrs. Turpin. Throughout the period when the group is waiting for...

Latest answer posted March 4, 2020 2:25 am UTC

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Revelation

In "Revelation," Flannery O'Connor leverages humor and violence as methods of humbling her main character, Mrs. Turpin. When we meet Mrs. Turpin, we're introduced to a larger-than-life woman whose...

Latest answer posted February 3, 2020 9:39 pm UTC

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Revelation

In O'Connor's stories, the main characters usually do not perceive things accurately, but in the course of the narrative, truths are revealed to them that change their perceptions. These truths...

Latest answer posted June 20, 2013 7:46 am UTC

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Revelation

Flannery O’Connor’s views about race are reflected in a number of her stories, especially “Everything That Rises Must Converge.” Those views are also relevant, however, to her story titled...

Latest answer posted October 30, 2011 4:10 pm UTC

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Revelation

“Revelation,” like much of Flannery O’Connor’s fiction, deals with the central Christian sin of pride. “Pride” in this sense means selfishness, self-centeredness, and a failure to recognize and...

Latest answer posted June 27, 2011 3:31 am UTC

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Revelation

The word “revelation” can have a double meaning. First of all, it means a personal revelation. Second of all, it means a religious experience. There is evidence that Mrs. Turpin had a religious...

Latest answer posted January 31, 2013 8:19 pm UTC

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Revelation

Mrs. Turpin’s stereotypes of class and race demonstrate her ignorance. Mrs. Turpin is obsessed with classes of people. She considers colored people at “the bottom of the heap,” followed by what...

Latest answer posted January 31, 2013 9:23 pm UTC

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Revelation

The quote comes from the last line of the story: In woods around her the invisible cricket choruses had struck up, but what she heard were the voices of the souls climbing upward into the starry...

Latest answer posted December 14, 2017 10:39 pm UTC

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Revelation

Mrs. Turpin puts her needs above those of others, and her opinions over those of others. If it is not happening to her, it is not important. When the old woman talks to Mrs. Turpin, even those...

Latest answer posted January 31, 2013 10:02 pm UTC

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Revelation

Much of the humor in the story is provided by Mrs. Turpin's thoughts while in the doctor's waiting room. The other potential for comedy is writing a group of strangers together in a small space and...

Latest answer posted February 2, 2020 7:26 pm UTC

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Revelation

Mrs. Turpin, in Flannery O'Connor's "Revelation," has a clear sense of where people belong within society's hierarchy. She is forever having conversations in her mind and with Jesus about where she...

Latest answer posted July 4, 2011 2:40 pm UTC

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Revelation

There is some evidence that Mary Grace is being used as a vessel from God. First of all, it does seem as though Mrs. Turpin is not one who would be normally listening to someone like Mary Grace....

Latest answer posted January 31, 2013 7:39 pm UTC

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Revelation

Flannery O’Connor often writes stories set in the South in which characters are given opportunities for grace and divine forgiveness. Sometimes those opportunities come in very strange ways....

Latest answer posted April 6, 2012 5:44 am UTC

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Revelation

O’Connor wrote about the south because it was the region of the country she knew best. She had been born and bred in the south and was intimately familiar with its people and culture. (She also...

Latest answer posted July 15, 2011 10:39 am UTC

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Revelation

In Flannery O’Connor’s short story titled “Revelation,” the relationship between Mary Grace and her mother is strained, to say the least. The mother (often called “the pleasant lady”) and Mary...

Latest answer posted July 15, 2011 11:14 am UTC

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Revelation

Like many of Flannery O’Connor’s stories, “Revelation” can be read as an extended fictional sermon on the sin of pride. Throughout the story, various characters – but especially Mrs. Turpin –...

Latest answer posted July 15, 2011 12:13 pm UTC

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Revelation

A generalized theme for “Revelation” is the danger of assuming you are better than everyone else. A generalized theme is the overall message for the story. It is the reason the author wrote it....

Latest answer posted January 31, 2013 6:17 pm UTC

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Revelation

Both protragonists are blind to the truth because they think they are being singled out for something special. Mrs. Turpin thinks she is receiving a revelation; with its religious connotations,...

Latest answer posted December 3, 2009 3:42 am UTC

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Revelation

The most important element of Mrs. Turpin’s vision in the garden is the staircase to Heaven populated by “white trash” and Negros. During her visit to the doctor’s office, something strange happens...

Latest answer posted January 31, 2013 9:32 pm UTC

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Revelation

There are especially two aspects of Mrs. Turpin's treatment of Claud that reveal her characterization. First: she includes him in her self-aggrandizing thoughts about how superior she and her are...

Latest answer posted June 11, 2013 10:56 pm UTC

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Revelation

The message in the story is that you should not hold yourself above others. The message is delivered through the disagreeable Mrs. Turpin, who is racist, arrogant, and just plain rude. The reason...

Latest answer posted January 31, 2013 7:06 pm UTC

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Revelation

There is no specific date given as the setting for the story, though there are several clues that place it sometime between the holocaust and the actual date of its publication, 1965. Ms. Turpin...

Latest answer posted April 21, 2010 8:43 pm UTC

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Revelation

In Flannery O’Connor’s short story titled “Revelation,” internal and external ugliness are compared and contrasted in various ways. Here are some examples: Claud has an ugly sore on his leg, but...

Latest answer posted July 15, 2011 11:46 am UTC

1 educator answer

Revelation

The biography of Flannery O’Connor is definitely relevant to understanding her short story "Revelation." O'Connor was from the same geographic region that she is writing about in the story, the...

Latest answer posted February 11, 2020 9:28 pm UTC

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