A Red, Red Rose Questions and Answers

A Red, Red Rose

Burns is expressing romantic love in "A Red, Red Rose." As the poem's title indicates, he is at the height of being head-over-heels in love. The red, red rose is a metaphor for his feeling of his...

Latest answer posted November 7, 2018 7:25 pm UTC

2 educator answers

A Red, Red Rose

"A Red, Red Rose" is about the power of love over the inevitable passage of time. The speaker stresses his adoration for the object of his desire as he takes leave of her (the reader is never told...

Latest answer posted July 14, 2020 12:00 pm UTC

4 educator answers

A Red, Red Rose

One of the first literary devices we notice as we read this simple poem is Burns's use of Scottish dialect: we can almost hear a Scottish brogue in words like "gang" for going and "weel" for well....

Latest answer posted January 17, 2021 11:49 am UTC

4 educator answers

A Red, Red Rose

The most important figure of speech in this poem is the simile, which compares two different things using the words "like" or "as." In the first stanza, the speaker compares his love ("Luve") to a...

Latest answer posted June 11, 2013 5:22 pm UTC

1 educator answer

A Red, Red Rose

Robert Burns makes use of similes throughout the poem "A Red, Red Rose," using comparisons to nature to represent the durability and immensity of the speaker’s love. The poem begins by saying...

Latest answer posted April 16, 2020 10:58 am UTC

4 educator answers

A Red, Red Rose

As the other answers to this question note, a metaphor in Robert Burns's poem occurs at the end of the third stanza in the "sands of life" line. I'd like to expand upon one of the implications of...

Latest answer posted October 13, 2016 8:49 pm UTC

2 educator answers

A Red, Red Rose

In the poem "A Red, Red Rose," Robert Burns promises his eternal love to his "bonnie lass" and that no matter how far he might go, he will always return to her side.

Latest answer posted March 3, 2016 8:19 pm UTC

2 educator answers

A Red, Red Rose

The speaker says that his love is "like a red, red rose, / That's newly sprung in June." This is what's called a simile, a figure of speech that compares one thing to another of a very different...

Latest answer posted August 29, 2018 5:43 am UTC

1 educator answer

A Red, Red Rose

The separation here is not a literal trip. Instead, Burns is using the traditional idea of separation from a love to underscore the tenderness and purity of the speaker's feelings for his beloved....

Latest answer posted January 15, 2016 7:18 pm UTC

1 educator answer

A Red, Red Rose

The speaker expresses his undying love for his beloved in the following ways: First, he compares her to a beautiful red rose. This in itself does not speak to undying love, but the speaker goes on...

Latest answer posted July 19, 2019 5:06 pm UTC

1 educator answer

A Red, Red Rose

The sands o’ life refer to time. The speaker is saying he will still love his girl even after she is old and has lost her beauty. This is a typical love poem in which the speaker talks about how...

Latest answer posted May 13, 2014 11:45 pm UTC

1 educator answer

A Red, Red Rose

Imagery is description using any of the five sense of sight, sound, taste, touch, and smell. In this poem, the narrator uses imagery when he compares his love to a "red, red rose" that is newly...

Latest answer posted October 17, 2019 12:06 am UTC

1 educator answer

A Red, Red Rose

One literary device Burns makes heavy use of in this poem is anaphora. Anaphora occurs when the words at the beginning of a line are repeated. In "A Red, Red Rose," this happens, for example, in...

Latest answer posted March 31, 2019 4:37 pm UTC

3 educator answers

A Red, Red Rose

In the poem "A Red, Red Rose" by Robert Burns, the poet spends the first three stanzas praising his sweetheart and professing eternal love. In the last stanza, he indicates that he must go away but...

Latest answer posted May 7, 2020 5:14 pm UTC

3 educator answers

A Red, Red Rose

The poem is the speaker's ode to his beloved. In the first stanza, the tone is celebratory. The speaker compares his love to a rose at the height of its vibrancy and color; this is why "red" is...

Latest answer posted April 10, 2013 6:48 pm UTC

1 educator answer

A Red, Red Rose

The short answer: Yes. Standardized spelling is something very new to the English language, as strange as that may seem to us. Go back just two hundred years or so and you'll see people spelling...

Latest answer posted October 12, 2010 12:13 am UTC

1 educator answer

A Red, Red Rose

The structure of this poem is four four lined stanzas, while the rhyme scheme varies in the first half and the second half. In the first two stanzas, the second and fourth lines rhyme (Stanza 1:...

Latest answer posted July 23, 2009 10:15 pm UTC

1 educator answer

A Red, Red Rose

This is one of the most famous short poems by Scottish poet Robert Burns. The feelings experienced upon reading it may differ from one reader to the next. Some readers may find the poem overly...

Latest answer posted May 4, 2016 9:05 pm UTC

1 educator answer

A Red, Red Rose

Stanza 1 is in third person, with the speaker writing about the “luve,” or beloved, using similes to say what she is like. In first address, speaking to the "luve" or “bonnie lass,” continuing this...

Latest answer posted April 16, 2019 5:46 am UTC

2 educator answers

A Red, Red Rose

"A Red, Red Rose" is a ballad written in four quatrains (four stanzas composed of four lines each). The first and third lines of each stanza are written in iambic tetrameter (tetra - four stressed...

Latest answer posted February 26, 2013 6:51 pm UTC

1 educator answer

A Red, Red Rose

Bravo! You've identified the one metaphor in this poem that wasn't immediately clear to me either! I think the simplest explanation is that Burns is referring to an hourglass that's filled with...

Latest answer posted December 20, 2009 10:59 pm UTC

1 educator answer

A Red, Red Rose

Let us remember that a symbol is any object, character or action that stands for both itself, its literal meaning, and also for a larger concept that reaches beyond it. If we look at this very...

Latest answer posted October 28, 2011 7:08 pm UTC

1 educator answer

A Red, Red Rose

Unfortunately the excessive use of hyperbole, passionate sentimental similes and a strong love metaphor in the title did not mean faithfulness to Robert Burns! In this love poem 'A Red Red Rose' he...

Latest answer posted March 2, 2010 8:49 pm UTC

2 educator answers

A Red, Red Rose

The poet continues on to bid his love goodbye, and we see in this last stanza why he has been asserting his love in such strong terms. He is leaving, and he seems to want to convince his lady...

Latest answer posted December 6, 2008 7:21 am UTC

2 educator answers

A Red, Red Rose

I believe that Burns is trying to put in our minds the image of a lover who is declaring his love for his beloved. However, I also think that Burns is intending to create some question in our mind...

Latest answer posted December 29, 2009 10:55 pm UTC

1 educator answer

A Red, Red Rose

While there are several similes in the poem (a simile is a comparison using "like" or "as"), there is only one metaphor which is located at the end of stanza 3. The speaker says: Till a’ the seas...

Latest answer posted November 14, 2019 9:34 pm UTC

1 educator answer

A Red, Red Rose

Generally, a writer uses similes to enable the reader to imagine in his mind what the writer is saying. This is why a writer compares one thing to another with which the reader is familiar. The...

Latest answer posted November 3, 2010 2:11 am UTC

2 educator answers

A Red, Red Rose

"O my Luve is like a red, red rose" is of the most famous poetic similes of all time and has survived into our modern American culture—hundreds of years later. The effect of this simile is...

Latest answer posted December 18, 2019 2:42 am UTC

1 educator answer

A Red, Red Rose

Robert Burns manages quite a bit of technique in this short little poem! To start, he uses the stock simile of a rose to represent love. Roses are special and beautiful, just as true love it. He...

Latest answer posted November 29, 2011 7:02 am UTC

2 educator answers

A Red, Red Rose

Many similes are used in Robert Burns' poem "A Red, Red Rose". The first one, the title, compares love to a rose. It is an obvious comparison to the beauty and delicacy of the flower. The second...

Latest answer posted May 11, 2009 7:49 am UTC

1 educator answer

A Red, Red Rose

Robert Burns poem, "A Red, Red Rose" is written in (b) the ballad stanza. This stanza is a quatrain, in a form that consists of four and three-stress lines. And, usually, only the second and...

Latest answer posted July 30, 2010 5:03 am UTC

1 educator answer

A Red, Red Rose

As far as figures of speech, Burns's poem is chock full of similes, which is when a writer makes comparisons of two unlike things using the words "like" or "as." For example, the speaker of the...

Latest answer posted April 29, 2009 12:03 am UTC

1 educator answer

A Red, Red Rose

Robert Burns published "A Red, Red Rose" in 1794. It is a well-known Scottish ballad, which means it was intended to be sung. The first person narrator of the poem describes is lover in beautiful...

Latest answer posted October 8, 2012 4:56 pm UTC

1 educator answer

A Red, Red Rose

Ah...Robert Graves! He wrote poetry for the oldest and possibly the most respected reason in the book: to woo women. He wrote poetry / songs to play at the pub. He was Irish, so some of the words...

Latest answer posted November 7, 2015 4:17 pm UTC

1 educator answer

A Red, Red Rose

The red rose has long been a symbol of love. On Valentine's Day, it's customary for men to send a dozen red roses to their wives or girlfriends. In Burns's day, too, the red rose was associated...

Latest answer posted October 17, 2018 7:55 am UTC

1 educator answer

A Red, Red Rose

In Robert Burns's "My Luve Is Like A Red, Red Rose," the speaker makes a number of declarations to his beloved. These include: a) that she is as beautiful as a "red, red rose" and as beautiful as...

Latest answer posted May 13, 2010 11:16 am UTC

1 educator answer

A Red, Red Rose

In “A Red, Red Rose,” the overall form lends itself to creating and emphasizing sound patterns. Robert Burns uses quatrains of a type that are usually referred to as ballad stanzas. In this...

Latest answer posted May 11, 2021 6:01 am UTC

1 educator answer

A Red, Red Rose

Simplicity almost always projects a sense of sincerity, and readers tend to love sincerity. The simplicity of Burns's speaker's words (though the Scottish dialect can be difficult for some) helps...

Latest answer posted October 23, 2019 10:14 pm UTC

2 educator answers

A Red, Red Rose

The speaker says this because he's very much in love with his lady, a "bonnie lass." In fact, he's so much in love that he promises to love her even when the seas go dry. Perhaps, through his...

Latest answer posted July 25, 2016 7:29 pm UTC

1 educator answer

A Red, Red Rose

The post by akannan is right; your question asks for something very specific, and we can't fully answer it because we don't know what was covered in the discussion activity. What we can do, of...

Latest answer posted January 13, 2010 11:16 pm UTC

2 educator answers

A Red, Red Rose

I would say no. I do not feel like his use of hyperbole makes the poem seem insincere. I think the main reason for this is that hyperbole is really quite common in poetry and so it just seems...

Latest answer posted February 17, 2010 1:29 pm UTC

1 educator answer

A Red, Red Rose

The poem, a ballad, strives to maintain a regular rhythm and rhyme: abab, cdcd, efef and so on. "Mile" more accurately rhymes with "awhile," while "miles" would...

Latest answer posted December 2, 2007 8:06 am UTC

1 educator answer

A Red, Red Rose

The speaker in the first three stanzas of "A Red, Red Rose" declares his love to his bonnie lass. He compares his love to a blooming rose and to a sweet melody, and he voices his commitment with...

Latest answer posted April 12, 2016 2:41 am UTC

1 educator answer

A Red, Red Rose

Ahhh, a very tricky,but interesting question! The clue is in the genre not the words. Remember what other noble and valuable occupation our favourite Scottish poet was famous for? It was Song...

Latest answer posted January 1, 2010 1:55 am UTC

2 educator answers

A Red, Red Rose

One could conclude that Burns does suggest that delight comes from inside a person rather than from the external world in his poem "A Red, Red Rose". Although Burns describes thelove for his...

Latest answer posted August 30, 2011 4:01 am UTC

1 educator answer

A Red, Red Rose

This line is an example of a simile. A simile is a comparison, usually using "like" or "as." This can be distinguished from a metaphor, in which we are saying something is something, not simply...

Latest answer posted March 23, 2016 3:16 pm UTC

1 educator answer

A Red, Red Rose

Burns' choice of word order as well as the use of a singular rather than plural probably has to do with his desire to stick with the rhyme scheme he employed in these ballad stanzas. Remember that...

Latest answer posted December 1, 2007 4:59 am UTC

1 educator answer

A Red, Red Rose

Robert Burns's poem can also be read as the lyrics to a song. One can readily imagine the speaker singing it to their beloved. The speaker actually changes address within the poem. They begin using...

Latest answer posted March 6, 2019 3:59 am UTC

1 educator answer

A Red, Red Rose

This is an interesting statement to consider in relation to this famous Scottish poem. Which other emotions do you think are not increased when they are expressed? In some ways, I think that...

Latest answer posted September 2, 2011 8:57 pm UTC

1 educator answer