Rebecca Questions and Answers

Rebecca

Soon after Maxim and the narrator meet, he comments on her Christian name, saying that it is 'lovely and unusual'. She says that the name was given by her father, who was an artist, and that he was...

Latest answer posted April 4, 2013 1:34 pm UTC

3 educator answers

Rebecca

Rebecca is symbolic of evil. The face she portrays to the world is very different from her real self. She shows her evil side only to her husband, flaunting her affairs and misdeeds to his face....

Latest answer posted August 24, 2008 10:05 am UTC

2 educator answers

Rebecca

To answer your question, we'll discuss who the characters are in relation to Rebecca. Giles Lacy: Giles is Beatrice's husband. Beatrice, meanwhile, is Maxim de Winter's sister. In the novel, Maxim...

Latest answer posted April 17, 2019 9:07 pm UTC

3 educator answers

Rebecca

In Daphne Du Maurier's Rebecca, the narrator remains nameless in order to convey the overpowering essence of Rebecca, Maxim's dead wife and former mistress of Manderley; and to display without...

Latest answer posted February 28, 2012 1:29 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Rebecca

Near the end of the novel, Max de Winter confesses to his second, unnamed wife that he killed Rebecca. We only hear Max's side of the story, as told to us by a wife who wants very much to believe...

Latest answer posted June 11, 2019 6:23 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Rebecca

Maxim treats the cocker spaniel Jasper as an ordinary family pet, generally showing him some affection but not actually giving him much thought. As the novel wears on, Jasper seems to become more...

Latest answer posted June 9, 2013 12:33 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Rebecca

Since the plot of Rebecca does not hinge on historical, national, or global events in any meaningful way, someone with a clever imagination could very easily adapt it to any time period or physical...

Latest answer posted February 27, 2020 9:56 am UTC

3 educator answers

Rebecca

Throughout most of the novel, the unnamed narrator lives fearfully and timidly in the shadow of the dead Rebecca. Mrs. Danvers constantly describes Rebecca as a beautiful, confident, and vibrant...

Latest answer posted December 20, 2019 2:49 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Rebecca

Tea is part of the well-ordered routine at Manderley. It is served by Frith and a footman in "a stately little performance." It occurs at 4:30 in the afternoon. This is significant, because it is...

Latest answer posted May 26, 2019 4:30 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Rebecca

Flowers are used as symbolism in this novel. The most important instance of this is the rhododendrons. There is a bewildering profusion of them around the drive leading up to Manderley, and the...

Latest answer posted July 1, 2013 7:49 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Rebecca

In these chapters, the heroine (the new Mrs. DeWinter) has trouble establishing herself as the mistress of Manderley but in the process of trying to assert herself, she discovers some things that...

Latest answer posted September 27, 2010 11:57 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Rebecca

In Rebecca, the heroine is the narrator, but she is also nameless. We know her only as Mrs. DeWinter after she marries Maxim DeWinter, although Rebecca was the prior Mrs. Dewinter. By not giving...

Latest answer posted July 27, 2010 11:02 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Rebecca

The first relationship we discover is that between the narrator and Mrs. Van Hooper. This leads to the central relationship between the narrator and Maxim de Winter. This relationship then leads to...

Latest answer posted April 30, 2012 2:35 am UTC

1 educator answer

Rebecca

Daphne Du Maurier's Rebecca deals with numerous themes. One theme is the importance of finding one's identity. The narrator struggles throughout the novel to find her true self, feeling constantly...

Latest answer posted October 22, 2019 2:28 am UTC

1 educator answer

Rebecca

Frank is the agent responsible for managing all affairs of Manderley, and is absolutely committed to Maxim and his new wife. Other characters present him as being boring and dull, but the narrator...

Latest answer posted July 14, 2011 9:41 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Rebecca

One of the ways in which Daphne du Maurier’s Rebecca follows in the tradition of the Gothic novel is that, like other works of the genre, it is an essentially passive reading experience. Although...

Latest answer posted February 27, 2012 7:34 am UTC

1 educator answer

Rebecca

Both of these quotes are references to the story of the crucifixion of Jesus in the New Testament. The first of the two -- about the crowing of the cock refers to a story in which Jesus foretells...

Latest answer posted November 4, 2009 5:34 am UTC

1 educator answer

Rebecca

What an interesting question! Of course, Rebecca in this excellent novel is a rather fascinating character, because she never once appears in the flesh, rather living on in the imagination of the...

Latest answer posted August 10, 2011 8:12 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Rebecca

Frank Crawley is the overseer of Manderley and friend of Maxim de Winter. Unlike the other characters, who the narrator often regards with suspicion or uncertainty, Frank is regularly described or...

Latest answer posted March 10, 2016 9:24 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Rebecca

The three major themes in Rebecca are loyalty, flesh versus spirit, and guilt and innocence.LoyaltyLoyalty is seen most clearly in the characters of Frank Crawley, the business manager of...

Latest answer posted July 19, 2008 6:04 am UTC

1 educator answer

Rebecca

Maxim's first and second wives are opposite personalities. His first wife, Rebecca, now dead, was self-confident, beautiful, self-assured, and much admired for her forceful personality. She was an...

Latest answer posted August 23, 2018 9:03 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Rebecca

Monte Carlo is the natural habitat for someone like Mrs. Van Hopper. Rich, brash, and irredeemably vulgar, this is a place just made for the likes of this unspeakable woman. As Mrs. Van Hopper...

Latest answer posted May 8, 2019 5:23 am UTC

2 educator answers

Rebecca

In Rebecca, Mrs. Danvers is in some regards the voice of the missing Rebecca. Danvers adored and continues to adore Rebecca and feels that the new Mrs. de Winter is a usurper who has no legitimate...

Latest answer posted August 4, 2010 5:10 am UTC

2 educator answers

Rebecca

In Daphne du Maurier's novel, Rebecca, there is an inquest because Rebecca's body is found in her boat which sank to the bottom of the bay. Maxim had erroneously identified the body of another dead...

Latest answer posted December 20, 2011 9:11 am UTC

1 educator answer

Rebecca

An allusion in literature is a reference to sources outside that book, including figures in history or characters in other literary works. An example of an allusion in Rebecca is in Mr. de Winter's...

Latest answer posted February 11, 2019 2:55 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Rebecca

At Manderley, tea is something of an obligation that our narrator doesn't seem to care much for. At Manderley, the narrator prefers to take her tea by the chestnut tree in the garden. The servants...

Latest answer posted July 29, 2020 2:46 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Rebecca

The 1938 publication of Du Maurier's work was poised between two specific historical realities that influence the book. The book's fundamental dilemma between the past and the present/ future is a...

Latest answer posted August 10, 2013 1:06 am UTC

1 educator answer

Rebecca

Manderley is as brooding and sinister in the narrative as its former mistress, Rebecca. The novel opens with the narrator dreaming of the imposing family home which has been part of the De Winter...

Latest answer posted July 27, 2011 2:28 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Rebecca

In Monte Carlo, the narrator has been spending more and more time with Maxim. The two are becoming incredibly close, so much so that Maxim insists on the narrator calling him by his first name...

Latest answer posted July 26, 2018 8:01 am UTC

1 educator answer

Rebecca

You might like to focus on the theme of sexuality in the novel, and how at one stage the narrator begs Maxim, her husband, to accept her and to forget about the past by promising to be "his little...

Latest answer posted May 23, 2011 4:41 am UTC

1 educator answer

Rebecca

In Daphne du Maurier's 1938 gothic novel Rebecca, the unnamed narrator plays the servant to the wealthy American, Mrs. Van Hopper. The two are in Monte Carlo on a vacation, which Mrs. Van Hopper...

Latest answer posted June 28, 2021 10:17 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Rebecca

This novel is full of symbols! I will list the symbols and then explain their representations. 1. Manderley - the grand estate owned by Max and his late wife, Rebecca. It represents the money...

Latest answer posted May 4, 2012 6:11 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Rebecca

Like a Byronic hero, Maxim is aristocratic, handsome, proud, brooding, and burdened with a secret grief. He is a man of deep feeling—though he does not show it—and suffers anguish over both his...

Latest answer posted September 3, 2017 5:24 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Rebecca

The titular character in Daphne du Maurier’s novel Rebecca died months before the story’s beginning. The novel carries her name, however, because Rebecca de Winter’s spirit dominates the narrative....

Latest answer posted April 28, 2019 7:09 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Rebecca

The quiet and meek unnamed narrator of Rebecca is often at a loss for knowing how to behave. Both before and after she marries Maxim de Winter, she does not know what she is supposed do; she feels...

Latest answer posted July 31, 2021 4:03 am UTC

1 educator answer

Rebecca

One of the things I believe the author says about human nature is that we can be our own worst enemies. The heroine and narrator, the "new" Mrs. DeWinter (Rebecca was the old Mrs. DeWinter) starts...

Latest answer posted July 27, 2010 11:15 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Rebecca

I think other editors are right in emphasising the difference between the narrator and her predecessor and rival, Rebecca. The novel, as suggested by the title, is completely dominated by the...

Latest answer posted May 23, 2011 4:37 am UTC

3 educator answers

Rebecca

I would want to argue that one of the strongest themes that emerges from this excellent Gothic classic comes through the character of Maxim de Winter, the "hero" of the piece, who is shown in a...

Latest answer posted May 22, 2011 8:56 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Rebecca

This is an interesting question to think about because, actually, the first chapter of this classic by Daphne du Maurier actually witholds information more than it supplies us with details such as...

Latest answer posted March 12, 2011 7:44 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Rebecca

"The Uncanny" seems to be related to Daphne du Maurier's Rebecca. The definition for "uncanny" is: ...having or seeming to have a supernatural...basis... One of the aspects of "uncanny" is the...

Latest answer posted March 15, 2012 7:30 am UTC

1 educator answer

Rebecca

I think it is important to realise that Manderley, as in every Gothic novel, has a presence and a distinct character of its own, but it is one that is suffused and saturated with the presence of...

Latest answer posted May 23, 2011 4:35 am UTC

1 educator answer

Rebecca

I think the narrator of this excellent tale is alienated at every single turn. She is never allowed to fit in wherever she is, either thanks to Mrs. Van Hopper's snide put-downs and manner or the...

Latest answer posted May 23, 2011 4:40 am UTC

3 educator answers

Rebecca

As a literary term, the word “subtext” has been defined by the Collins English Dictionary as “an underlying theme in a piece of writing” and “a message which is not stated directly but can be...

Latest answer posted March 14, 2012 12:17 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Rebecca

It is vitally important to remember that this story is actually told using the first person point of view, where the entire action is narrated to us through one of the characters in the story....

Latest answer posted May 20, 2011 8:01 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Rebecca

The narrator is unaware of the dramatic events surrounding the marriage of Maxim and Rebecca de Winter, and Mrs de Winter’s subsequent death. She only gleans snippets of information from her...

Latest answer posted January 21, 2010 6:04 am UTC

2 educator answers

Rebecca

Maxim is very much a hero in the Byronic mold. That is to say that he stands apart from human society, cold and unapproachable, dashingly handsome, but with something dark and brooding about him....

Latest answer posted December 3, 2017 9:51 am UTC

2 educator answers

Rebecca

The unnamed narrator of du Maurier's novel Rebecca remembers tea time as an especially lavish occasion at Manderley. At her new husband's estate, the narrator recalls there being an abundance of...

Latest answer posted June 28, 2021 10:45 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Rebecca

It can be argued that Maxim's actions are certainly consistent with his character. As the other educator has already pointed out, Maxim is primarily focused on protecting his family name and...

Latest answer posted August 8, 2018 6:36 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Rebecca

Rebecca is almost the quintessential romance written by a woman and intended for a female audience (although I read it myself and have seen the Hitchcock film version several times). Since the...

Latest answer posted March 7, 2012 3:28 am UTC

2 educator answers

Rebecca

The answer really depends on the reader's interpretation of Rebecca. Virtually everything that the reader knows about Rebecca (until the end of the novel) is based upon others' comments about and...

Latest answer posted August 7, 2010 11:16 pm UTC

1 educator answer

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