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  • The Raven
    In Edgar Allan Poe's "The Raven," the title creature represents a number of things. A close, New Critical reading focusing on the text of the poem alone can suggest that the raven represents a...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Raven
    Poe seems to choose a raven, a "non-reasoning" creature, because it allows for ambiguity in the speaker's interpretation of the raven's speech. At first, the speaker assumes that the raven is only...

    Asked by mcburke03 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Raven
    This poem takes as its subject the experiences of a man on a "bleak" December night shortly after the death of his lover, Lenore. On this night, he is attempting to distract himself from his...

    Asked by princeshanty on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Raven
    The first time the narrator hears the rapping at the door, he answers it to find that there is no one there. He whispers his dead lover's name, Lenore, hears it echo back to him, and then he turns...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Raven
    In stanzas fifteen and sixteen, the speaker essentially asks the raven two questions. In stanza fifteen, the speaker asks, "Is there—is there balm in Gilead?" By this he means to ask if there...

    Asked by btardizzone on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Raven
    The raven is a highly intelligent, big, all-black bird largely found in the Northern Hemisphere. It feeds on both plants and animals and thus is highly adaptable to different living circumstances....

    Asked by enotes on via web

    2 educator answers

  • The Raven
    "...Night's Plutonian shore!" The main literary techniques here are allusion and metaphor. Pluto is the god of the dead in Roman mythology. The allusion to Pluto evokes both a sense of deep night...

    Asked by mikaylafuller on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Raven
    “The Raven” by Edgar Allen Poe was published in January of 1845 during the era of Romanticism, which occurred from the late 1700s into the mid-1800s. Romanticism does not focus solely on love;...

    Asked by jayellejohnston on via web

    2 educator answers

  • Romeo and Juliet
    There are common themes of deep, obsessive love and unimaginable loss in the poem “The Raven” and the play Romeo and Juliet. They are both dark, brooding pieces. The speaker in "the Raven" is a...

    Asked by blackbirdmotionpictures on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Raven
    In Edgar Allen Poe's "The Raven," a melancholy student is visited by a raven who utters the famous, cryptic phrase, "Nevermore." Though the student reasons that the bird probably learned the phrase...

    Asked by beverleeaguilar1 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Raven
    One of the most memorable things about Poe's "The Raven" is the repetition of the word "nevermore" at the end of nearly every stanza. The bird probably only knows that one word, but it becomes a...

    Asked by user8236626 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Raven
    "The Raven" is about a man who is grieving over the death of his lost lover, Lenore, and how he plunges deeper and deeper into depression. Poe uses suspense to help readers empathize with the man's...

    Asked by kaitlyncutie6 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Raven
    "The Raven" presents the psychological truth that human beings are always trying to mitigate or palliate our fear that death really is the end. The narrator begins the poem by describing his...

    Asked by celesterr98 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Raven
    One way to interpret characters in poetry is to analyze them both with a literal eye as well as a figurative one. In Poe's "The Raven," a man sits grieving in his chamber over his lost love,...

    Asked by leenaahmed1605 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Raven
    For the first half of the poem, the raven seems to be a literal bird that comes into the narrator's chamber when he flings open his window. The man is able to take some pleasure from the unusual...

    Asked by user114169 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Raven
    One example of alliteration, the repetition of an initial consonant sound, occurs when the narrator says, "Deep into the darkness peering, long I stood there wondering, fearing, / Doubting,...

    Asked by christinakoufalas972 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Raven
    The events of the poem take place late in the year, in "bleak December" (line 7), and at "midnight" (1). Both midnight and December are often symbolic of death, especially in works by Edgar Allan...

    Asked by codysellers23 on via web

    2 educator answers

  • The Raven
    The narrator of the poem hears a knocking at his door, but it is December, and right around midnight, so it seems unlikely that this knocking would be coming from some natural source. He has been...

    Asked by user9166463 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Raven
    The student’s question—what is a description of the power of landscapes in Edgar Allan Poe’s poem The Raven—can, perhaps, best be answered with reference to a broader examination of this...

    Asked by nataliepimentep26 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Raven
    When the bird first steps through the window into his room, the narrator calls it "a stately raven of the saintly days of yore" (line 38), and he specifically talks about the way it conducts itself...

    Asked by andrewpeter07 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Raven
    In "The Raven," Edgar Allan Poe employs a Gothic ambiance to explore themes of grief, negativity, and depression. As the poem opens, the narrator is at home alone at night feeling sad and lonely....

    Asked by leonquintana24 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Raven
    "The dirges of his hope" in this poem means "the sad songs sung to express that hope itself has died" or, more simply, "the sad sounds made by a hopeless man." Let's explore that idea. Dirges are...

    Asked by user522518 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Raven
    The speaker in "The Raven" asks the bird if there's anything that will ease his heartache, and if there's any chance he'll see his lost love in the afterlife. Let's check out the details of these...

    Asked by user5603989 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Raven
    One way that we learn about our narrator is through his use of allusions. Allusions are references to other texts, places, people, or events that bring richness and nuance to a text. In this...

    Asked by user9082164 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Raven
    We don't actually know for sure why the bird has come. It could simply be that he is just a bird who can see lights on and so taps at the window to be let in; if he is a tame bird who belongs to...

    Asked by wahraysay19 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Raven
    In the fourth stanza, the narrator undergoes a bit of a change in courage. In the third stanza, he says, he is filled with "fantastic terrors," likely referring to his fears about who could be...

    Asked by josevides32 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Raven
    Aidenn is the Arabic word for Paradise; one might consider its similarity to the word Eden (like the Garden of Eden in the book of Genesis in the Old Testament of the Bible), a word that also...

    Asked by user5735460 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Raven
    One could argue that English language poetry has changed drastically in the years since 1845 when Edgar Allan Poe wrote "The Raven," and that therefore this classic piece of American poetry should...

    Asked by user9077518 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Raven
    Gothic fiction is typically characterized by mystery as well as elements of the supernatural, and "The Raven" in many ways contains both. First, the fact that the poem begins on a "midnight...

    Asked by medopay on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Raven
    In this line, the speaker "wheeled a cushioned seat in front of bird, and bust, and door" in order to consider the bird. The bird conducts himself like a lord or lady and speaks the word...

    Asked by user4791026 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Raven
    The raven in this poem is very mysterious for a number of reasons. First, the fact that he appears to rap at the narrator's door at midnight is both odd and unsettling, especially considering that...

    Asked by user8916115 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Raven
    Edgar Allan Poe's poem, "The Raven", is focused on an inner conflict, the struggle of the narrator against his own sorrow and depression at the death of Lenore. The poem opens by describing the...

    Asked by katieiceleaf on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Raven
    My impression of the narrator is that he is a man who has recently lost his beloved, a woman he calls "Lenore," and in enduring her death, he is coming face to face with both it as well as his own...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Raven
    When the poem begins, the narrator is awake and poring "Over many a quaint and curious volume of forgotten lore" (line 2). It is midnight and he is, as he tells us, attempting to distract himself...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Raven
    First, who is "rapping" at the narrator's door (21)? Is it Lenore's ghost? If so, why has she returned? If not, who then? If it were the raven, then he, presumably, would have entered when the...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Raven
    When the raven flies into the narrator's study, he alights on a bust of the Greek goddess, Athena. The poem's narrator says that the raven entered "with mien of lord or lady, perched above my...

    Asked by brewington10 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Raven
    Some descriptive words about the bird in "The Raven" include grim, stern, ebony [black], ancient and ghastly. The bird is also described more than once as still and unmoving, standing without a...

    Asked by user3897706 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Raven
    Let’s set the scene of the famous Poe poem, “The Raven.” The narrator is in his dark living room alone by a fire that is going out reading old and forgotten books. The flames of the fire...

    Asked by sakkaziad17 on via iOS

    1 educator answer

  • The Raven
    The physical setting of this poem is the narrator's den. He describes this room only as a "chamber," but because it houses books and a bust of Athena, it seems to be a study of some kind (line...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Raven
    Edgar Allan Poe uses both internal and external rhyming patterns in “The Raven.” In general, internal rhyme occurs when the middle word of a line rhymes with the ending word of the same line....

    Asked by rlsasser on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Raven
    Alliteration refers exclusively to the repetition of the initial consonant sound of words. The initial lines of this stanza read, "And the silken sad uncertain rustling of each purple curtain /...

    Asked by user7142576 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Raven
    Alliteration is the repetition of initial consonant sounds in words that are close to each other in the text. Here the words "nodded, nearly napping" all begin with the /n/ sound, and the three...

    Asked by user9642161 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Raven
    In the poem "The Raven" by Edgar Allan Poe, the narrator gets an unexpected visit from a raven. Surprisingly, the raven can speak, but the only word it seems capable of uttering is "Nevermore." The...

    Asked by anayelimartinez95 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Raven
    First in answer to this question, I would say that the Raven does not really need to be explained. The poem is an example of The Gothic, a genre that features fantastical elements much more...

    Asked by tommyk2317 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Raven
    In Edgar Allan Poe’s poem “The Raven” he describes the embers as “dying” for a number of reasons. He uses the lines: Ah, distinctly I remember it was in the bleak December; And each...

    Asked by tupulologo18 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Raven
    Many words could be used to describe the mood in Edgar Allan Poe's brilliant poem "The Raven." In a single word, it can be considered "Gothic," which you can read more about in the link below. More...

    Asked by lizzybel on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Raven
    The conflict that exists within the speaker who has lost his love, Lenore, is resolved when he finally despairs of ever being reunited with her. The forlorn lover utters these lines at the poem's...

    Asked by user6274622 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Raven
    That is an interesting question. I've never imagined questioning whether or not the bird was actually a real bird. I have always thought it was a real bird that actually flew into the speaker's...

    Asked by williamsb03052015 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Raven
    In this poem, there is a great deal of sound repetition, and this repetition has a number of interesting effects on the reader. For example, there is the poem's perhaps most immediately...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Raven
    In "The Raven," Edgar Allan Poe reveals one of the greatest traits of human nature is the capacity to love, just as the speaker clearly deeply loved the late Lenore. Poe also shows that with love...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

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