The Rape of the Lock Questions and Answers

The Rape of the Lock

Pope wrote this mock-epic poem at the request of his friend John Caryll to help heal a rift between two prominent Catholic families. In real life, Lord Petre had taken a lock of Arabella Fermor's...

Latest answer posted March 28, 2018 9:11 pm UTC

2 educator answers

The Rape of the Lock

In his mock epic The Rape of the Lock, Alexander Pope focuses on several major themes. The primary theme is the emptiness and frivolity of courtly, upper-class life, which Pope satirizes...

Latest answer posted January 5, 2021 5:07 pm UTC

3 educator answers

The Rape of the Lock

Belinda is presented by Pope in "The Rape of the Lock" as a bundle of contradictions. This makes her not just a more interesting character, but also a reflection of the society in which she lives....

Latest answer posted January 15, 2018 12:26 pm UTC

2 educator answers

The Rape of the Lock

Belinda's toilet scene occurs at the end of canto 1, running from lines 121 to 148 and starting with And now, unveiled, the Toilet stands displayed, Each Silver vase in mystic Order laid and...

Latest answer posted January 19, 2021 2:09 pm UTC

4 educator answers

The Rape of the Lock

The game of Ombre is played in Canto III of The Rape of the Lock. This card game, which is similar to bridge, was played with three players in the 17th century, although it began in the 16th...

Latest answer posted April 29, 2017 12:11 am UTC

2 educator answers

The Rape of the Lock

The Rape of the Lock is a "mock epic" or as Pope calls it in the subtitle, an "Heroi-Comical Poem in Five Cantos." This poem was meant to poke fun at the aristocracy. This poem is a classic form of...

Latest answer posted October 24, 2013 6:26 pm UTC

1 educator answer

The Rape of the Lock

Canto 1 opens with the lines, What dire offence from am'rous causes springs, What mighty contests rise from trivial things. These lines, especially the words "trivial things" signal that this...

Latest answer posted January 28, 2021 12:21 pm UTC

4 educator answers

The Rape of the Lock

In his address of the poem to the heroine, Miss Arabella Fermor, Pope tells why there is supernatural machinery in the poem: The Machinery, Madam, is a Term invented by the Criticks, to signify...

Latest answer posted January 27, 2012 1:45 am UTC

1 educator answer

The Rape of the Lock

Let me start with listing a few themes in the poem. Sex and sexuality, femininity, narcissism, and vanity. Those are not the only themes present in Pope's poem, but when a reader thinks about...

Latest answer posted August 18, 2015 2:32 pm UTC

1 educator answer

The Rape of the Lock

This couplet is part of a series of observations Pope makes about what was usually referred to as "the inconstancy of women." The behavior of women, in Pope's mock-heroic scenario, is controlled by...

Latest answer posted March 19, 2019 3:04 am UTC

2 educator answers

The Rape of the Lock

The Rape of the Lock is a mock epic, meaning that it is written in the form of an epic poem but uses satire to make fun of the society in which Pope lived. Pope saw this society as one which had...

Latest answer posted March 15, 2010 6:04 am UTC

2 educator answers

The Rape of the Lock

In one sense, the answer to this question is fairly straightforward: Pope's The Rape of the Lock (1714), which he subtitled "An Heroi-Comical Poem in Five Canto's"—that is, a mock epic—was written...

Latest answer posted November 25, 2019 12:25 am UTC

4 educator answers

The Rape of the Lock

"The Rape of the Lock" is a mock epic or an "heroi-comical poem" as Pope describes it in the epigraph. The poem uses the form, tone, and seriousness often reserved for genuine epics which are...

Latest answer posted September 22, 2015 4:08 pm UTC

1 educator answer

The Rape of the Lock

Pope’s poem is a mock-epic: that is, a poem that treats insignificant events in the manner of epic poetry. The opening couplet, which you quote, sets the stage for the entire poem, suggesting that...

Latest answer posted July 5, 2018 11:40 am UTC

2 educator answers

The Rape of the Lock

In canto 3 of The Rape of the Lock, the speaker refers to Queen Anne's activities at Hampton Court. The speaker addresses her directly (the literary device known as apostrophe) as "great Anna." The...

Latest answer posted July 18, 2019 2:52 am UTC

1 educator answer

The Rape of the Lock

The Rape of the Lock is a narrative poem written by the eighteenth-century English poet Alexander Pope about a Baron who steals the main character Belinda's flowing locks. Belinda is guarded by 50...

Latest answer posted November 24, 2018 12:09 pm UTC

2 educator answers

The Rape of the Lock

This quote is part of the opening stanza of "The Rape of the Lock," which reads as follows: What dire offence from am'rous causes springs, What mighty contests rise from trivial things, I...

Latest answer posted January 7, 2021 2:34 pm UTC

3 educator answers

The Rape of the Lock

The four types of spirits which dead women take on in Alexander Pope's The Rape of Lock are mirrored by the four elements: air, earth, water, and fire. In lines 59–60, we are introduced to...

Latest answer posted July 21, 2018 9:27 pm UTC

2 educator answers

The Rape of the Lock

The background to "The Rape of the Lock" is a trifling dispute between two families of English Catholic aristocrats over the unauthorized cutting—the "rape" of the title—of a lock of hair. The lock...

Latest answer posted December 24, 2018 11:44 am UTC

2 educator answers

The Rape of the Lock

One of the brilliant aspects of this mock epic is the way in which Pope exposes the focus of his society on various superficial aspects such as outward appearance. This is of course shown through...

Latest answer posted January 3, 2012 4:36 pm UTC

1 educator answer

The Rape of the Lock

A Muse refers to one of seven sisters in Greek mythology, each of whom were responsible for a particular branch of art or science. It was typical for epics such as Homer's Odyssey and Milton's...

Latest answer posted January 9, 2013 7:54 pm UTC

1 educator answer

The Rape of the Lock

Pope describes The Rape of the Lock as a "heroi-comical" poem—heroic because he uses the Homeric epic to frame the poem and comical because he is attempting to defuse a serious argument between two...

Latest answer posted November 27, 2018 8:00 pm UTC

2 educator answers

The Rape of the Lock

Keep in mind that "The Rape of the Lock" is a mock epic. Pope is satirizing--skewering, really--the silliness of high society of his day by placing an incident within the form of an epic, complete...

Latest answer posted March 23, 2016 2:07 pm UTC

1 educator answer

The Rape of the Lock

As in the Iliad, the supernatural has a part to play in this mock-epic poem. In the Iliad,it is gods and goddesses who interact with and help their favorites, such as Achilles. In The Rape of the...

Latest answer posted July 8, 2018 6:48 pm UTC

2 educator answers

The Rape of the Lock

The Rape of the Lock is a wonderful poem, but different readers are going to gravitate to certain sections more than others. Additionally, different readers are going to have different themes and...

Latest answer posted March 16, 2019 3:16 pm UTC

3 educator answers

The Rape of the Lock

The style used in "The Rape of the Lock" is mock epic or, as Pope calls it in a subtitle, "An Heroi-Comical Poem." Pope treats these relatively trivial events as if they were wars and journeys...

Latest answer posted September 28, 2012 9:29 pm UTC

1 educator answer

The Rape of the Lock

Canto 1 begins with a traditional invoking of the muses as well as setting up the subject matter of the poem, "The Rape of the Lock." This does not concern a sexual rape but rather, in the parlance...

Latest answer posted September 7, 2019 11:32 pm UTC

3 educator answers

The Rape of the Lock

The quote in question is only understandable in reference to the stanza that precedes it. The Baron had been contemplating schemes for attaining a lock of Belinda's perfectly curled and styled...

Latest answer posted August 11, 2011 2:03 pm UTC

1 educator answer

The Rape of the Lock

In Alexander Pope's eighteenth-century mock-epic, The Rape of the Lock, the main character, Belinda, arrives by boat at an extravagant party held at Hampton Court Palace. Pope writes at the...

Latest answer posted May 24, 2016 4:57 am UTC

1 educator answer

The Rape of the Lock

These lines use hyperbole (exaggeration) to mockingly foreshadow the "crisis" that will soon erupt: Belinda's loss of a lock of hair to the Baron. Horrors! The poem pokes fun at a real-life furor...

Latest answer posted May 15, 2017 12:03 pm UTC

2 educator answers

The Rape of the Lock

Pope's "The Rape of the Lock" is a mock-epic, which means it is written to be funny. Humor works by using overstatement, surprise, and exaggeration: We as readers are so startled by the...

Latest answer posted July 4, 2019 7:49 pm UTC

2 educator answers

The Rape of the Lock

These lines occur in Cant III of Pope's The Rape of the Lock. In these lines, Pope is speaking satirically with significant irony and something of mocking ridicule. The setting Pope is describing...

Latest answer posted August 9, 2011 11:51 am UTC

2 educator answers

The Rape of the Lock

Belinda represents not so much eighteenth-century women as she does an ideal of glamor and womanhood that was typical of the upper-class mentality of the time. In this sense, she's not much...

Latest answer posted July 1, 2018 3:23 am UTC

1 educator answer

The Rape of the Lock

First of all, let us define the so-called supernatural machinery. Here is a helpful quote from a letter Alexander Pope added to the second edition of the poem: The Machinery, Madam, is a term...

Latest answer posted June 6, 2018 5:08 pm UTC

2 educator answers

The Rape of the Lock

Wow, there are a lot of really great questions being asked here. This particular Pope piece is a wonderfully comedic bit of poetry, and once students begin to understand what is being presented to...

Latest answer posted July 28, 2018 3:30 pm UTC

1 educator answer

The Rape of the Lock

Pope's "The Rape of the Lock," generally considered to be the finest mock-heroic poem in English literature, was written as a favor to Pope's friend, John Caryll, to help smooth over a dispute...

Latest answer posted January 16, 2012 9:37 pm UTC

1 educator answer

The Rape of the Lock

These lines appear in canto 2. The speech in which the lines are contained is Ariel’s instructions to his army of sylphs on what each of them will do to guide and protect Belinda. For instance, he...

Latest answer posted July 26, 2018 9:27 pm UTC

2 educator answers

The Rape of the Lock

Traditionally, writers of epic poems would invoke the Muses, ancient goddesses who protected the arts. Pope, however, invokes the name of his friend John Caryll, ('Caryl' in the poem) who...

Latest answer posted March 12, 2018 1:35 pm UTC

1 educator answer

The Rape of the Lock

Pope's poem "The Rape of the Lock" is separated into five different parts (Cantos). The lines below are from Canto Two of the poem, lines 16-18: Might hide her Faults, if Belles had faults to...

Latest answer posted August 5, 2011 5:04 am UTC

1 educator answer

The Rape of the Lock

These lines, from the beginning of Canto Five, represent the voice of reason, Clarissa, in the midst of the chaos. Through the literal interpretation of the lines, she closes her speech by...

Latest answer posted August 14, 2011 4:31 am UTC

1 educator answer

The Rape of the Lock

This quote actually comes towards the beginning of this excellent mock epic, and is part of the description of Pope's speculation of what might happen to the poor Belinda on a particularly...

Latest answer posted August 10, 2011 7:32 pm UTC

1 educator answer

The Rape of the Lock

The short answer is that "The Rape of the Lock" is both mock epic and mock-heroic epic. Mock epic and Mock-heroic epic are often considered the same thing. Pope's subtitle is "An Heroi-Comical...

Latest answer posted July 31, 2012 4:20 pm UTC

1 educator answer

The Rape of the Lock

The following line appears in Canto One of Pope's poem "The Rape of the Lock": This to disclose is all thy Guardian can. The line is 113 and lies as the second to last line in stanza 10. Canto...

Latest answer posted August 5, 2011 9:26 pm UTC

1 educator answer

The Rape of the Lock

Pope's "The Rape of the Lock" is a mock-epic, meaning that it is written in the style of an ancient epic poem but that the events it contains are utterly trivial. The entire poem is based around...

Latest answer posted April 9, 2021 8:16 am UTC

1 educator answer

The Rape of the Lock

Pope's "The Rape of the Lock" (1712; 1714) is based on an actual incident in which Lord Petre took some scissors and snipped a bit of hair from Miss Arabella Fermor, an action which caused a...

Latest answer posted December 22, 2011 10:24 pm UTC

1 educator answer

The Rape of the Lock

Alexander Pope, the author of this hilarious mock-epic, was renowned for his use of heroic couplets in his work. These are called heroic couplets because both Pope and his literary predecessor John...

Latest answer posted December 16, 2010 6:37 pm UTC

1 educator answer

The Rape of the Lock

"The Rape of the Lock" is considered to be perhaps the best mock-heroic poem in English literature because of Pope's incredible ability to incorporate themes, language and characters from Classical...

Latest answer posted January 18, 2012 3:05 am UTC

1 educator answer

The Rape of the Lock

The similiarity between these two sections of the poem lies in the way that Pope creates a world where the normal world interacts with a kind of fairy world, with a number of attendant fairies that...

Latest answer posted January 25, 2012 1:49 pm UTC

1 educator answer

The Rape of the Lock

The questions are posed in Canto I, lines 7–10. First: Say what strange motive, Goddess, could compel A well-bred lord to assault a gentle belle? The second question: O say what stranger cause,...

Latest answer posted March 3, 2019 10:04 pm UTC

2 educator answers

The Rape of the Lock

In The Rape of the Lock, Pope satirizes human vanity and specifically the fashionable upper-class English society of his own time. At the start of canto II he describes his heroine, Belinda, in...

Latest answer posted May 23, 2018 7:50 pm UTC

1 educator answer

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