The Prelude Questions and Answers

The Prelude

The Prelude is a long autobiographical poem that Wordsworth worked on for much of his adult life in which he describes his early years and his development as a poet sage. It is considered by many...

Latest answer posted August 4, 2019, 7:16 pm (UTC)

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The Prelude

The subtitle of "The Prelude" is "Growth of a Poet's Mind." In this autobiographical poem, Wordsworth details how his outlook has changed over the course of decades, from his carefree boyhood and...

Latest answer posted June 2, 2018, 7:51 am (UTC)

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The Prelude

The Prelude was intended to be a preface to another epic poem called The Recluse. However, Wordsworth became more involved with The Prelude and therefore never finished his proposed epic The...

Latest answer posted June 20, 2016, 3:55 pm (UTC)

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The Prelude

Nature is a source of beauty, peace, and inspiration to William Wordsworth in "The Prelude." Nature is, first and foremost, beautiful. Wordsworth uses a great deal of nature imagery when describing...

Latest answer posted November 22, 2019, 7:04 pm (UTC)

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The Prelude

The growth of the poet's mind is not just a part of The Prelude but the driving force behind this long poem, the reason for its being. Wordsworth wanted to explain to the world how he became a poet...

Latest answer posted June 5, 2017, 12:27 pm (UTC)

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The Prelude

In the first book of The Prelude, the long autobiographical poem in which Wordsworth describes for his friend Coleridge how he became a poet-sage, Wordsworth focuses on his childhood. He often...

Latest answer posted November 18, 2020, 12:41 pm (UTC)

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The Prelude

Firstly, The Prelude is strongly concerned with the link between humanity and the natural world. Wordsworth describes his childhood experiences with nature and his almost religious union with the...

Latest answer posted June 8, 2019, 2:10 pm (UTC)

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The Prelude

As mentioned in the answer above, The Prelude is a long autobiographical poem by William Wordsworth. It is called The Prelude because it was intended as a prelude to a longer poem. Although the...

Latest answer posted May 29, 2015, 2:49 pm (UTC)

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The Prelude

Wordsworth himself viewed this work, which was unpublished on his death, as an autobiographical poem in which he sought to describe his growth and development of his understanding of man's...

Latest answer posted July 8, 2013, 6:59 am (UTC)

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The Prelude

In "The Prelude," Wordsworth's concept of "growing up" is about maturation. Wordsworth worked at the poem for most of his life. The poem centers on the idea if his maturation as a human being has...

Latest answer posted June 11, 2013, 9:39 am (UTC)

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The Prelude

The youthful Wordsworth and Coleridge were alike in being radical critics of the social order. Both wanted to write a new form of poetry which was not based on classical literature, rationality,...

Latest answer posted December 9, 2017, 2:07 pm (UTC)

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The Prelude

This famous and lengthy poem by Wordsworth is very definitely a psychological poem in that it focuses on the thoughts and feelings of the speaker and how they develop as he ages. It is very much a...

Latest answer posted January 29, 2013, 7:19 am (UTC)

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The Prelude

This poem charts the gradual development of Wordsworth's relationship with nature as he grows up, starting with his very first childhood recollections of nature and realisations of its power and...

Latest answer posted January 29, 2013, 7:04 am (UTC)

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The Prelude

Parallelism is a literary technique where parts of a sentence are grammatically or structurally the same. It could also include similarities in sound and rhythm. Using parallelism is using...

Latest answer posted January 16, 2016, 2:29 am (UTC)

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The Prelude

The first section of this lengthy poem, argued by some critics to be the best presentation of Wordsworth's beliefs about nature, concerns a description of the speaker's childhood and his early...

Latest answer posted March 11, 2013, 7:34 am (UTC)

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The Prelude

The Prelude is a long autobiographical poem, and Wordsworth's relation to the French Revolution could be understood as an important and even epic narrative arc (the poem itself is not an epic,...

Latest answer posted November 18, 2020, 10:20 pm (UTC)

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The Prelude

Wordsworth was the longest-lived of the major Romantic poets. The brief, tragic lives of Keats, Shelley and Byron are often remarked upon, and their early deaths add to their mystique. Wordsworth,...

Latest answer posted May 23, 2020, 11:40 pm (UTC)

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The Prelude

In one sense, this statement is certainly true, as the poem is given the subtitle of "An Autobiographical Poem." As such, nature, which is of course the main topic of the poem as it is in all of...

Latest answer posted February 2, 2013, 7:09 am (UTC)

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The Prelude

Both Wordsworth, in book VII of his long autobiographical poem The Prelude, and Dickens, in his essay about walking the streets at night, are focused on London in all its vast diversity. They both...

Latest answer posted January 8, 2020, 4:39 pm (UTC)

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The Prelude

Wordsworth, ever passionate about nature and a person's own expression and vision of life intended for The Prelude to be the introduction to a largely reflective poem, philosophical in nature and...

Latest answer posted October 18, 2012, 11:45 am (UTC)

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The Prelude

In The Prelude, William Wordsworth's argument concerning his sense of knowledge of both self and the world is intimately tied to his conceptions of nature and childhood. He sees many of the...

Latest answer posted February 16, 2012, 3:38 pm (UTC)

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The Prelude

The Prelude by William Wordsworth is an autobiographical poem that attempts to trace Wordsworth's own evolution as a poet. It emphasizes particularly memorable moments in his development....

Latest answer posted July 5, 2016, 12:07 pm (UTC)

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The Prelude

The Prelude is a book-length autobiographical poem in which Wordsworth explores his development as a poet-sage. In book seven, Wordsworth focuses on the time he spent in London as a young man....

Latest answer posted November 16, 2019, 2:01 pm (UTC)

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The Prelude

The depiction of the Romantic autobiographer that Wordsworth renders is one that almost stands outside of himself. Wordsworth is able to reveal himself as an autobiographer who is so certain in...

Latest answer posted January 24, 2012, 7:07 pm (UTC)

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The Prelude

The most obvious difference between William Wordsworth’s “The Prelude” and and Thomas De Quincey’s Confessions of an English Opium-Eater is that the former is in verse and the latter in prose....

Latest answer posted January 24, 2012, 6:58 am (UTC)

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