The Poisonwood Bible Questions and Answers

The Poisonwood Bible

The Poisonwood Bible has numerous symbolic elements. To describe them all would take many pages. I will list and describe some of the more noteworthy ones below. The Poisonwood Tree This noxious...

Latest answer posted April 27, 2020 4:47 pm UTC

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The Poisonwood Bible

Irony is a literary device that can be verbal or situational. Verbal irony occurs when words contradict meaning. Situational irony occurs when a situation ends up differently than anticipated....

Latest answer posted October 28, 2019 2:43 pm UTC

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The Poisonwood Bible

Barbara Kingsolver, during an interview with News24 (a South African media outlet), stated that she was working on film adaptations of the Poisonwood Bible and Prodigal Summer as well as writing...

Latest answer posted July 13, 2015 7:42 pm UTC

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The Poisonwood Bible

The novel is told from five points of view—Orleanna Price, the mother, and her four daughters: Ruth May, Leah, Adah, and Rachel. The chapter headings are marked accordingly, but the uniqueness and...

Latest answer posted November 5, 2017 11:00 am UTC

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The Poisonwood Bible

Kingsolver uses first-person narratives to provide different accounts of the events in the novel. Each narrator brings his or her own perspective to the telling of the story, creating the need for...

Latest answer posted September 11, 2016 7:45 pm UTC

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The Poisonwood Bible

The novel opens with the meditation of a white woman, Orleanna Price, addressed to her favorite child, on Africa. Kingsolver uses this as her opening because it introduces setting, character, and...

Latest answer posted May 7, 2017 12:55 pm UTC

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The Poisonwood Bible

Leah's a tricky one, and can be more identified by what she doesn't do than what she does do. Her lack of unique language use actually sets her apart from her sisters. For example, Adah...

Latest answer posted October 27, 2010 9:54 am UTC

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The Poisonwood Bible

The village disappearing from the land can be attributed to simple cultural and social changes that sculpt every landscape of an evolving country. Villages come and go, just as cities-and even...

Latest answer posted March 15, 2009 12:46 pm UTC

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The Poisonwood Bible

"The verse" is at the end of the one hundred verses Mr. Price forces the girls to write out from the book of Numbers as a punishment when they cause trouble. The hundred verses end on Numbers...

Latest answer posted September 6, 2020 11:24 am UTC

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The Poisonwood Bible

In Barbara Kingsolver’s The Poisonwood Bible, two major double themes are presented: captivity and freedom, and love and betrayal. The narrative centers around the Price family, missionaries from...

Latest answer posted December 30, 2019 9:01 pm UTC

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The Poisonwood Bible

It is not Nathan's story. He is overconfident, pushy, and self-absorbed. He expects to be listened to, but rarely speaks WITH anyone...only AT them. The story, therefore, is told from the points...

Latest answer posted January 30, 2008 11:12 am UTC

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The Poisonwood Bible

Writing a novel from the viewpoint of multiple characters is a challenging undertaking, but Barbara Kingsolver transitions seamlessly between the five women of the Price family. Each of the four...

Latest answer posted February 14, 2018 1:45 am UTC

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The Poisonwood Bible

Leah’s concept of justice is practical and political. Her ideals at Bikoki Station are mostly centred around the Congolese people being free of US interference. When she was a child, Leah fought...

Latest answer posted October 21, 2020 1:04 pm UTC

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The Poisonwood Bible

Adah explains that Nelson has taught her the Kikongo word nommo, meaning "word." It is the force that "makes things live as what they are" (page 209). Adah explains that this concept helps her...

Latest answer posted August 14, 2016 1:54 pm UTC

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The Poisonwood Bible

It's impossible to give the full meaning of this great book in this small space, so please go to the link below and get the full details. This novel is the story of the Price family and the time...

Latest answer posted September 23, 2007 10:19 am UTC

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The Poisonwood Bible

In The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver, the new world of the Congo deeply affects each character. Orleanna Price—Orleanna is forced to move to the Congo by her husband, Nathan Price. As life...

Latest answer posted December 4, 2018 8:42 pm UTC

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The Poisonwood Bible

Good question. The Kikongo word "nommo" means "name", but also it is the force that makes things live - a kind of soul or life force perhaps? A significant quote about "nommo" is: Nommo comes from...

Latest answer posted March 16, 2009 10:30 pm UTC

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The Poisonwood Bible

Two of the many kinds of captivity Kingsolver explores in The Poisonwood Bible, a novel of impressive sweep, are the captivity of one's preconceived ideas and the captivity of poverty. Nathan Price...

Latest answer posted May 14, 2019 2:52 pm UTC

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The Poisonwood Bible

Through the events and descriptions of the Price family, we learn a great deal. The underlying theme is the effect of colonialism on the African people, and the Price women tell us about this theme...

Latest answer posted July 1, 2007 11:38 am UTC

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The Poisonwood Bible

In The Poisonwood Bible, Rachel represents imperialism and ethnocentrism. She never assimilates or learns to love Africa in a way that feels comfortable for her. She only takes. Ruth May represents...

Latest answer posted January 20, 2019 1:38 am UTC

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The Poisonwood Bible

Book 3 of The Poisonwood Bible is titled "The Judges." Kingsolver does not explicitly name who the judges are, but the reader can make that determination by way of context. It is likely that the...

Latest answer posted April 15, 2020 6:19 pm UTC

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The Poisonwood Bible

In The Poisonwood Bible, author Barbara Kingsolver especially develops the theme of cruelty through the character Nathan Price, a missionary who came to the Congo with his family from the state of...

Latest answer posted August 3, 2015 12:19 am UTC

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The Poisonwood Bible

If Nathan Price represents Christianity as an instrument of colonialist oppression, Brother Fowles represents its true essence as a religion of love and peace. Though Fowles lives and works among...

Latest answer posted May 27, 2020 9:06 am UTC

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The Poisonwood Bible

If anyone is guilty of colonization, it is Nathan Price, not Orleanna. Nathan went with intents to change and conquer, not her. Orleanna was, in a way, dragged to Africa-she calls herself a...

Latest answer posted March 21, 2009 2:28 pm UTC

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The Poisonwood Bible

At the beginning of The Poisonwood Bible, Leah is a dutiful daughter who shares her father's vision of the world, religious principles, and belief in the importance of missionary work. As the book...

Latest answer posted April 11, 2018 11:57 pm UTC

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The Poisonwood Bible

In The Poisonwood Bible, the society in Kilanga, the village in the Congo to which the Price family relocates, changes during the time that the Prices are there. When the Prices arrive, the...

Latest answer posted August 13, 2010 6:25 am UTC

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The Poisonwood Bible

Barbara Kingsolver set her novel in the 1960's in the Congo of Africa in a small village named Kilanga. The village itself with all of its inhabitants were fictional; however, Kingsolver did a lot...

Latest answer posted January 18, 2009 7:41 am UTC

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The Poisonwood Bible

When Tata Ndu comes into the mission church and tries to hold an election between Jesus Christ and the local deity of Kilanga, Reverend Price says that Jesus is exempt from elections. The villagers...

Latest answer posted September 16, 2019 1:48 am UTC

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The Poisonwood Bible

The third-person perspective that is given serves several possible purposes. The first is to create an eerie sense of foreboding, that someone is watching, observing them on their walk through the...

Latest answer posted May 10, 2010 2:18 am UTC

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The Poisonwood Bible

The Poisonwood Bible has much in common with such critiques of colonialism, but it also moves beyond them, incorporating some realities from the postcolonial age. This is partly because it is...

Latest answer posted October 26, 2016 3:17 am UTC

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The Poisonwood Bible

The answer to this question can be found at the end of the book, as Adah reveals what she has become and how she thinks of Africa now as she looks back to her past in the light of all that she has...

Latest answer posted February 2, 2013 7:29 am UTC

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The Poisonwood Bible

Nathan Price is a determined, stubborn man with tunnel-vision. He can only see life through the lens of accomplishing his goals and dreams in regards to missionary work. So, his four girls grow...

Latest answer posted August 12, 2009 5:07 am UTC

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The Poisonwood Bible

I think the tranformation and moral growth of Leah can be mapped out by investigating her relationship with her father. At the beginning of the novel we see that she is wholeheartedly supportive of...

Latest answer posted April 30, 2011 3:57 am UTC

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The Poisonwood Bible

Nathan's lack of love for his family is also his betrayal of them. He rules them with an iron hand, cruelly abusing them. He betrays them when he doesn't allow his wife or daughters to explore any...

Latest answer posted June 27, 2007 2:54 am UTC

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The Poisonwood Bible

In "Book Six" of The Poisonwood Bible, Adah says that "this is the story I believe in," and proceeds to detail a version of the story of human creation. She says that the first people held on to...

Latest answer posted August 16, 2010 7:04 am UTC

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The Poisonwood Bible

Although it is difficult and reductive to discuss any significant work of literature in terms of a single theme (on this point see, for instance, Richard Levin’s classic indictment of thematic...

Latest answer posted September 2, 2011 12:13 pm UTC

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The Poisonwood Bible

There are numerous instances of betrayal in The Poisonwood Bible. In many of them, the betrayal when examined turns out not to have been a betrayal after all. Often it is better described as the...

Latest answer posted September 9, 2016 3:15 am UTC

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The Poisonwood Bible

She first calls them the "Tribes of Ham" (21), and continues to refer to them as this throughout the book. It is based on the Bible story of Noah's disrespectul son being given a curse...

Latest answer posted December 2, 2008 11:10 am UTC

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The Poisonwood Bible

Any time you have a story from different points of view, it is in order for the reader to read all aspects and gleen the truth from the whole. For instance, if twenty people see a car accident,...

Latest answer posted January 30, 2008 5:19 am UTC

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The Poisonwood Bible

That is an interesting question, one that really makes you think about Leah's character. At the beginning of the novel, Leah adores her father and is a strong advocate of his cause. However, once...

Latest answer posted February 24, 2010 1:39 pm UTC

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The Poisonwood Bible

Leah's resentment of the Bible is a complicated matter and is based on many factors. Overall, the most powerful cause of her resentment of the Bible is that her father's faith leads him to make...

Latest answer posted January 20, 2008 12:32 am UTC

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The Poisonwood Bible

The Poisonwood Bible is Barbara Kingsolver's allegorical novel about a monomaniacal Baptist minister named Nathan Price who sweeps his wife (Orleanna) and their four daughters away from the Atlanta...

Latest answer posted September 18, 2018 8:25 am UTC

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The Poisonwood Bible

The novel chronicles the Belgian colonization of the Congo as well as U.S. efforts to control the country after it gains independence. The Price family unwittingly becomes involved in this process...

Latest answer posted October 22, 2007 12:25 pm UTC

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The Poisonwood Bible

In The Poisonwood Bible, the reverend Nathan Price attempts to use religion to control the villagers and change their way of life. Nathan is obsessed with his conception of religion, and he...

Latest answer posted August 14, 2010 9:50 pm UTC

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The Poisonwood Bible

I think that one distinct way in which Nathan shows his male domination is how the power dynamics of the family are governed. Nathan is the alpha and omega of everything. He punishes the girls...

Latest answer posted September 2, 2013 6:25 pm UTC

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The Poisonwood Bible

Nelson is a young Congolese orphan boy, one of many in this war-torn country. Despite his many trials and tribulations, Nelson shows himself to be a hard-working, assiduous student at the village...

Latest answer posted October 25, 2018 9:01 am UTC

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The Poisonwood Bible

Lets start with an overview of the novel itself. The Poisonwood Bible is a story about postcolonial Africa. This culture at this time was experiencing the trauma of having been colonized,...

Latest answer posted December 23, 2007 7:21 am UTC

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The Poisonwood Bible

About 80 pages into the section, in a chapter narrated by Ruth May, Orleanna and Nathan fight over the fact that some of the tribal elders are saying that Rachel needs to be circumcised so that she...

Latest answer posted June 9, 2010 10:11 am UTC

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The Poisonwood Bible

It's 1959, and the Price family are getting ready to travel from Georgia to their new home in Congo. They pack everything they think they will need to make this huge transition much more smooth....

Latest answer posted March 6, 2019 10:57 am UTC

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The Poisonwood Bible

What screams at me most loudly when reading your question is the fact that in the language of the Congo, the same word can mean many different things depending on the tone of voice or the...

Latest answer posted January 29, 2008 11:56 pm UTC

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