Questions and Answers for The Poetry of Larkin

The Poetry of Larkin

Discuss the role of irony in Larkin's poems "Church Going" and "Mr. Bleaney."

In "Church Going," Larkin employs irony in contrasting the common reverence ascribed to church going with the astute, tongue-in-cheek reflections of a non-believer. The poem begins with the persona...

Latest answer posted December 17, 2019 5:33 pm UTC

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The Poetry of Larkin

Explain the last stanza of "Ambulances" by Philip Larkin: "At last begin to loosen. Far / From the exchange of love...

In Philip Larkin’s poem “Ambulances,” the ambulance is the vehicle—literally—that intertwines the living and the dead. In the last stanza, Larkin finishes the thought from the previous stanza: “the...

Latest answer posted March 13, 2020 1:29 pm UTC

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The Poetry of Larkin

Comment on the use of language in "Church Going" and "Mr. Bleaney".

In both poems, Larkin creates a rather informal, conversational tone. One language technique he uses to create this effect is enjambment, whereby sentences, or more specifically phrases or clauses...

Latest answer posted December 17, 2019 5:58 pm UTC

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The Poetry of Larkin

How does Larkin move from observation to reflection in "Church Going" and "MCMXIV"?

In the first three stanzas of "MCMXIV," Larkin offers a series of observations about the queues of men enlisting to fight in World War I, the shopfronts and "tin advertisements" of the town, and...

Latest answer posted December 17, 2019 7:36 pm UTC

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The Poetry of Larkin

"For borne away in deadened air / May go the sudden shut of loss / Round something nearly at an end, / And what...

The poem "Ambulances" by Philip Larkin is a bit dismal and depressing. The theme of death and finality is woven throughout the lines of this poem. It is free verse, so although the lines do not...

Latest answer posted March 13, 2020 2:06 pm UTC

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