Philosophy Questions and Answers

Philosophy

There is a very important relationship between thinking and language. In a sense, they are codependent upon one another. (That is not to say that language is the only way to convey a thought.) One...

Latest answer posted October 29, 2018 5:28 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Philosophy

The previous answer is headed in the right direction, but isn't quite right. Philosophy is a non-person, so "it" doesn't seek to grow in wisdom; it doesn't seek anything at all. Philosophers...

Latest answer posted August 14, 2016 10:13 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Philosophy

Plato defines "the good" as an unchanging "form" that cannot be comprehended by sight or other senses. There were other forms, like "truth" and "beauty," but the "good" was the highest of these...

Latest answer posted November 13, 2017 4:38 pm UTC

3 educator answers

Philosophy

To be redeemed or achieve redemption, a person must see the folly of their ways and decide to change. A redeemed person has been transformed. Perhaps the classic story of redemption is A Christmas...

Latest answer posted January 20, 2019 1:19 pm UTC

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Philosophy

Rousseau and Locke are both supporters and proponents of the freedom and choice of humans. They believe that the idea of a kingdom, wherein one individual has sovereign control over others is a...

Latest answer posted November 11, 2019 8:40 pm UTC

3 educator answers

Philosophy

While Confucius wrote at a time and place different from those of Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle, much of his thoughts relate closely with the three Greek thinkers. In his Analects, Confucius...

Latest answer posted July 21, 2010 1:26 am UTC

1 educator answer

Philosophy

To begin, it's worth noting that there is a somewhat quasi-mythical quality in play within all three of these traditions. The living person of Socrates has largely disappeared within the popular...

Latest answer posted September 14, 2019 6:46 pm UTC

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Philosophy

Romanticism was a movement in the arts centered in Europe and North America. It emphasized art as a form of individual self-expression and believed the value of an artistic work lay in its...

Latest answer posted August 28, 2016 6:51 pm UTC

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Philosophy

You should get different responses to this question. In the nature of relativism, perhaps this makes sense. Cultural relativism is the philosophical approach which suggests that it is difficult...

Latest answer posted July 31, 2010 12:26 am UTC

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Philosophy

An evaluative concept entails that there is a value that has been placed upon an axiom, belief, or idea. This value can be either positive, or negative. The mere description of something is only...

Latest answer posted October 13, 2012 11:01 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Philosophy

María Lugones is an Argentinian-born feminist philosopher who rose to prominence based on her theory of multiple selves. Her essay “Playfulness, ‘World’-Travelling, and Loving Perception” was a...

Latest answer posted November 30, 2019 12:05 am UTC

3 educator answers

Philosophy

In his Nicomachean Ethics, Aristotle explains how virtue enables humans to act reasonably; we are not born virtuous, but we learn to become virtuous by practice. There are two types of virtues:...

Latest answer posted November 18, 2020 10:11 am UTC

1 educator answer

Philosophy

Working toward short-term goals, for what it's worth, is one of the foundations of my day to day life. Though this is not a philosophical tenet, working to build, to grow, to progress, and to...

Latest answer posted December 30, 2012 8:31 pm UTC

3 educator answers

Philosophy

The arguments of St. Anselm and of Gaunilo, two eleventh-century thinkers, are both ontological in character. Ontological arguments about the existence of God, based in premises ostensibly derived...

Latest answer posted February 26, 2019 5:42 am UTC

1 educator answer

Philosophy

According to James Rachels, Cultural Relativism, as it has been called, challenges our ordinary belief in the objectivity and universality of moral truth. It says, in effect, that there is no such...

Latest answer posted September 16, 2018 8:17 pm UTC

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Philosophy

Western philosophical thought began in Ancient Greece. Loosely translated, the word philosophy means wisdom. How people should live, how they should think, and what they should believe was the...

Latest answer posted February 22, 2020 8:38 pm UTC

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Philosophy

The philosophy of the decentered subject can be traced back to Descartes in the 17th century. However, it is also a part of the post-structuralism school and it has intertwined itself with modern...

Latest answer posted June 20, 2011 12:24 am UTC

1 educator answer

Philosophy

I don't think I agree with this quote. It is hard to take risks without subjecting others to those risks. For example, a man might decide to give up a secure job and start a business. If he fails...

Latest answer posted September 19, 2014 12:05 am UTC

6 educator answers

Philosophy

Philosophy affects ethical issues because a person’s ethical framework is partly built upon a person’s philosophical framework. There is a link between philosophy and ethical behavior because...

Latest answer posted February 20, 2013 11:43 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Philosophy

The previous post is accurate in suggesting that the issue of life and death lends itself to studying ethics. There are many elements involved in the health care industry that requires a strong...

Latest answer posted July 18, 2010 6:23 pm UTC

3 educator answers

Philosophy

You certainly may use thinking skills to pursue an understanding of your purpose in life--how readily that purpose will become apparent is a different question. Starting with becoming apparent, the...

Latest answer posted October 18, 2012 12:08 am UTC

9 educator answers

Philosophy

In order to make it through our lives, we have to believe some things without much analysis. For example, when I "go" at a green light, I have to assume the competence and the attentiveness of the...

Latest answer posted March 11, 2019 12:39 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Philosophy

The answer to this question, to my mind, is two-fold. This is not to say that there are two different answers, but that the one best answer is to be seen as having two angles of view within it. In...

Latest answer posted January 3, 2013 5:46 pm UTC

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Philosophy

Bringing to bear a generic affability that is equal to everyone and not emphasized, specialized, or individualized for anyone seems to diminish the importance of personal relationships. Socializing...

Latest answer posted January 3, 2013 4:12 pm UTC

3 educator answers

Philosophy

The statement attempts to configure philosophy in a light where the questions end up driving consciousness, not necessarily the answers. Russell's essay strikes at how one should view philosophy...

Latest answer posted July 5, 2010 5:10 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Philosophy

This is an awesome question. As you can see there will be quite a bit of disagreement. Socrates is a pretty good answer, since Plato preserved much of his insights. Moreover, we are still taking...

Latest answer posted August 3, 2015 2:52 pm UTC

3 educator answers

Philosophy

There are several problems with the majority of our knowledge revolving around ourselves, particularly if we are unconscious of this bias, and never seek to correct it. First, in the most practical...

Latest answer posted June 16, 2020 6:21 am UTC

1 educator answer

Philosophy

Moral complacency describes an unwillingness to examine one's moral opinions as fallible; it is the belief that one cannot be mistaken in one's moral precepts. People who are morally complacent...

Latest answer posted May 2, 2019 3:13 pm UTC

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Philosophy

I would say that good is a more powerful force than evil in the modern world. To argue this, we have to briefly define good and evil. This is a task that takes a certain about of hubris, as this...

Latest answer posted March 3, 2018 2:31 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Philosophy

Moral absolutism is a meta-ethical and universal agreement that acknowledges two essential behaviors: right and wrong. It is through moral absolutism that the idea of things being inherently "good"...

Latest answer posted July 15, 2015 12:40 am UTC

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Philosophy

In most cases, a truth—especially a startling or upsetting truth—should be given in small doses. This is common wisdom: even when the police, for example, show up at a person's door to report a...

Latest answer posted July 7, 2019 11:58 am UTC

3 educator answers

Philosophy

Moral absolutism and moral relativism are essentially opposite approaches to thinking about ethics and morality. Moral absolutists hold that some things are absolutely right or wrong no matter the...

Latest answer posted April 19, 2017 4:17 am UTC

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Philosophy

Philosophy is term which was first used by the followers of Pythagoras in ancient Greece and subsequently adopted by the Socratics and other thinkers such as Isocrates. It originally covered the...

Latest answer posted August 1, 2012 12:27 am UTC

1 educator answer

Philosophy

This is a question that doesn't have an easy answer because first, though much of Romanticism was opposed to the ideals of the Enlightenment, it was also in some ways, paradoxically, an outgrowth...

Latest answer posted March 15, 2019 10:11 pm UTC

3 educator answers

Philosophy

The pre-Socratics were natural philosophers who focused mainly on the natural world and its processes. They refused to believe that something could come from nothing, so they looked for a common...

Latest answer posted November 11, 2019 6:38 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Philosophy

This is, in some ways, a variant on the "trolley problem" in philosophy. One of the main issues here is that it forces a choice in a way that may not be entirely realistic. Thus my response would...

Latest answer posted October 19, 2016 6:31 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Philosophy

The egocentric predicament is the idea that individuals cannot see reality outside of their own perceptions. This phrase was used by philosophy professor Ralph Barton Perry in the Journal of...

Latest answer posted August 1, 2016 12:03 pm UTC

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Philosophy

The general philosophical term for this is "determinism." Philosophers have, since the very origin of the discipline in classical Greece, debated the question of the degree to which we are...

Latest answer posted May 7, 2016 4:11 am UTC

1 educator answer

Philosophy

This is a great question! There is no definitive answer, as both philosophers deal with theories of the existence. Certain modern-day philosophers lean toward Descartes, while others view the mind...

Latest answer posted June 30, 2019 12:39 am UTC

1 educator answer

Philosophy

You need to be careful with reading too much into doodling - often a doodle can just be a doodle, but as other editors have stated the subconscious can express itself through such doodlings. You...

Latest answer posted July 6, 2010 12:30 am UTC

4 educator answers

Philosophy

OK, Martin Luther was an anti-Semite, something he shared with almost everyone in Europe who was not Jewish at the time. He still succeeded in breaking the stranglehold of the Catholic Church on...

Latest answer posted March 21, 2009 1:47 am UTC

6 educator answers

Philosophy

In the Republic, Plato's ideal city-state can be see as a metaphor for the soul, with which it has close parallels. Like the city-state, the soul contains three elements, which must maintain a...

Latest answer posted October 16, 2019 1:50 pm UTC

4 educator answers

Philosophy

The main problem with this questions is that the Sophists were not an actual school of thought. The Older Sophists (as they are properly called to distinguish them from later writers of the "Second...

Latest answer posted October 13, 2015 9:59 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Philosophy

What an interesting question. It is, of course, a bit on the subjective side. All of the four ideas are important, and depending on your situation, you might find a different one to be more...

Latest answer posted April 11, 2010 3:35 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Philosophy

I would only add; 1) Bacon’s useful “eliminative induction” and 2) his difference from the Aristotelian inductionists. Bacon’s eliminative induction; For instance, in order to find the root cause...

Latest answer posted December 4, 2010 5:29 am UTC

2 educator answers

Philosophy

We can make the distinction clearer with the aid of a thought experiment. Imagine that you are asked by someone to shoot one person. If you do not do as you are asked, the person asking you to...

Latest answer posted August 25, 2017 11:59 pm UTC

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Philosophy

Hard determinism is a philosophical outlook which rejects the notion that human beings have free will. Hard determinists argue that free will is an illusion: free will is a subjective impression....

Latest answer posted March 24, 2020 7:09 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Philosophy

The conclusion to Taylor's piece connects to its opening. In the opening, Taylor uses the Myth of Sisyphus as a paradigm to help encompass how one can define meaning in life. Examining his...

Latest answer posted July 13, 2013 6:14 am UTC

1 educator answer

Philosophy

Socrates devoted the whole of his adult life to philosophy, or the love of wisdom. Not only that, but philosophy was so important to him that he was prepared to sacrifice his life for it. Socrates...

Latest answer posted October 31, 2018 6:23 am UTC

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Philosophy

This is a difficult question to answer in a straightforward way because not only were the philosophers of both the Greeks and the French unique in comparison to each other, but they were also...

Latest answer posted June 1, 2019 2:51 pm UTC

2 educator answers

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