Periodic Table (Predicting the Structure and Properties of the Elements)

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Periodic Table (Predicting the Structure and Properties of the Elements) Questions and Answers

Periodic Table (Predicting the Structure and Properties of the Elements)

Krypton is a group 18 noble gas. As such, it has a stable octet in its valence shell and is extremetly unreactive. Its electron configuration is shown below: 1s2, 2s2, 2p6, 3s2, 3p6, 3d10, 4s2,...

Latest answer posted November 4, 2012, 4:59 pm (UTC)

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Periodic Table (Predicting the Structure and Properties of the Elements)

Noble gases are chemically inert meaning they can exist in nature alone or chemically stable. Apparently, if you force then to react, certain amount of energy is required to attain that status....

Latest answer posted December 29, 2012, 9:29 am (UTC)

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Periodic Table (Predicting the Structure and Properties of the Elements)

Living things contain the element carbon. That is because many organic compounds are present in living things such as carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, nucleic acids. Organic compounds contain both...

Latest answer posted January 8, 2013, 6:24 pm (UTC)

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Periodic Table (Predicting the Structure and Properties of the Elements)

First, we have to locate the halogens in the periodic table. It is located at the group 17 (second from the right). Valence electrons are the outermost electrons in a particular atom which is...

Latest answer posted July 30, 2013, 7:09 pm (UTC)

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Periodic Table (Predicting the Structure and Properties of the Elements)

You can tell much about the valence shell electrons of an element based on its position on the periodic table. The vertical rows are called groups and they tell how many and what kind of valence...

Latest answer posted October 22, 2012, 3:55 am (UTC)

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Periodic Table (Predicting the Structure and Properties of the Elements)

Here's a more complete answer: 1) Draw a line perpendicular to the curved surface of the mirror, through the center. This is called the principal axis. The point where it touches the mirror is...

Latest answer posted March 16, 2012, 11:18 pm (UTC)

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