P. G. Wodehouse Questions and Answers

P. G. Wodehouse

Rupert Morison is an incidental character in P.G. Wodehouse's charming short story "The Man Upstairs." The story is about a large-hearted young millionaire who becomes enamored of a young lady he...

Latest answer posted March 17, 2010 3:17 am UTC

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P. G. Wodehouse

Bertram Wilberforce Wooster—generally known as Bertie—is a wealthy, idle young man about town and the employer of the perfect valet, Jeeves, who is always getting him out of trouble. In The Code of...

Latest answer posted June 16, 2020 9:10 am UTC

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P. G. Wodehouse

"The Custody of the Pumpkin" by P. G. Wodehouse was originally published in 1924 in two places, the American magazine The Saturday Evening Post and the Strand Magazine in Britain. It was...

Latest answer posted May 17, 2015 6:18 pm UTC

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P. G. Wodehouse

“The Custody of the Pumpkin” is about a lord whose gardener quits, so he has no one to get his precious pumpkin ready for the fair. In this silly story, Lord Emsworth finds his “particularly...

Latest answer posted May 28, 2013 7:04 pm UTC

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P. G. Wodehouse

In P. G. Wodehouse's short story "The Man Upstairs" Annette immediately finds herself drawn to the struggling artist Alan Beverley, who is charming and modest. His fellow painter Reginald Sellers,...

Latest answer posted October 1, 2019 6:54 am UTC

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P. G. Wodehouse

The question of how to present the thoughts of Lord Emsworth in "The Custody of the Pumpkin" by P.G. Wodehouse after he has fired his talented head gardener Mr. Mcallister requires thinking through...

Latest answer posted May 16, 2015 1:57 pm UTC

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P. G. Wodehouse

Wodehouse uses a familiar trope in his work as he describes an opening event in this story: the servant as much smarter than his bumbling, somewhat idiotic employer. This role reversal and the...

Latest answer posted August 22, 2019 1:35 am UTC

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P. G. Wodehouse

An old gentleman fond of new gadgets, the ninth Earl of Emsworth has recently bought a telescope after reading an article on astronomy. Looking through his new telescope atop one of his turrets,...

Latest answer posted September 30, 2014 4:54 am UTC

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P. G. Wodehouse

P.G. Wodehouse is quite well-known for his portrayal of eccentric, snobbish and socially-parasitic aristocrats in his different chronicles. An example of the most well-known chronicles would be...

Latest answer posted February 12, 2012 12:40 am UTC

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P. G. Wodehouse

In P.G. Wodehouse's "The Custody of the Pumpkin" we find a recurring topic in the Wodehouse's treatment of the filial relationships between aristocratic fathers and their sons. This tendency is to...

Latest answer posted March 8, 2012 12:22 am UTC

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P. G. Wodehouse

The great basis of comedy is hyperbole or exaggeration. If understatement is the great tool of tragedy—the author or narrator getting out of the way so that readers can experience painful emotions...

Latest answer posted January 7, 2020 9:48 pm UTC

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P. G. Wodehouse

The title of P.G. Wodehouse's short story "The Custody of the Pumpkin" is justified by the author by making the tending and care of an award-winning pumpkin the sole focus in the life of Lord...

Latest answer posted December 2, 2012 2:46 pm UTC

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P. G. Wodehouse

Mr. Rupert Morrison is Beverley’s friend. The latter lends him his rooms at the Albany so that “he can be perfectly quiet and undisturbed” while writing his novel. He is the one who unknowingly...

Latest answer posted September 16, 2018 12:06 pm UTC

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P. G. Wodehouse

The way Wodehouse constructs a narrative in which the Hon. Freddie Threepwood can be admired is through: vocabulary general description metaphor and simile imagery juxtaposition of terms and...

Latest answer posted September 21, 2013 10:16 pm UTC

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P. G. Wodehouse

In Wodehouse's story, "The Man Upstairs," Annette has several reasons for praising Mr. Beverly's painting. First, he has been kind to her about the songs she writes and tries to sell. Second, like...

Latest answer posted October 29, 2019 4:58 pm UTC

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P. G. Wodehouse

Annette Brougham teaches singing and piano. Her students are described as being "at once her salvation and her despair." Wodehouse says that they are all alike in having "solid ivory skulls" and...

Latest answer posted February 26, 2020 11:50 am UTC

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P. G. Wodehouse

The ending is satisfying because the pumpkin wins and Emsworth forgives his son. An ending is generally considered effective if it is satisfying, and resolves the conflicts of the story. In a...

Latest answer posted September 13, 2015 8:45 pm UTC

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P. G. Wodehouse

This is an awkward question to answer because there are a couple of errors in the question itself. The first is that this is not a short story, though seemingly well anthologized, but a chapter...

Latest answer posted November 9, 2013 12:09 pm UTC

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P. G. Wodehouse

In "The Man Upstairs," Annette Brougham has been composing a waltz when she is disturbed by someone knocking on the ceiling of her apartment. She goes upstairs to make her displeasure known and...

Latest answer posted November 3, 2019 10:35 am UTC

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P. G. Wodehouse

In his short story “The Custody of the Pumpkin,” P. G. Wodehouse mocks the system of social class in Britain almost immediately. Examples simply from the first few pages of the story include the...

Latest answer posted December 22, 2011 1:49 pm UTC

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P. G. Wodehouse

The title of the story is somewhat ironic. The first hint is that “custody” usually refers to children, not pumpkins. In the story, Lord Emsworth seems to care more about his prize-contending...

Latest answer posted September 18, 2012 7:53 pm UTC

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P. G. Wodehouse

When putting together the character traits of Lord Emsworth, P.G. Wodehouse ultimately aimed to create a caricature of a typical post WWI English aristocrat. There is an implication in doing this;...

Latest answer posted November 11, 2012 2:31 pm UTC

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P. G. Wodehouse

In addition to the comparison of Freddie to a rabbit, the reader of "The Custody of The Pumpkin" will find other instances where Wodehouse uses animal characteristics to describe his characters’...

Latest answer posted March 17, 2018 2:50 am UTC

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P. G. Wodehouse

Yes, there is in fact a long tradition of humor in English literature that extends from Geoffrey Chaucer to P. G. Wodehouse and beyond. The Encyclopedia of British Humorists: Chaucer to John...

Latest answer posted June 10, 2013 12:41 am UTC

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P. G. Wodehouse

On the face of it, there are a fair few similarities between Lord Emsworth and Mr. Donaldson. For one thing, both of them are quite well-to-do. Emsworth is a British aristocrat living in a large...

Latest answer posted June 17, 2020 10:11 am UTC

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P. G. Wodehouse

Wodehouse uses irony, tone, repetition, hyperbole, contrast, and benign conflict in creating Lord Emsworth and Angus so that they are as interesting and colorful as they are. irony often...

Latest answer posted July 1, 2011 2:50 pm UTC

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P. G. Wodehouse

In P.G. Wodehouse's "The Custody of the Pumpkin", Lord Emsworth and his son Freddie represent the aristocratic society of post World War I England. This social stratum is interesting because it was...

Latest answer posted September 23, 2012 1:39 am UTC

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P. G. Wodehouse

The use of an award-winning vegetable (although really a fruit), as the sole source of interest in the life of Lord Emworth is Roald Dahl's way to use sarcasm when exposing the worthless waste of...

Latest answer posted August 24, 2013 10:12 pm UTC

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P. G. Wodehouse

Wodehouse built all his novels around a central comic situation the role of which was to develop the plot and characters, though his earliest "school" books may center more prominently around...

Latest answer posted April 12, 2013 1:25 am UTC

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P. G. Wodehouse

One way Wodehouse is successful in creating colorful characters is that he chooses colorful situations, imagery and similes to associate them with when he describes them and what they do. The two...

Latest answer posted September 22, 2013 12:40 am UTC

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P. G. Wodehouse

Roald Dahl conveys the importance of the pumpkin in Lord Emsworth's life by doing two kinds of juxtapositions. First, he introduces life at Blandings; the reader learns about the history of the...

Latest answer posted August 24, 2013 10:31 pm UTC

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P. G. Wodehouse

P.G. Wodehouse's hilarious satire, "The Custody of the Pumpkin" is the story of the honorable Earl of Blandings, Lord Emsworth: a man whose great rank and position in the highest class of society...

Latest answer posted July 14, 2012 6:11 pm UTC

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