Out, Out— Questions and Answers

Out, Out—

In Robert Frost's poem, "Out, out—", there are a number of literary devices employed. Paradox is seen with the following line which describes the boy doing a man's job. One might be confused that a...

Latest answer posted June 6, 2011, 2:49 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Out, Out—

In Robert Frost's "Out, Out—" the buzz saw is personified in a subtle and qualified manner. The repeated phrase "snarled and rattled" suggests an animal or an ill-natured person in the first word,...

Latest answer posted April 20, 2020, 8:53 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

Out, Out—

When the speaker says that the "buzz saw snarled and rattled," they employ a literary device called onomatopoeia: a word whose sound duplicates the sound it describes. Both snarl and rattle are...

Latest answer posted June 27, 2020, 12:42 pm (UTC)

3 educator answers

Out, Out—

The previous educator answer has identified the primary type of metaphor used in this poem: personification. While, of course, not all metaphor is personification, personification is a particular...

Latest answer posted August 29, 2018, 3:10 pm (UTC)

3 educator answers

Out, Out—

Robert Frost's poem "Out, Out-" alludes to Macbeth's soliloquy in Act Five, Scene 5 of the play Macbeth. In Macbeth's soliloquy, he comments on the death of his wife and analyzes how insignificant...

Latest answer posted January 16, 2018, 7:00 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

Out, Out—

The buzz saw in Robert Frost's "Out--Out--" symbolizes the mindless power of machinery that, when out of the control of man, can destroy human life. Published in 1916 when Britain was already...

Latest answer posted October 18, 2016, 4:03 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Out, Out—

Robert Frost's poem "Out, Out--" is the story of a young boy "Doing a man's work, though a child at heart--" (l. 24); the boy is using a saw to cut wood. Frost creates a sense of foreboding from...

Latest answer posted December 7, 2015, 1:19 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Out, Out—

Frost uses a detached and emotionless tone to create a sense of horror in this poem. The closest that the narrator gets to expressing emotion is when he comments that he wishes "they might have...

Latest answer posted November 9, 2018, 11:34 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

Out, Out—

Both Wilfred Owen's "Disabled" and Robert Frost's "Out, Out--" are poems about the loss of life as it has been. While the boy in Frost's poem completely loses his life, Owen's young man loses his...

Latest answer posted February 22, 2017, 11:27 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Out, Out—

The poem by Robert Frost reports the death of a teenaged boy in a woodcutting accident. The deceptively straightforward, almost journalistically emotionless account represents the shock a senseless...

Latest answer posted July 28, 2019, 12:50 am (UTC)

3 educator answers

Out, Out—

Tone describes the way the author seems to feel about the subject of the text. The tone of this text seems somewhat indifferent, or emotionless. The narrator describes a pretty violent and...

Latest answer posted November 8, 2018, 11:51 pm (UTC)

3 educator answers

Out, Out—

The last line represents some of the most disturbing elements featured in the poem. After enduring the pain of the boy pleading with the sister to prevent the doctor from amputating his arm,...

Latest answer posted December 28, 2009, 11:42 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

Out, Out—

Robert Frost's 1916 poem "Out, Out—" is considered to be a narrative poem; it is written in one long stanza and consists of thirty-four lines. The poem does not follow any rhyme scheme, although it...

Latest answer posted September 23, 2021, 5:27 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Out, Out—

There are a number of examples of repetition in the poem. For example, the word "boy" is repeated six times to emphasize the youth of the character. The tragedy of the poem is all the more...

Latest answer posted June 3, 2019, 12:59 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

Out, Out—

The commas and periods throughout "Out, Out - " are indications of slight pauses or the end of a sentence, as in most written literature. The colon in the ninth line ("nothing happened: day was all...

Latest answer posted August 6, 2012, 3:00 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Out, Out—

The educator answer above explains that this poem was based on a real event in Frost's life. However, it is not necessary to know the backstory to the poem in order to appreciate and feel moved by...

Latest answer posted June 15, 2018, 8:13 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

Out, Out—

The irony here is that the accident happens at the end of the work day, at a time when the boy might have been dismissed to take an extra half hour to himself. In fact, his sister is even there...

Latest answer posted July 23, 2018, 11:23 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

Out, Out—

There are arguably several themes at work in this poem, but I think Frost's choice of title points us toward what he considers to be the most important. "Out, out --" is an allusion to...

Latest answer posted October 28, 2018, 9:11 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

Out, Out—

Life goes on. The boy made a fatal mistake and Frost says "No more to build on there" meaning the boy is now useless to his family. He can't be taught anything else and so those who are left must...

Latest answer posted April 13, 2016, 4:47 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Out, Out—

When trying to pick a thesis statement, it helps to think of the themes of the poem, and what the author is trying to say with its message. In this poem, Frost writes a rather depressing tale of a...

Latest answer posted February 24, 2010, 11:10 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

Out, Out—

The "buzz saw" in this poem can indeed be interpreted as a symbol. Certainly the saw seems to have greater agency in the poem than the boy does. At the beginning of the poem, it is the saw itself...

Latest answer posted March 22, 2018, 9:01 am (UTC)

3 educator answers

Out, Out—

Interestingly, "snarl" and "rattle" are both etymological equivalents. "Snarl" comes from the German word for "rattle." Both words are onomatopoeic, meaning that the words imitate the sound they...

Latest answer posted March 22, 2016, 4:35 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Out, Out—

Frost's narrator says that the "buzz saw snarled," using a metaphor (implied by the verb snarled) to compare the saw to an angry and unpredictable animal. A metaphor compares two unalike things,...

Latest answer posted November 28, 2018, 1:04 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

Out, Out—

One important element in Frost's "Out, Out—" involves agency. The poem opens with personified actions of the buzzsaw against the passive mountain setting in the distance. This juxtaposition of...

Latest answer posted April 14, 2019, 3:16 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

Out, Out—

Caesura is a pause in the middle of a line of poetry. It was originally meant as a place for Anglo-Saxon scops to draw in a breath given the length of the poetry they were reciting. While the use...

Latest answer posted August 15, 2011, 12:33 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Out, Out—

The poem “Out, Out—“ by Robert Frost was based on an actual farm accident that killed a neighbor boy when Frost was a boy himself. The title of the poem is found in the Shakespearean play Macbeth....

Latest answer posted January 19, 2013, 5:17 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Out, Out—

In Frost's poem, "Out, Out--," there is an underlying tension between machine and human. One interpretation of Frost's poem "Out, Out--" considers the year in which it was written, a time when boys...

Latest answer posted October 9, 2016, 7:21 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

Out, Out—

Robert Frost's grisly poem "Out, Out" tells the story of a young boy cutting fire wood who gets his hand caught in the saw, nearly severing it. He startles when his sister calls out for supper...

Latest answer posted July 28, 2012, 6:35 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Out, Out—

This poem, which is based on a real-life event, is full of striking images. The most impressive one, in my opinion, occurs early in the poem when the narrator describes "five mountain ranges one...

Latest answer posted March 20, 2009, 5:09 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Out, Out—

Robert Frost's poem "Out, Out--" is a simple and sad story of a young boy who cuts off his hand in a work accident and ultimately bleeds to death. The poem is not only a comment on the brevity of...

Latest answer posted March 6, 2016, 3:17 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Out, Out—

Asking how the saw is made to be friendly or friend-like is an interesting question, considering that the first line doesn't make the saw sound nice at all. The saw snarls and rattles in the first...

Latest answer posted November 20, 2018, 12:19 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

Out, Out—

This poem is a narrative poem because it tells a story. Narrative poetry can also contain a plot, refer to different characters, and even involve dialogues. The characters in this poem are the boy,...

Latest answer posted October 5, 2015, 2:09 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Out, Out—

The poem is indeed a narrative poem. It tells the story of a young man who has a fatal buzz-saw accident. As he is cutting wood, his sister rings the bell for supper, and the saw slips slicing...

Latest answer posted August 30, 2010, 12:35 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Out, Out—

Blank verse is a type of literary device used in poetry, signified as non-rhyming phrases in iambic pentameter (ten syllables per line). Poets use this form of verse in longer narrative poems. This...

Latest answer posted June 29, 2018, 3:03 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

Out, Out—

Literally, references to sunset and time are significant to the plot because it affects when the boy will cut his hand off with the saw and die. Symbolically, these references to time foreshadow...

Latest answer posted February 18, 2012, 1:03 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Out, Out—

The saw definitely seems sinister because of Frost's repeated description of how it "snarled and rattled," but Frost is also careful to present a certain level of indifference within the saw, which...

Latest answer posted July 8, 2018, 9:37 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

Out, Out—

I think that the primary message behind the poem is how people respond to grief. In the horrific nature of the accident it seems very surprising to find that the family returns to their normalcy...

Latest answer posted December 27, 2009, 7:15 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

Out, Out—

The poem "Out, out--", by Robert Frost, can be interpreted in several ways, as is common with Frost's poetry. But it includes a description of various responses to life's tragedies. In this...

Latest answer posted November 2, 2010, 3:37 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

Out, Out—

I have answered each of your questions below, and for your convenience I have included the questions in order. The allusion in the title of this poem is an allusion to Macbeth by William...

Latest answer posted May 9, 2014, 3:50 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Out, Out—

Robert Frost's poem, "Out, Out—" is a poem written in blank verse (unrhymed iambic pentameter) in which an unidentified third-person narrator describes a farm accident resulting in the death of a...

Latest answer posted April 22, 2015, 9:36 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Out, Out—

Most people that have read Robert Frost's poetry are likely surprised at "Out, Out." First of all, it does not contain Frost's typical multi-stanza format with easily identifiable rhythm, meter,...

Latest answer posted February 11, 2020, 6:40 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

Out, Out—

The reason is because if they had said the one thing instead of the other, the boy would not have been killed. When the accident happens, it is late. We are told that it was "under sunset" and...

Latest answer posted December 22, 2009, 7:45 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

Out, Out—

The title of the poem is an allusion to a passage in Shakespeare's "Macbeth" which reads, "Out, out, brief candle! Life's but a walking shadow, a poor player that struts and frets...

Latest answer posted July 10, 2008, 3:37 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

Out, Out—

“Out,Out—“ by Robert Frost is based on a real event. When he was a teenager, Frost’s neighbor friend had his hand cut off in an accident. This became the basis for this narrative poem. Another...

Latest answer posted November 24, 2012, 8:31 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Out, Out—

The poem recounts a day when the men and boys are working in the yard cutting firewood with a buzz saw. The setting is in Vermont, where five mountain ranges can be seen in the background. It is...

Latest answer posted March 24, 2016, 4:15 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Out, Out—

These two poems deal with traumatic experiences in different ways. Robert Frost's "Out, Out—" deals with the maiming of a boy by a sawmill as it happens. The poet powerfully describes the...

Latest answer posted June 24, 2020, 6:06 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Out, Out—

In his poem "Out, Out--" Robert Frost uses the juxtaposition of positive, warm details to emphasize the horror and unexpectedness of the boy's sudden death. The poem begins: The buzz saw snarled...

Latest answer posted June 6, 2016, 6:47 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Out, Out—

The buzz saw in the Robert Frost poem "Out, Out -" is personified, given the characteristics of a living, breathing entity, malevolent, like a beast. The buzz-saw "snarl(s) and rattle(s)...(making)...

Latest answer posted April 29, 2010, 1:03 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Out, Out—

This is one of my favorite poems by Frost. The poem's story, though graphic and tragic, makes use of so many types of figurative language that it serves as one of the great imagery poems. I...

Latest answer posted July 25, 2012, 6:16 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Out, Out—

The theme of this poem is the idea that fate, or chance, has a huge impact on our life. It is almost as if fate has a life of its own -- it goes around doing stuff to us and we can't stop it. In...

Latest answer posted December 27, 2009, 8:09 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

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