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  • Othello
    Women in Othello are not at all insignificant––after all, the downfall of the titular character in the play is due to his devotion to a woman, Desdemona, even though it is orchestrated by Iago;...

    Asked by simmonsboc3 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Othello
    Gender is extremely significant in Othello. Iago uses gender norms common in Venice at that time to manipulate Othello into killing the woman he loves. The stage for this is set early in the play,...

    Asked by simmonsboc3 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Othello
    Throughout the play, Shakespeare illustrates the passionate and often misguided emotions of love and hate. Love is illustrated by Othello's strong affection for Desdemona. Despite Othello's passion...

    Asked by shanevenrick on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Othello
    Othello feels regret as soon as he discovers from Emilia that Iago has been plotting against him. Emilia tells Othello, who has just killed his wife, that Iago asked her to get the handkerchief—a...

    Asked by shantolmarie on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Othello
    At the start of the play, Emilia appears to be subservient and manipulated by her husband, Iago, but by the end she has gained in self-confidence and has seen him for the villain he is; finally,...

    Asked by user8944130 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Othello
    As a tale of betrayal, suspected infidelity, and murder, Othello makes a powerful statement about human nature. Certainly, this popular Shakespearean play made waves during its time. Yet, its...

    Asked by user8364877 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Othello
    There have been several film versions of Othello. Three are notable. The first starred Orson Welles, who also produced and directed the film in 1951. The movie is very much of its era, filmed in...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Othello
    It is Iago's envy that causes him to hatch his scheme to destroy Othello. This scheme forms the basis for the entire plot. The audience discovers in the first scene of the play that Othello has...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Othello
    Iago states in act 1, scene 1 that he is jealous Othello made Cassio his lieutenant. Iago believes he has had more battle experience and is therefore better qualified for the position than Cassio....

    Asked by scupala13 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Othello
    Act 3 of Othello is pivotal for the development of the play as a tragedy. This is the place in the drama when Othello finally starts to internalize the lies and deceit that Iago has been spreading...

    Asked by sister2402 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Othello
    At the end of the play, Othello smothers Desdemona because he thinks she is unfaithful. Iago has successfully manipulated him into believing that Desdemona and Cassio were having an affair. When...

    Asked by yamilkasantana on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Othello
    Othello is a respected, talented general, known for his fearless exploits and leadership in battle. Although he valiantly serves the country of Venice, he is considered an outsider because he is a...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Othello
    In act I, scene 1, Iago tells Roderigo to yell with great abandon at Desdemona's father's house to waken him. He says, "Do, with like timorous accent and dire yell/ As when, by night and...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Othello
    Jealousy is the driving force behind much of the action—and tragedy—within Shakespeare's Othello. Othello thematically traces how jealousy can destroy lives—and how so often jealousy stems...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Othello
    Unfortunately, Othello's character development over the course of the play traces a tragic fall from grace. Othello begins the play as a successful African general in the defense forces of Venice....

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Othello
    You absolutely can compare Julius Caesar with Othello. The two plays are both tragedies, so they share many similarities. Both focus on tragic heroes (Brutus in Julius Caesar and Othello in...

    Asked by sweet-ely95 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Othello
    Act II provides a clear delineation of the three characters. It is in this act that we learn what sets the three apart. The act also provides insight into how exactly Othello and Cassio,...

    Asked by bbarnes9308 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Othello
    I tend to agree with this statement, as the tragedy in Shakespeare's Othello relies upon deceptive appearances and exploited assumptions about these appearances. After all, Iago is able to dupe...

    Asked by clisa345 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Othello
    A lot of critical interpretations of Shakespeare's Othello focus on the single-minded evil of Iago's deception and the ways in which it brings about Othello's downfall. However, while this...

    Asked by clisa345 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Othello
    Othello is a notably heroic character, making his manipulated downfall all the more tragic. Although his nobility and honor are some of his primary characteristics, Othello is also a black man in a...

    Asked by user9558828 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Othello
    One of the themes of the play is the nature of what people consider to be civilized. Within the world of the play, Venice represent the "civilized" European world and Othello, as a Moor, is a...

    Asked by gardeezakariyya on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Othello
    There are certainly some instances of deception that are not perpetuated by Iago. In Act III, Scene 4, Desdemona has lost her handkerchief and wonders aloud about its whereabouts. Emilia says she...

    Asked by dittoyoheh on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Othello
    As it was in the ancient biblical story of Cain, the "worm of jealousy" moves into Othello's heart and causes him to commit his heinous act of killing Desdemona. Iago is the one who places this...

    Asked by pierrekirollos on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Othello
    Othello's status as a black man in a white man's world is of vital importance to the plot of Shakespeare's Othello. In defiance of stereotypical and racist assumptions about the black community...

    Asked by coco1104 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Othello
    Iago is a complex and duplicitous character. That means we can never fully trust what he says, even when he is speaking a soliloquy. Part of his belief that he deserved the promotion is grounded in...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Othello
    In Act 3, Scene 3, Othello does refer to his race. He uses the reference in a monologue after the devious Iago has manipulated him into believing that Desdemona was involved in an inappropriate...

    Asked by kem8blue on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Othello
    What an interesting assignment. Shakespeare's Othello offers many choices. You can choose an incident that is a turning point in the play--when the incident results in a character's or characters'...

    Asked by mgmpopstar on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Othello
    You might start your search for quotations in Iago's description of the perfect woman, which occurs in the first part of Act 2, when he is jesting with Desdemona and Emilia. After listing these...

    Asked by emmasty56 on via web

    2 educator answers

  • Othello
    Brutal in many ways, Shakespeare's Othello is especially ruthless in its treatment of women. By the end of the play, Desdemona and Emilia are dead, both murdered in swift succession by their...

    Asked by user2668262 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Othello
    The first incident, featured in Act I, Scene 1, in which Iago and his sidekick Roderigo inform Brabantio that Othello stole his daughter Desdemona was definitely planned. When the upset Brabantio,...

    Asked by anjoomohun108 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Othello
    Well, for starters, Shakespeare used the word "honest" or some form of it a lot in Othello: over fifty times! So it's definitely worth our consideration. First, the characters talk about who does...

    Asked by user9328970 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Othello
    What a creative assignment! I am assuming you already know what product that your sales pitch will be about. So, I will try to help you with Othello's language. Look at Othello's early speeches...

    Asked by tiaplusharry on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Othello
    This quote is significant because it represents Iago's efforts to convince Othello that Cassio is having an affair with Desdemona. Because Cassio is supposedly involved with Desdemona behind...

    Asked by faithnaphazi on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Othello
    Othello was angry at Desdemona because he believed that she was cheating on him by having an affair. He had been manipulated into believing a lie. Othello had fallen in love with her when she asked...

    Asked by udoyspider1512 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Othello
    The quote comes from Act 3, scene 3, and is an instruction from Othello to Iago. In this quite lengthy scene, Iago has managed to persuade Othello into believing that Desdemona and Othello's...

    Asked by icejjfishlover on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Othello
    The handkerchief plays a major role in the play. It is probably the most crucial evidence to prove Iago's claim that Desdemona and Cassio, Othello's lieutenant, are having an affair. To understand...

    Asked by amohsen2011 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Othello
    I'm not sure that women were explicitly hated in the sense that people would shout at a woman, "I hate you!" However, one could argue that the oppressive and patriarchal society which dominated...

    Asked by alainedwige23 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Othello
    William Shakespeare's Othello is another complex tragedy that explores themes of betrayal, prejudice, and appearance versus reality. I'll provide a brief summary, but I'll also include additional...

    Asked by user9447729 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Othello
    This moment is perhaps the most important turning point in Othello, and the climax to the lengthiest scene in the play. In the space of 461 lines (from "Ha? I like not that" to "I am your own...

    Asked by madzimaashleyrose on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Othello
    Obviously, the entire narrative of Othello builds toward a horrific act of misogynistic violence: Othello's murder of Desdemona in the play's final scene. This crime is presaged by the painful...

    Asked by whitesideo on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Othello
    Observing Brabantio's distress over what he regards as the loss of his daughter in marriage to Othello, as well as the strength and genuineness of Othello and Desdemona's affections for one...

    Asked by kathrynortiz28 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Othello
    Roderigo is angry because he believes that Iago has been using him without any reward to himself. He has been giving Iago all his money in the hope that he would enable Roderigo to win Desdemona's...

    Asked by shaymcneail on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Othello
    Iago is almost entirely responsible for Othello's downfall. From beginning to end, Iago orchestrates the entire dastardly scheme that brings about Othello's disgrace and demise, starting with the...

    Asked by stalloneheeralall2 on via web

    2 educator answers

  • Othello
    Othello is a tragedy by William Shakespeare. It was probably written in 1603 and was first performed in 1604. It is based on the 1565 story Un Capitano Moro ("A Moorish Captain") by Cinthio....

    Asked by catchsohini07 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Othello
    At the end of Act II, Scene 1, Iago provides a few reasons why he despizes Othello so much. First, Iago acknowledges that, even though he cannot stand Otehllo, Iago knows Othello is of a constant,...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Othello
    In Shakespeare' Othello, the tragic hero Othello is driven primarily by jealousy, confusion, and a sense of inferiority to murder his wife Desdemona. Iago sets up a ruse to get Othello to believe...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Othello
    Iago is indeed acting out of jealousy. First of all, he's jealous that Othello passed him up for a promotion and chose to honor Cassio instead. Secondly, he's jealous because he believes that...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Othello
    One thing we learn about Iago in the second act is that he treats his wife Emilia poorly and appears to be a misogynist. He announces to everyone that Emilia talks too much and then makes...

    Asked by user2045370 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Othello
    Othello's tragic downfall is in his gullibility and lack of good judgement. While he is easily swayed in his opinions about others, his opinions are seemingly fixed unless an outside voice leads...

    Asked by zolekanonsindiso on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Othello
    If by inferiorities, you mean weaknesses or inferiority complexes, it is true that every character in the play has insecurities and flaws. One of Cassio’s weaknesses is alcohol: “I have very...

    Asked by loratosed on via web

    1 educator answer

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